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Resistive random-access memory

About: Resistive random-access memory is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 6883 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 143134 citation(s). The topic is also known as: RRAM & ReRAM.
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Journal ArticleDOI
Rainer Waser1, Rainer Waser2, Masakazu AonoInstitutions (2)
01 Nov 2007-Nature Materials
TL;DR: A coarse-grained classification into primarily thermal, electrical or ion-migration-induced switching mechanisms into metal-insulator-metal systems, and a brief look into molecular switching systems is taken.
Abstract: Many metal–insulator–metal systems show electrically induced resistive switching effects and have therefore been proposed as the basis for future non-volatile memories. They combine the advantages of Flash and DRAM (dynamic random access memories) while avoiding their drawbacks, and they might be highly scalable. Here we propose a coarse-grained classification into primarily thermal, electrical or ion-migration-induced switching mechanisms. The ion-migration effects are coupled to redox processes which cause the change in resistance. They are subdivided into cation-migration cells, based on the electrochemical growth and dissolution of metallic filaments, and anion-migration cells, typically realized with transition metal oxides as the insulator, in which electronically conducting paths of sub-oxides are formed and removed by local redox processes. From this insight, we take a brief look into molecular switching systems. Finally, we discuss chip architecture and scaling issues.

4,263 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
Akihito Sawa1Institutions (1)
01 Jun 2008-Materials Today
Abstract: Rapid advances in information technology rely on high-speed and large-capacity nonvolatile memories. A number of alternatives to contemporary Flash memory have been extensively studied to obtain a more powerful and functional nonvolatile memory. We review the current status of one of the alternatives, resistance random access memory (ReRAM), which uses a resistive switching phenomenon found in transition metal oxides. A ReRAM memory cell is a capacitor-like structure composed of insulating or semiconducting transition metal oxides that exhibits reversible resistive switching on applying voltage pulses. Recent advances in the understanding of the driving mechanism are described in light of experimental results involving memory cells composed of perovskite manganites and titanates.

2,398 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Hon-Sum Philip Wong1, Heng-Yuan Lee, Shimeng Yu1, Yu-Sheng Chen  +5 moreInstitutions (1)
02 May 2012-
TL;DR: The physical mechanism, material properties, and electrical characteristics of a variety of binary metal-oxide resistive switching random access memory (RRAM) are discussed, with a focus on the use of RRAM for nonvolatile memory application.
Abstract: In this paper, recent progress of binary metal-oxide resistive switching random access memory (RRAM) is reviewed. The physical mechanism, material properties, and electrical characteristics of a variety of binary metal-oxide RRAM are discussed, with a focus on the use of RRAM for nonvolatile memory application. A review of recent development of large-scale RRAM arrays is given. Issues such as uniformity, endurance, retention, multibit operation, and scaling trends are discussed.

1,891 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
08 Apr 2010-Nature
TL;DR: Bipolar voltage-actuated switches, a family of nonlinear dynamical memory devices, can execute material implication (IMP), which is a fundamental Boolean logic operation on two variables p and q such that pIMPq is equivalent to (NOTp)ORq.
Abstract: The authors of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors-the industry consensus set of goals established for advancing silicon integrated circuit technology-have challenged the computing research community to find new physical state variables (other than charge or voltage), new devices, and new architectures that offer memory and logic functions beyond those available with standard transistors. Recently, ultra-dense resistive memory arrays built from various two-terminal semiconductor or insulator thin film devices have been demonstrated. Among these, bipolar voltage-actuated switches have been identified as physical realizations of 'memristors' or memristive devices, combining the electrical properties of a memory element and a resistor. Such devices were first hypothesized by Chua in 1971 (ref. 15), and are characterized by one or more state variables that define the resistance of the switch depending upon its voltage history. Here we show that this family of nonlinear dynamical memory devices can also be used for logic operations: we demonstrate that they can execute material implication (IMP), which is a fundamental Boolean logic operation on two variables p and q such that pIMPq is equivalent to (NOTp)ORq. Incorporated within an appropriate circuit, memristive switches can thus perform 'stateful' logic operations for which the same devices serve simultaneously as gates (logic) and latches (memory) that use resistance instead of voltage or charge as the physical state variable.

1,423 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20227
2021406
2020556
2019577
2018483
2017589

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Topic's top 5 most impactful authors

Ming Liu

113 papers, 3.8K citations

Qi Liu

90 papers, 2.7K citations

Shibing Long

87 papers, 2.6K citations

Hangbing Lv

80 papers, 1.5K citations

Jinfeng Kang

75 papers, 2.8K citations