scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Topic

Secure multi-party computation

About: Secure multi-party computation is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 4827 publications have been published within this topic receiving 124027 citations.


Papers
More filters
Proceedings ArticleDOI
03 Nov 1982
TL;DR: This paper describes three ways of solving the millionaires’ problem by use of one-way functions (i.e., functions which are easy to evaluate but hard to invert) and discusses the complexity question “How many bits need to be exchanged for the computation”.
Abstract: Two millionaires wish to know who is richer; however, they do not want to find out inadvertently any additional information about each other’s wealth. How can they carry out such a conversation? This is a special case of the following general problem. Suppose m people wish to compute the value of a function f(x1, x2, x3, . . . , xm), which is an integer-valued function of m integer variables xi of bounded range. Assume initially person Pi knows the value of xi and no other x’s. Is it possible for them to compute the value of f , by communicating among themselves, without unduly giving away any information about the values of their own variables? The millionaires’ problem corresponds to the case when m = 2 and f(x1, x2) = 1 if x1 < x2, and 0 otherwise. In this paper, we will give precise formulation of this general problem and describe three ways of solving it by use of one-way functions (i.e., functions which are easy to evaluate but hard to invert). These results have applications to secret voting, private querying of database, oblivious negotiation, playing mental poker, etc. We will also discuss the complexity question “How many bits need to be exchanged for the computation”, and describe methods to prevent participants from cheating. Finally, we study the question “What cannot be accomplished with one-way functions”. Before describing these results, we would like to put this work in perspective by first considering a unified view of secure computation in the next section.

3,510 citations

Book ChapterDOI
11 Aug 1991
TL;DR: It is shown how to distribute a secret to n persons such that each person can verify that he has received correct information about the secret without talking with other persons.
Abstract: It is shown how to distribute a secret to n persons such that each person can verify that he has received correct information about the secret without talking with other persons. Any k of these persons can later find the secret (1 ? k ? n), whereas fewer than k persons get no (Shannon) information about the secret. The information rate of the scheme is 1/2 and the distribution as well as the verification requires approximately 2k modular multiplications pr. bit of the secret. It is also shown how a number of persons can choose a secret "in the well" and distribute it veritably among themselves.

2,543 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
12 Oct 1987
TL;DR: This paper presents an extremely efficient, non-interactive protocol for verifiable secret sharing, which provides asynchronous networks with a constant-round simulation of simultaneous broadcast networks whenever even a bare majority of processors are good.
Abstract: This paper presents an extremely efficient, non-interactive protocol for verifiable secret sharing. Verifiable secret sharing (VSS) is a way of bequeathing information to a set of processors such that a quorum of processors is needed to access the information. VSS is a fundamental tool of cryptography and distributed computing. Seemingly difficult problems such as secret bidding, fair voting, leader election, and flipping a fair coin have simple one-round reductions to VSS. There is a constant-round reduction from Byzantine Agreement to non-interactive VSS. Non-interactive VSS provides asynchronous networks with a constant-round simulation of simultaneous broadcast networks whenever even a bare majority of processors are good. VSS is constantly repeated in the simulation of fault-free protocols by faulty systems. As verifiable secret sharing is a bottleneck for so many results, it is essential to find efficient solutions.

1,202 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
22 May 2017
TL;DR: This paper presents new and efficient protocols for privacy preserving machine learning for linear regression, logistic regression and neural network training using the stochastic gradient descent method, and implements the first privacy preserving system for training neural networks.
Abstract: Machine learning is widely used in practice to produce predictive models for applications such as image processing, speech and text recognition. These models are more accurate when trained on large amount of data collected from different sources. However, the massive data collection raises privacy concerns. In this paper, we present new and efficient protocols for privacy preserving machine learning for linear regression, logistic regression and neural network training using the stochastic gradient descent method. Our protocols fall in the two-server model where data owners distribute their private data among two non-colluding servers who train various models on the joint data using secure two-party computation (2PC). We develop new techniques to support secure arithmetic operations on shared decimal numbers, and propose MPC-friendly alternatives to non-linear functions such as sigmoid and softmax that are superior to prior work. We implement our system in C++. Our experiments validate that our protocols are several orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art implementations for privacy preserving linear and logistic regressions, and scale to millions of data samples with thousands of features. We also implement the first privacy preserving system for training neural networks.

1,164 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Feb 1989
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a verifiable secret sharing protocol for games with incomplete information and show that the secrecy achieved is unconditional and does not rely on any assumption about computational intractability.
Abstract: Under the assumption that each participant can broadcast a message to all other participants and that each pair of participants can communicate secretly, we present a verifiable secret sharing protocol, and show that any multiparty protocol, or game with incomplete information, can be achieved if a majority of the players are honest. The secrecy achieved is unconditional and does not rely on any assumption about computational intractability. Applications of these results to Byzantine Agreement are also presented.Underlying our results is a new tool of Information Checking which provides authentication without cryptographic assumptions and may have wide applications elsewhere.

1,061 citations


Network Information
Related Topics (5)
Cryptography
37.3K papers, 854.5K citations
93% related
Encryption
98.3K papers, 1.4M citations
91% related
Authentication
74.7K papers, 867.1K citations
88% related
Key (cryptography)
60.1K papers, 659.3K citations
88% related
Server
79.5K papers, 1.4M citations
82% related
Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20241
202369
2022139
2021202
2020264
2019243