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Seismic analysis

About: Seismic analysis is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 11376 publications have been published within this topic receiving 154701 citations. The topic is also known as: structural calculation & seismic design.


Papers
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MonographDOI
27 Mar 1992
TL;DR: In this paper, the causes and effects of earthquakes: Seismicity, Structural Response, Seismic Action, and Seismical Action in Member Design principles of member design.
Abstract: Causes and Effects of Earthquakes: Seismicity--Structural Response--Seismic Action. Principles of Member Design. Reinforced Concrete Ductile Frames. Structural Walls. Dual Systems. Masonry Structures. Reinforced Concrete Buildings with Restricted Ductility. Foundation Structures. Appendices. Symbols. References. Index.

3,086 citations

Book
29 Mar 1996
TL;DR: In this article, the authors focus on designing adequate displacement and ductility capacity into new bridges, with less significance placed on strength, where a strength hierarchy is established in a bridge to ensure that damage is controllable and occurs only where the designer intends.
Abstract: This book should be of interest to practicing bridge designers and researchers investigating the seismic design of bridges It is appropriate for graduate courses or upper level undergraduate courses in seismic design of bridges The approach relies heavily on the principles of capacity design, where a strength hierarchy is established in a bridge to ensure that damage is controllable and occurs only where the designer intends This approach, which is well established for seismic design of buildings, has been extended and modified to reflect the special demands and characteristics of bridges Particular emphasis is placed on designing adequate displacement and ductility capacity into new bridges, with less significance placed on strength The book is developed around two alternative design strategies: the traditional force-based approach where force levels are related to acceleration spectra, with checks to ensure adequate displacement capacity exists, and the newer displacement-based design approach, where displacements are the starting point in the design Introductory chapters discuss design philosophy and its impact on the performance of bridges in recent earthquakes, seismicity and soils effects, including liquefaction, in a form facilitating understanding by structural engineers, and the importance of rational consideration, from a seismic design viewpoint, of the various structural configuration possibilities in the conceptual design phase Extensive discussion of analysis is provided in Chapter 4, with emphasis on the importance of realistic modeling assumptions and appropriate choice of analytical tools Chapters 5 to 8 provide detailed information on the design of new bridges and the assessment and retrofit of existing bridges A separate chapter is devoted to design and retrofit using seismic isolation and dissipation devices Many design and analysis examples, some quite extensive in scope, are included Design aids in the form of charts and tables are also provided An index is provided

1,683 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a model for evaluating structural damage in reinforced concrete structures under earthquake ground motions is proposed, where damage is expressed as a linear function of the maximum deformation and the effect of repeated cyclic loading.
Abstract: A model for evaluating structural damage in reinforced concrete structures under earthquake ground motions is proposed. Damage is expressed as a linear function of the maximum deformation and the effect of repeated cyclic loading. Available static (monotonic) and dynamic (cyclic) test data were analyzed to evaluate the statistics of the appropriate parameters of the proposed damage model. The uncertainty in the ultimate structural capacity was also examined.

1,674 citations

Book
01 Jan 2007
TL;DR: The concept of performance-based design of structural systems was first introduced in New Zealand in 1993 as mentioned in this paper, with the goal of designing structures to achieve a specified performance limit state defined by strain or drift limits.
Abstract: The concept of designing structures to achieve a specified performance limit state defined by strain or drift limits was first introduced, in New Zealand, in 1993. Over the following years, and in particular the past five years, an intense coordinated research effort has been underway in Europe and the USA to develop the concept to the stage where it is a viable and logical alternative to current force-based code approaches. Different structural systems including frames, cantilever and coupled walls, dual systems, bridges, wharves, timber structures and seismically isolated structures have been considered in a series of coordinated research programs. Aspects relating to characterization of seismic input for displacement-based design, and to structural representation for design verification using time-history analysis have also received special attention. This paper summarizes the general design approach, the background research, and some of the more controversial issues identified in a book, currently in press, summarizing the design procedure. perceived in terms of simple mass-proportional lateral forces, resisted by elastic structural action. In the 1940's and 50's the influence of structural period in modifying the intensity of the inertia forces started to be incorporated into structural design, but structural analysis was still based on elastic structural response. Ductility considerations were introduced in the 1960's and 70's as a consequence of the experimental and empirical evidence that well- detailed structures could survive levels of ground shaking capable of inducing inertia forces many times larger than those predicted by elastic analysis. Predicted performance came to be assessed by ultimate strength considerations, using force levels reduced from the elastic values by somewhat arbitrary force-reduction factors, that differed markedly between the design codes of different seismically-active countries. Gradually this lead to a further realization, in the 1980's and 90's that strength was important, but only in that it helped to reduce displacements or strains, which can be directly related to damage potential, and that the proper definition of structural vulnerability should hence be related to deformations, not strength. This realization has lead to the development of a large number of alternative seismic design philosophies based more on deformation capacity than strength. These are generally termed " performance-based" design philosophies. The scope of these can vary from comparatively narrow structural design approaches, intended to produce safe structures with uniform risk of damage under specified seismicity levels, to more ambitious approaches that seek to also combine financial data associated with loss-of-usage, repair, and a client-based approach (rather than a code-specified approach) to acceptable risk. This paper does not attempt to provide such ambitious guidance as implied by the latter approach. In fact, it is our view that such a broad-based probability approach is more appropriate to assessment of designed structures than to the design of new structures. The

