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Selenidera

About: Selenidera is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 4 publications have been published within this topic receiving 377 citations.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Two genera, Pionopsitta parrots and Selenidera toucans, corroborate a well known biogeographic disjunction in which taxa endemic to southern Central America and the Chocó region of northwestern South America are the sister‐group to a radiation within the Amazon basin.
Abstract: This paper documents congruence in geographical patterns of speciation for four clades of birds having taxa endemic to the same areas within the Neotropics. Two genera, Pionopsitta parrots and Selenidera toucans, corroborate a well known biogeographic disjunction in which taxa endemic to southern Central America and the Choco region of northwestern South America are the sister-group to a radiation within the Amazon basin. These two genera, along with two lineages within the toucan genus Pteroglossus, also document a pattern of historical interrelationships for four well known areas of endemism within Amazonia: Guyanan + (Belem-Para + (Inambari + Napo)). These generalized historical patterns are interpreted to have arisen via fragmentation (vicariance) of a widespread ancestral biota. A review of the paleogeographic evidence suggests that these vicariance events could have originated as a result of several different mechanisms operating at various times during the Cenozoic. The inference that diversification of the Neotropical biota is primarily the result of the most recent of these possible vicariance events, namely isolation within Quaternary forest refugia, is unwarranted, given present data. These patterns of historical congruence are also interpreted as direct evidence against the hypothesis that diversification of the forest biota was a consequence of parapatric differentiation along recently established ecological gradients.

313 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explored the similarities and differences between results from 22 character weighting schemes when applied to a study of barbet and toucan phylogenetic relationships and found that some phylogenetic hypotheses were consistently supported despite the wide range of weights employed.
Abstract: The development of new schemes for weighting DNA sequence data for phylogenetic analysis continues to outpace the development of consensus on the most appropriate weights. The present study is an exploration of the similarities and differences between results from 22 character weighting schemes when applied to a study of barbet and toucan (traditional avian families Capitonidae and Ramphastidae) phylogenetic relationships. The dataset comprises cytochrome b sequences for representatives of all toucan and Neotropical barbet genera, as well as for several genera of Paleotropical barbets. The 22 weighting schemes produced conflicting patterns of relationship among taxa, often with conflicting patterns each receiving strong bootstrap support. Use of multiple weighting schemes helped to identify the source within the dataset (codon position, transitions, transversions) of the various putative phylogenetic signals. Importantly, some phylogenetic hypotheses were consistently supported despite the wide range of weights employed. The use of phylogenetic frameworks to summarize the results of these multiple analyses proved very informative. Relationships among barbets and toucans inferred from these data support the paraphyly of the traditional Capitonidae. Additionally, these data support paraphyly of Neotropical barbets, but rather than indicating a relationship between Semnornis and toucans, as previously suggested by morphological data, most analyses indicate a basal position of Semnornis within the Neotropical radiation. The cytochrome b data also allow inference of relationships among toucans. Supported hypotheses include Ramphastos as the sister to all other toucans, a close relationship of Baillonius and Pteroglossus with these two genera as the sister group to an (Andigena, Selenidera) clade, and the latter four genera as a sister group to Aulacorhynchus.

48 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Estimated divergence times for lowland Amazonian Selenidera did not support the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) refuge hypothesis as an important biogeographic factor for the diversification of lineages studied here, but the timing of divergence within Selenidersa is consistent with the hypothesis that geographic isolation of areas of endemism generated by Amazonian river dynamics during the Plio-Pleistocene contributed to SelenIDERa speciation and current species distributions.
Abstract: Andean uplift, Plio-Pleistocene climatic fluctuation, and river dynamics in the Amazon basin have all been implicated in the diversification of the South American avifauna. We reconstructed phylogenetic relationships in the genus Selenidera, which has served as a classic case of putative refugial speciation, and the closely related genus Andigena, to better understand the processes driving their diversification. Using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences, we constructed a phylogeny to estimate the pattern and timing of divergence within and between seven lowland Selenidera toucanets and the five species of Andigena mountain-toucans, which together form a single clade. All phylogenetic analyses supported the monophyly of the montane genus Andigena, but indicated that the genus Selenidera is likely paraphyletic with respect to Andigena. Our time tree analysis is consistent with the orogenic uplift of the northern Andean range having initiated the divergence between Selenidera and Andigena, and that the movement and fragmentation of montane habitats in response to Pleistocene climatic oscillations likely influenced diversification within Andigena. Estimated divergence times for lowland Amazonian Selenidera did not support the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) refuge hypothesis as an important biogeographic factor for the diversification of lineages studied here. The timing of divergence within Selenidera is consistent with the hypothesis that geographic isolation of areas of endemism generated by Amazonian river dynamics during the Plio-Pleistocene contributed to Selenidera speciation and current species distributions.

31 citations

01 Jan 1988
TL;DR: Congruence in geographical patterns of speciation for four clades of birds having taxa endemic to the same areas within the Neotropics is documents, interpreted as direct evidence against the hypothesis that diversification of the forest biota was a consequence of parapatric differentiation along recently established ecological gradients.
Abstract: This paper documents congruence in geographical patterns of speciation for four clades of birds having taxa endemic to the same areas within the Neotropics. Two genera, Pionopsitta parrots and Selenidera toucans, corroborate a well known biogeographic disjunction in which taxa endemic to southern Central America and the Choc6 region of northwestern South America are the sister-group to a radiation within the Amazon basin. These two genera, along with two lineages within the toucan genus Pteroglossus, also document a pattern of historical interrelationships for four well known areas of endemism within Amazonia: Guyanan + (Bel&m-Para + (Inambari - Napo)). These generalized historical patterns are interpreted to have arisen via fragmentation (vicariance) of a widespread ancestral biota. A review of the paleogeographic evidence suggests that these vicariance events could have originated as a result of several different mechanisms operating at various times during the Cenozoic. The inference that diversification of the Neotropical biota is primarily the result of the most recent of these possible vicariance events, namely isolation within Quaternary forest refugia, is unwarranted, given present data. These patterns of historical congru- ence are also interpreted as direct evidence against the hypothesis that diversification of the forest biota was a consequence of parapatric differentiation along recently established ecological gradients.

2 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20131
20001
19882