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Revenue

About: Revenue is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 35025 publications have been published within this topic receiving 462961 citations. The topic is also known as: top line & net sales.


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Book
01 Jan 1995
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors set aside much of the received wisdom of the last 200 years of industrial management and in its place presented a new set of organizing principles by which managers can rebuild their businesses.
Abstract: "Reengineering the Corporation" sets aside much of the received wisdom of the last 200 years of industrial management and in its place presents a new set of organizing principles by which managers can rebuild their businesses. The book provides numerous examples and in-depth case studies of how leading organizations are achieving significant competitive gains through reengineering: How Ford Motor reduced the size of its North American accounts payable organization by 80% while improving the process; how IBM is leasing subsidiary cut its deal-making process from seven days to four hours; and how Taco Bell used a new set of production and management processes to fuel a six-fold growth in revenue.

5,812 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Several limitations of revenue sharing are identified to (at least partially) explain why it is not prevalent in all industries, including cases in which revenue sharing provides only a small improvement over the administratively cheaper wholesale price contract.
Abstract: Under a revenue-sharing contract, a retailer pays a supplier a wholesale price for each unit purchased, plus a percentage of the revenue the retailer generates. Such contracts have become more prevalent in the videocassette rental industry relative to the more conventional wholesale price contract. This paper studies revenue-sharing contracts in a general supply chain model with revenues determined by each retailer's purchase quantity and price. Demand can be deterministic or stochastic and revenue is generated either from rentals or outright sales. Our model includes the case of a supplier selling to a classical fixed-price newsvendor or a price-setting newsvendor. We demonstrate that revenue sharing coordinates a supply chain with a single retailer (i.e., the retailer chooses optimal price and quantity) and arbitrarily allocates the supply chain's profit. We compare revenue sharing to a number of other supply chain contracts (e.g., buy-back contracts, price-discount contracts, quantity-flexibility contracts, sales-rebate contracts, franchise contracts, and quantity discounts). We find that revenue sharing is equivalent to buybacks in the newsvendor case and equivalent to price discounts in the price-setting newsvendor case. Revenue sharing also coordinates a supply chain with retailers competing in quantities, e.g., Cournot competitors or competing newsvendors with fixed prices. Despite its numerous merits, we identify several limitations of revenue sharing to (at least partially) explain why it is not prevalent in all industries. In particular, we characterize cases in which revenue sharing provides only a small improvement over the administratively cheaper wholesale price contract. Additionally, revenue sharing does not coordinate a supply chain with demand that depends on costly retail effort. We develop a variation on revenue sharing for this setting.

2,271 citations

Book
01 Jan 1988
TL;DR: In this article, the importance of political relative to economic factors in accounting for revenue production policies is discussed, and a wide-ranging theoretical and historical study demonstrates that political factors are more important than economic factors.
Abstract: Margaret Levi's wide-ranging theoretical and historical study demonstrates the importance of political relative to economic factors in accounting for revenue production policies.

2,062 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors systematically analyze the mechanism involved in each of the following channels of potential revenue increase or cost reduction owing to better environmental practices: (a) better access to certain markets; (b) differentiating products; (c) selling pollution-control technology; (d) risk management and relations with external stakeholders; (e) cost of material, energy, and services; (f)cost of cap...
Abstract: Executive Overview The conventional wisdom concerning environmental protection is that it comes at an additional cost imposed on firms, which may erode their global competitiveness. However, during the last decade, this paradigm has been challenged by a number of analysts (e.g., Porter & van der Linde, 1995), who have argued basically that improving a company' environmental performance can lead to better economic or financial performance, and not necessarily to an increase in cost. The aim of this paper is to review empirical evidence of improvement in both environmental and economic or financial performance. We systematically analyze the mechanism involved in each of the following channels of potential revenue increase or cost reduction owing to better environmental practices: (a) better access to certain markets; (b) differentiating products; (c) selling pollution-control technology; (d) risk management and relations with external stakeholders; (e) cost of material, energy, and services; (f) cost of cap...

1,409 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors developed a general test for "monopoly" and derived testable restrictions on the firm's reduced-form revenue equation which must be satisfied by any profit-maximizing firm whose choices are not affected by either strategic interactions or the threat of entry.
Abstract: This paper develops a very general test for "monopoly." Using standard comparative statics analysis, the authors derive testable restrictions on the firm's reduced-form revenue equation which must be satisfied by any profit-maximizing firm whose choices are not affected by either strategic interactions or the threat of entry. For such an unfettered monopolist, the sum of the factor price elasticities of the reduced-form revenue equation must be nonpositive. The set of interesting alternative hypotheses is not empty. The authors develop simple models of oligopolistic, competitive, and monopolistically-competitive markets for which this test statistic may take on positive values. Copyright 1987 by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

1,344 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20251
20242
20233,760
20228,298
20211,657
20201,940