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Service system

About: Service system is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 15736 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 209990 citation(s).


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Summary The creation of value is the core purpose and central process of economic exchange. Traditional models of value creation focus on the firm’s output and price. We present an alternative perspective, one representing the intersection of two growing streams of thought, service science and service-dominant (S-D) logic. We take the view that (1) service, the application of competences (such as knowledge and skills) by one party for the benefit of another, is the underlying basis of exchange; (2) the proper unit of analysis for service-for-service exchange is the service system, which is a configuration of resources (including people, information, and technology) connected to other systems by value propositions; and (3) service science is the study of service systems and of the co-creation of value within complex configurations of resources. We argue that value is fundamentally derived and determined in use – the integration and application of resources in a specific context – rather than in exchange – embedded in firm output and captured by price. Service systems interact through mutual service exchange relationships, improving the adaptability and survivability of all service systems engaged in exchange, by allowing integration of resources that are mutually beneficial. This argument has implications for advancing service science by identifying research questions regarding configurations and processes of value co-creation and measurements of value-in-use, and by developing its ties with economics and other service-oriented disciplines.

2,598 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
10 Dec 2003
TL;DR: This paper introduces an extended service oriented architecture that provides separate tiers for composing and coordinating services and for managing services in an open marketplace by employing grid services.
Abstract: Service-oriented computing (SOC) is the computing paradigm that utilizes services as fundamental elements for developing applications/solutions. To build the service model, SOC relies on the service oriented architecture (SOA), which is a way of reorganizing software applications and infrastructure into a set of interacting services. However, the basic SOA does not address overarching concerns such as management, service orchestration, service transaction management and coordination, security, and other concerns that apply to all components in a service architecture. In this paper we introduce an extended service oriented architecture that provides separate tiers for composing and coordinating services and for managing services in an open marketplace by employing grid services.

1,418 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A science of service systems could provide theory and practice around service innovation in the service sector.
Abstract: The service sector accounts for most of the world's economic activity, but it's the least-studied part of the economy. A service system comprises people and technologies that adaptively compute and adjust to a system's changing value of knowledge. A science of service systems could provide theory and practice around service innovation

1,242 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
20 May 2003
TL;DR: This paper proposes a global planning approach to optimally select component services during the execution of a composite service, and experimental results show that thisglobal planning approach outperforms approaches in which the component services are selected individually for each task in a Composite service.
Abstract: The process-driven composition of Web services is emerging as a promising approach to integrate business applications within and across organizational boundaries. In this approach, individual Web services are federated into composite Web services whose business logic is expressed as a process model. The tasks of this process model are essentially invocations to functionalities offered by the underlying component services. Usually, several component services are able to execute a given task, although with different levels of pricing and quality. In this paper, we advocate that the selection of component services should be carried out during the execution of a composite service, rather than at design-time. In addition, this selection should consider multiple criteria (e.g., price, duration, reliability), and it should take into account global constraints and preferences set by the user (e.g., budget constraints). Accordingly, the paper proposes a global planning approach to optimally select component services during the execution of a composite service. Service selection is formulated as an optimization problem which can be solved using efficient linear programming methods. Experimental results show that this global planning approach outperforms approaches in which the component services are selected individually for each task in a composite service.

1,217 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
25 Mar 2012
TL;DR: A time-average age metric is employed for the performance evaluation of status update systems and the existence of an optimal rate at which a source must generate its information to keep its status as timely as possible at all its monitors is shown.
Abstract: Increasingly ubiquitous communication networks and connectivity via portable devices have engendered a host of applications in which sources, for example people and environmental sensors, send updates of their status to interested recipients. These applications desire status updates at the recipients to be as timely as possible; however, this is typically constrained by limited network resources. In this paper, we employ a time-average age metric for the performance evaluation of status update systems. We derive general methods for calculating the age metric that can be applied to a broad class of service systems. We apply these methods to queue-theoretic system abstractions consisting of a source, a service facility and monitors, with the model of the service facility (physical constraints) a given. The queue discipline of first-come-first-served (FCFS) is explored. We show the existence of an optimal rate at which a source must generate its information to keep its status as timely as possible at all its monitors. This rate differs from those that maximize utilization (throughput) or minimize status packet delivery delay. While our abstractions are simpler than their real-world counterparts, the insights obtained, we believe, are a useful starting point in understanding and designing systems that support real time status updates.

1,200 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20224
2021357
2020583
2019862
2018882
2017915