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Saccharum munja

About: Saccharum munja is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 45 publications have been published within this topic receiving 522 citations.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a Saccharum munja on the derelict coal fly ash (FA) lagoons of NTPC Unchahar, India was identified as a native perennial grass in the rehabilitation process.

94 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a study revealed that distillery sludge contains not only mixture of complex organic pollutants but also retains high quantity of Fe (5264.49), Zn (43.47), Cu (847.46), Mn (238.60), and Pb (31.22

82 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The plant species having potential for FA deposits’ restoration were identified on the basis of their ecological importance, dominance at the study sites and socio-economic importance for rural livelihoods.
Abstract: Proliferation of fly ash (FA) deposits and its toxicity have become a global concern, which contaminate the ecosystems of our Earth. In this regard, identification of potential plant species for FA deposits’ restoration is the main concern. Keeping this view in mind, the present study was conducted to identify potential plant species naturally growing on FA deposits for the restoration purposes. Six intensive surveys were made during 2010–2014 to collect naturally growing plant species during different seasons from two FA deposits in Unchahar of Raebareli district, Uttar Pradesh, India. The plant species having potential for FA deposits’ restoration were identified on the basis of their ecological importance, dominance at the study sites and socio-economic importance for rural livelihoods. Typha latifolia L., Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers., Saccharum spontaneum L., Saccharum bengalense Retz. (syn. Saccharum munja), Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) DC., Ipomoea carnea Jacq. and Acacia nelotica L. are identified as potential plant species for FA deposits’ restoration. Furthermore, the characteristics of naturally colonized species can be used for the phytorestoration during a revegetation plan of new FA deposits for multiple benefits.

80 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors evaluated the acute toxic potential of aqueous ethanolic extract of S. munja roots according to OECD TG No. 425 and found that the LD50 of the extract was greater than 2000mg/kg b.w.
Abstract: Background S. munja roots have been used in ethno medicines for the treatment of different ailments. Despite its beneficial uses no studies on its toxicity potential have been reported. Objective The study was designed to evaluate acute toxic potential of aqueous ethanolic extract of S. munja roots according to OECD TG No. 425. Material and methods Female mice were divided into two groups (n = 5). One group served as control while the other as treated group that received 2000 mg/kg b.w. of S. munja roots ethanolic extract orally. Then both groups were observed for 14 days. Then the blood samples were collected by cardiac puncture, under chloroform general anesthesia and were subjected to hematological and biochemical analyses. The vital organs of anesthetized animals were preserved for histopathological examination. Results The the data revealed that LD50 of the extract was greater than 2000 mg/kg b.w. There was no significant alteration found in body weight and organ to body mass index. In comparison with control group, there was significant increase in levels of ALT, AST, total proteins, globulin levels, serum urea, cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL, platelet count, MCV, MCH, WBC count and lymphocytes whereas ALP and MCHC levels were reduced significantly. Conclusions From the data obtained in this study, It can be concluded that though LD50 is greater than 2000 mg/kg b.w. but moderate toxicity signs appeared in liver, kidney, lipid profile and CBC also showed blood dyscresias at limit dose.

72 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, different physical, chemical and biological pretreatment methods were used for lignocellulosic biomasses (S.munja and sugarcane bagasse).

54 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20213
20204
20193
20182
20173
20152