1,324 citations

Book
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a set of structural and structural design rules for concrete and steel-concrete buildings with respect to the effects of seismic action on fixed base and isolated base.
Abstract: Chapter 1. Introduction Chapter 2. Performance requirements and compliance criteria, 2.1 Performance requirements for new designs in Eurocode 8 and associated seismic hazard levels, 2.2 Compliance criteria for the performance requirements and their implementation, 2.3 Exemption from the application of Eurocode 8 Chapter 3. Seismic Actions, 3.1 Ground conditions, 3.2 Seismic action,3.3 Displacement Response Spectra Chapter 4. Design of Buildings, 4.1 Scope, 4.2 Conception of structures for earthquake resistant buildings, 4.3 Structural regularity and implications for the design, 4.4 Combination of gravity loads and other actions with the design seismic action, 4.5 Methods of analysis, 4.6 Modeling of buildings for linear analysis, 4.7 Modeling of buildings for nonlinear analysis, 4.8 Analysis for accidental torsional effects, 4.9 Combination of the effects of the components of the seismic action, 4.10 "Primary" vs. "secondary" seismic elements, 4.11 Verifications, 4.12 Special rules for frame systems with masonry infills Chapter 5. Design and detailing rules for concrete buildings, 5.1 Scope, 5.2 Types of concrete elements-Definition of their "critical regions", 5.3 Types of structural systems for earthquake resistance of concrete buildings, 5.4 Design concepts: Design for strength or for ductility and energy dissipation-Ductility Classes, 5.5 Behaviour factor q of concrete buildings designed for energy dissipation, 5.6 Design strategy for energy dissipation, 5.7 Detailing rules for local ductility of concrete members, 5.8 Special rules for large walls in structural systems of large lightly reinforced walls, 5.9 Special rules for concrete systems with masonry or concrete infills, 5.10 Design and detailing of foundation elements Chapter 6. Design and detailing rules for steel buildings, 6.1 Scope, 6.2 Dissipative versus low dissipative structures, 6.3 Capacity design principle, 6.4 Design for local energy dissipation in the elements and their connections, 6.5 Design rules aiming at the realisation of dissipative zones, 6.6 Background of the deformation capacity required by Eurocode 8, 6.7 Design against localization of strains, 6.8 Design for global dissipative behaviour of structures, 6.9 Moment resisting frames, 6.10 Frames with concentric bracings, 6.11 Frames with eccentric bracings, 6.12 Moment resisting frames with infills, 6.13 Control of design and construction Chapter 7. Design and detailing of composite steel-concrete buildings, 7.1 Introductory remark, 7.2 Degree of composite character, 7.3 Materials, 7.4 Design for local energy dissipation in the elements and their connections, 7.5 Design for global dissipative behaviour of structures, 7.6 Properties of composite sections for analysis of structures and for resistance checks, 7.7 Composite connections in dissipative zones, 7.8 Rules for members, 7.9 Design of columns, 7.10 Steel beams composite with slab, 7.11 Design and detailing rules for moment frames, 7.12 Composite concentrically braced frames, 7.13 Composite eccentrically braced frames, 7.14 Reinforced concrete shear walls composite with structural steel elements, 7.15 Composite or concrete shear walls coupled by steel or composite beams, 7.16 Composite steel plates shear walls Chapter 8. Design and detailing rules for timber buildings, 8.1 Scope, 8.2 General concepts in earthquake resistant timber buildings, 8.3 Materials and properties of dissipative zones, 8.4 Ductility classes and behaviour factors, 8.5 Detailing, 8.6 Safety verifications Chapter 9. Seismic design with base isolation, 9.1 Introduction, 9.2 Dynamics of seismic isolation, 9.3 Design criteria, 9.4 Seismic isolation systems and devices, 9.5 Modelling and analysis procedures, 9.6 Safety criteria and verifications, 9.7 Design seismic action effects on fixed base and isolated buildings Chapter 10. Foundations, retaining structures and geotechnical aspects, 10.1 Introduction, 10.2 Seismic action, 10.3 Ground properties, 10.4 Requ

1,268 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2023254
2022541
2021628
2020514
2019551
2018570