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Sedition

About: Sedition is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 321 publications have been published within this topic receiving 2161 citations.


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Book
01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: Stone's Perilous Times as mentioned in this paper investigates how the First Amendment and other civil liberties have been compromised in America during wartime, and delineates the consistent suppression of free speech in six historical periods from the Sedition Act of 1798 to the Vietnam War.
Abstract: Geoffrey Stone's Perilous Times incisively investigates how the First Amendment and other civil liberties have been compromised in America during wartime Stone delineates the consistent suppression of free speech in six historical periods from the Sedition Act of 1798 to the Vietnam War, and ends with a coda that examines the state of civil liberties in the Bush era Full of fresh legal and historical insight, Perilous Times magisterially presents a dramatic cast of characters who influenced the course of history over a two-hundred-year period: from the presidents-Adams, Lincoln, Wilson, Roosevelt, and Nixon-to the Supreme Court justices-Taney, Holmes, Brandeis, Black, and Warren-to the resisters-Clement Vallandingham, Emma Goldman, Fred Korematsu, and David Dellinger Filled with dozens of rare photographs, posters, and historical illustrations, Perilous Times is resonant in its call for a new approach in our response to grave crises

145 citations

BookDOI
29 Jun 2007
TL;DR: In this paper, Aidi et al. examine the sensibilities that enable a penal democracy to thrive and argue that the United States wages war against enemies abroad and against its own people at home.
Abstract: The United States has more than two million people locked away in federal, state, and local prisons. Although most of the U.S. population is non-Hispanic and white, the vast majority of the incarcerated—and policed—is not. In this compelling collection, scholars, activists, and current and former prisoners examine the sensibilities that enable a penal democracy to thrive. Some pieces are new to this volume; others are classic critiques of U.S. state power. Through biography, diary entries, and criticism, the contributors collectively assert that the United States wages war against enemies abroad and against its own people at home. Contributors consider the interning or policing of citizens of color, the activism of radicals, structural racism, destruction and death in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina, and the FBI Counterintelligence Program designed to quash domestic dissent. Among the first-person accounts are an interview with Dhoruba Bin Wahad, a Black Panther and former political prisoner; a portrayal of life in prison by a Plowshares nun jailed for her antinuclear and antiwar activism; a discussion of the Puerto Rican Independence Movement by one of its members, now serving a seventy-year prison sentence for sedition; and an excerpt from a 1970 letter by the Black Panther George Jackson chronicling the abuses of inmates in California’s Soledad Prison. Warfare in the American Homeland also includes the first English translation of an excerpt from a pamphlet by Michel Foucault and others. They argue that the 1971 shooting of George Jackson by prison guards was a murder premeditated in response to human-rights and justice organizing by black and brown prisoners and their supporters. Contributors. Hishaam Aidi, Dhoruba Bin Wahad (Richard Moore), Marilyn Buck, Marshall Eddie Conway, Susie Day, Daniel Defert, Madeleine Dwertman, Michel Foucault, Carol Gilbert, Sirene Harb, Rose Heyer, George Jackson, Joy James, Manning Marable, William F. Pinar, Oscar Lopez Rivera, Dylan Rodriguez, Jared Sexton, Catherine von Bulow, Laura Whitehorn, Frank B. Wilderson III

102 citations

BookDOI
01 Dec 2001
TL;DR: Other entries include: Afghanistan Advertising Aristotle Art, Design, and Barbie Bad Language Baudelaire, Charles Beatles, The Bible, The Book Burning Calvin, John Chaplin, Charles The Cold War Darwin, Charles Enlightenment, The Erasmus, Desiderius Federal Bureau of Investigation Frank, Anne Ginsberg, Allen Griffith, D.W.W., The Birth of a Nation Haiti Heresy Homosexual and Lesbian Expression Humanism, Renaissance Inquisition International Committee for Artists' Freedom Jefferson, Thomas Judaism 1: Censorship in the Biblical Tradition Kubrick, Stanley: A Clockwork Orange
Abstract: Entries include: Afghanistan Advertising Aristotle Art, Design, and Barbie Bad Language Baudelaire, Charles Beatles, The Bible, The Book Burning Calvin, John Chaplin, Charles The Cold War Darwin, Charles Enlightenment, The Erasmus, Desiderius Federal Bureau of Investigation Frank, Anne Ginsberg, Allen Griffith, D.W.: The Birth of a Nation Haiti Heresy Homosexual and Lesbian Expression Humanism, Renaissance Inquisition International Committee for Artists' Freedom Jefferson, Thomas Judaism 1: Censorship in the Biblical Tradition Kubrick, Stanley: A Clockwork Orange Literature and the Law Luther, Martin Mafia, The Mann, Thomas Miller, Arthur Moliere Moral Reformers and Pressure Groups Nickelodeons Northern Ireland Odets, Clifford: Waiting for Lefty O'Neill, Eugene Picasso, Pablo Plato Pornography Quakers (The Religious Society of Friends) Race and IQ Rambo films Sade, Marquis de Sedition and the Public Order Sexism and Sexual Harassment Shakespeare in U.S. Schools Singapore Television Totalitarianism Underground Press V-chip Wilde, Oscar Zola, Emile and many more.

79 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The tribunate of the plebs, according to a statement that Marcus Cicero put into the mouth of his brother Quintus, was an office born in sedition and destined to create sedition as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The tribunate of the plebs, according to a statement that Marcus Cicero puts into the mouth of his brother Quintus, was an office born in sedition and destined to create sedition (‘in seditione et ad seditionem nata,’ Leg III, 19) There were two major periods of sedition The first, the time of strife between patricians and plebeians, lasted from the birth of the tribunate in the early fifth century to the Lex Hortensia of 287 BC The second is usually dated from the tribunate of Tiberius Gracchus in 133 to the dictatorship of Caesar, a time when the tribunate was repeatedly an instrument of revolution, now accompanied by violence The general view is that in the century-and-a-half between these two periods the tribunes, except in the time of Gaius Flaminius, were in accord with the Senate and were indeed agents of senatorial rule

77 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202326
202247
20217
20208
20196
201813