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Shortest path problem

About: Shortest path problem is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 16626 publications have been published within this topic receiving 312895 citations. The topic is also known as: single-pair shortest path problem.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The procedure was originally programmed in FORTRAN for the Control Data 160 desk-size computer and was limited to te t ra t ion because subroutine recursiveness in CONTROL Data 160 FORTRan has been held down to four levels in the interests of economy.
Abstract: procedure ari thmetic (a, b, c, op); in t eger a, b, c, op; ¢ o n l m e n t This procedure will perform different order ar i thmetic operations with b and c, put t ing the result in a. The order of the operation is given by op. For op = 1 addit ion is performed. For op = 2 multiplicaLion, repeated addition, is done. Beyond these the operations are non-commutat ive. For op = 3 exponentiat ion, repeated multiplication, is done, raising b to the power c. Beyond these the question of grouping is important . The innermost implied parentheses are at the right. The hyper-exponent is always c. For op = 4 te t ra t ion, repeated exponentiat ion, is done. For op = 5, 6, 7, etc., the procedure performs pentat ion, hexation, heptat ion, etc., respectively. The routine was originally programmed in FORTRAN for the Control Data 160 desk-size computer. The original program was limited to te t ra t ion because subroutine recursiveness in Control Data 160 FORTRAN has been held down to four levels in the interests of economy. The input parameter , b, c, and op, must be positive integers, not zero; b e g i n own i n t e g e r d, e, f, drop; i f o p = 1 t h e n b e g i n a := h-4c; go t o l e n d i f o p = 2 t h e n d := 0; else d := 1; e := c; drop := op 1; for f := I s t e p 1 u n t i l e do b e g i n ari thmetic (a, b, d, drop);

3,848 citations

Book
01 Jan 1977
TL;DR: This chapter discusses the complexity of the Simplex Algorithms and their applications in linear algebra, convex analysis, and Polyhedral Sets.
Abstract: One: Introduction.Two: Linear Algebra, Convex Analysis, and Polyhedral Sets.Three: The Simplex Method.Four: Starting Solution and Convergence.Five: Special Simplex Implementations and Optimality Conditions.Six: Duality and Sensitivity Analysis.Seven: The Decomposition Principle.Eight: Complexity of the Simplex Algorithms.Nine: Minimal-Cost Network Flows.Ten: The Transportation and Assignment Problems.Eleven: The Out-of-Kilter Algorithm.Twelve: Maximal Flow, Shortest Path, Multicommodity Flow, and Network Synthesis Problems.Bibliography.Index.

2,237 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
14 Sep 2003
TL;DR: It is shown that the routes derived from the analysis often yield noticeably better throughput than the default shortest path routes even in the presence of uncoordinated packet transmissions and MAC contention, suggesting that there is opportunity for achieving throughput gains by employing an interference-aware routing protocol.
Abstract: In this paper, we address the following question: given a specific placement of wireless nodes in physical space and a specific traffic workload, what is the maximum throughput that can be supported by the resulting network? Unlike previous work that has focused on computing asymptotic performance bounds under assumptions of homogeneity or randomness in the network topology and/or workload, we work with any given network and workload specified as inputs.A key issue impacting performance is wireless interference between neighboring nodes. We model such interference using a conflict graph, and present methods for computing upper and lower bounds on the optimal throughput for the given network and workload. To compute these bounds, we assume that packet transmissions at the individual nodes can be finely controlled and carefully scheduled by an omniscient and omnipotent central entity, which is unrealistic. Nevertheless, using ns-2 simulations, we show that the routes derived from our analysis often yield noticeably better throughput than the default shortest path routes even in the presence of uncoordinated packet transmissions and MAC contention. This suggests that there is opportunity for achieving throughput gains by employing an interference-aware routing protocol.

1,828 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work proposes a robust integer programming problem of moderately larger size that allows controlling the degree of conservatism of the solution in terms of probabilistic bounds on constraint violation, and proposes an algorithm for robust network flows that solves the robust counterpart by solving a polynomial number of nominal minimum cost flow problems in a modified network.
Abstract: We propose an approach to address data uncertainty for discrete optimization and network flow problems that allows controlling the degree of conservatism of the solution, and is computationally tractable both practically and theoretically. In particular, when both the cost coefficients and the data in the constraints of an integer programming problem are subject to uncertainty, we propose a robust integer programming problem of moderately larger size that allows controlling the degree of conservatism of the solution in terms of probabilistic bounds on constraint violation. When only the cost coefficients are subject to uncertainty and the problem is a 0−1 discrete optimization problem on n variables, then we solve the robust counterpart by solving at most n+1 instances of the original problem. Thus, the robust counterpart of a polynomially solvable 0−1 discrete optimization problem remains polynomially solvable. In particular, robust matching, spanning tree, shortest path, matroid intersection, etc. are polynomially solvable. We also show that the robust counterpart of an NP-hard α-approximable 0−1 discrete optimization problem, remains α-approximable. Finally, we propose an algorithm for robust network flows that solves the robust counterpart by solving a polynomial number of nominal minimum cost flow problems in a modified network.

1,747 citations

Book
29 Jun 1988
TL;DR: John Canny resolves long-standing problems concerning the complexity of motion planning and, for the central problem of finding a collision free path for a jointed robot in the presence of obstacles, obtains exponential speedups over existing algorithms by applying high-powered new mathematical techniques.
Abstract: The Complexity of Robot Motion Planning makes original contributions both to robotics and to the analysis of algorithms. In this groundbreaking monograph John Canny resolves long-standing problems concerning the complexity of motion planning and, for the central problem of finding a collision free path for a jointed robot in the presence of obstacles, obtains exponential speedups over existing algorithms by applying high-powered new mathematical techniques.Canny's new algorithm for this "generalized movers' problem," the most-studied and basic robot motion planning problem, has a single exponential running time, and is polynomial for any given robot. The algorithm has an optimal running time exponent and is based on the notion of roadmaps - one-dimensional subsets of the robot's configuration space. In deriving the single exponential bound, Canny introduces and reveals the power of two tools that have not been previously used in geometric algorithms: the generalized (multivariable) resultant for a system of polynomials and Whitney's notion of stratified sets. He has also developed a novel representation of object orientation based on unnormalized quaternions which reduces the complexity of the algorithms and enhances their practical applicability.After dealing with the movers' problem, the book next attacks and derives several lower bounds on extensions of the problem: finding the shortest path among polyhedral obstacles, planning with velocity limits, and compliant motion planning with uncertainty. It introduces a clever technique, "path encoding," that allows a proof of NP-hardness for the first two problems and then shows that the general form of compliant motion planning, a problem that is the focus of a great deal of recent work in robotics, is non-deterministic exponential time hard. Canny proves this result using a highly original construction.John Canny received his doctorate from MIT And is an assistant professor in the Computer Science Division at the University of California, Berkeley. The Complexity of Robot Motion Planning is the winner of the 1987 ACM Doctoral Dissertation Award.

1,538 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2023262
2022768
2021685
2020825
20191,007
2018907