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Topic

Secure two-party computation

About: Secure two-party computation is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 975 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 56523 citation(s).
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
Andrew Chi-Chih Yao1Institutions (1)
03 Nov 1982-
TL;DR: This paper describes three ways of solving the millionaires’ problem by use of one-way functions (i.e., functions which are easy to evaluate but hard to invert) and discusses the complexity question “How many bits need to be exchanged for the computation”.
Abstract: Two millionaires wish to know who is richer; however, they do not want to find out inadvertently any additional information about each other’s wealth. How can they carry out such a conversation? This is a special case of the following general problem. Suppose m people wish to compute the value of a function f(x1, x2, x3, . . . , xm), which is an integer-valued function of m integer variables xi of bounded range. Assume initially person Pi knows the value of xi and no other x’s. Is it possible for them to compute the value of f , by communicating among themselves, without unduly giving away any information about the values of their own variables? The millionaires’ problem corresponds to the case when m = 2 and f(x1, x2) = 1 if x1 < x2, and 0 otherwise. In this paper, we will give precise formulation of this general problem and describe three ways of solving it by use of one-way functions (i.e., functions which are easy to evaluate but hard to invert). These results have applications to secret voting, private querying of database, oblivious negotiation, playing mental poker, etc. We will also discuss the complexity question “How many bits need to be exchanged for the computation”, and describe methods to prevent participants from cheating. Finally, we study the question “What cannot be accomplished with one-way functions”. Before describing these results, we would like to put this work in perspective by first considering a unified view of secure computation in the next section.

3,504 citations


Proceedings ArticleDOI
27 Oct 1986-
TL;DR: A new tool for controlling the knowledge transfer process in cryptographic protocol design is introduced and it is applied to solve a general class of problems which include most of the two-party cryptographic problems in the literature.
Abstract: In this paper we introduce a new tool for controlling the knowledge transfer process in cryptographic protocol design. It is applied to solve a general class of problems which include most of the two-party cryptographic problems in the literature. Specifically, we show how two parties A and B can interactively generate a random integer N = p?q such that its secret, i.e., the prime factors (p, q), is hidden from either party individually but is recoverable jointly if desired. This can be utilized to give a protocol for two parties with private values i and j to compute any polynomially computable functions f(i,j) and g(i,j) with minimal knowledge transfer and a strong fairness property. As a special case, A and B can exchange a pair of secrets sA, sB, e.g. the factorization of an integer and a Hamiltonian circuit in a graph, in such a way that sA becomes computable by B when and only when sB becomes computable by A. All these results are proved assuming only that the problem of factoring large intergers is computationally intractable.

3,178 citations


Proceedings ArticleDOI
Ran Canetti1Institutions (1)
14 Oct 2001-
Abstract: We propose a novel paradigm for defining security of cryptographic protocols, called universally composable security. The salient property of universally composable definitions of security is that they guarantee security even when a secure protocol is composed of an arbitrary set of protocols, or more generally when the protocol is used as a component of an arbitrary system. This is an essential property for maintaining security of cryptographic protocols in complex and unpredictable environments such as the Internet. In particular, universally composable definitions guarantee security even when an unbounded number of protocol instances are executed concurrently in an adversarially controlled manner, they guarantee non-malleability with respect to arbitrary protocols, and more. We show how to formulate universally composable definitions of security for practically any cryptographic task. Furthermore, we demonstrate that practically any such definition can be realized using known techniques, as long as only a minority of the participants are corrupted. We then proceed to formulate universally composable definitions of a wide array of cryptographic tasks, including authenticated and secure communication, key-exchange, public-key encryption, signature, commitment, oblivious transfer, zero knowledge and more. We also make initial steps towards studying the realizability of the proposed definitions in various settings.

3,128 citations


Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1988-
Abstract: Every function of n inputs can be efficiently computed by a complete network of n processors in such a way that: If no faults occur, no set of size t

2,093 citations


Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1988-
TL;DR: It is shown that any reasonable multiparty protocol can be achieved if at least 2n/3 of the participants are honest and the secrecy achieved is unconditional.
Abstract: Under the assumption that each pair of participants can communicate secretly, we show that any reasonable multiparty protocol can be achieved if at least 2n/3 of the participants are honest. The secrecy achieved is unconditional. It does not rely on any assumption about computational intractability.

1,559 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202113
202013
201910
201816
201759
201670