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Signature recognition

About: Signature recognition is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 2138 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 37605 citation(s).


Papers
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Dec 2008
Abstract: Summary form only given. Biometrics refers to the automatic identification (or verification) of an individual (or a claimed identity) by using certain physical or behavioral traits associated with the person. By using biometrics it is possible to establish an identity based on `who you are?, rather than by `what you possess? (e.g., an ID card) or `what you remember? (e.g., a password). Therefore, biometric systems use fingerprints, hand geometry, iris, retina, face, vasculature patterns, signature, gait, palmprint, or voiceprint to determine a person?s identity. The purpose of this tutorial is two-fold: (a) to introduce the fundamentals of biometric technology from a pattern recognition and signal processing perspective by discussing some of the prominent techniques used in the field; and (b) to convey the recent advances made in this field especially in the context of security, privacy and forensics. To this end, the design of a biometric system will be discussed from the viewpoint of four commonly used biometric modalities - fingerprint, face, hand, and iris. Various algorithms that have been developed for processing these modalities will be presented. Methods to protect the biometric templates of enrolled users will also be outlined. In particular, the possibility of performing biometric matching in the cryptographic domain will be discussed. The tutorial will also introduce concepts in biometric fusion (i.e., multibiometrics) in which multiple sources of biometric information are consolidated. Finally, there will be a discussion on some of the challenges encountered by biometric systems when operating in a real-world environment and some of the methods used to address these challenges.

703 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Experiments on a database containing a total of 1232 signatures of 102 individuals show that writer-dependent thresholds yield better results than using a common threshold.
Abstract: We describe a method for on-line handwritten signature verification. The signatures are acquired using a digitizing tablet which captures both dynamic and spatial information of the writing. After preprocessing the signature, several features are extracted. The authenticity of a writer is determined by comparing an input signature to a stored reference set (template) consisting of three signatures. The similarity between an input signature and the reference set is computed using string matching and the similarity value is compared to a threshold. Several approaches for obtaining the optimal threshold value from the reference set are investigated. The best result yields a false reject rate of 2.8% and a false accept rate of 1.6%. Experiments on a database containing a total of 1232 signatures of 102 individuals show that writer-dependent thresholds yield better results than using a common threshold.

584 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is found that recognition performance is not significantly different between the face and the ear, for example, 70.5 percent versus 71.6 percent in one experiment and multimodal recognition using both the ear and face results in statistically significant improvement over either individual biometric.
Abstract: Researchers have suggested that the ear may have advantages over the face for biometric recognition. Our previous experiments with ear and face recognition, using the standard principal component analysis approach, showed lower recognition performance using ear images. We report results of similar experiments on larger data sets that are more rigorously controlled for relative quality of face and ear images. We find that recognition performance is not significantly different between the face and the ear, for example, 70.5 percent versus 71.6 percent, respectively, in one experiment. We also find that multimodal recognition using both the ear and face results in statistically significant improvement over either individual biometric, for example, 90.9 percent in the analogous experiment.

565 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The two most popular biometric techniques are focused on: fingerprints and iris scans, which are used increasingly as a hedge against identity theft.
Abstract: In this age of digital impersonation, biometric techniques are being used increasingly as a hedge against identity theft. The premise is that a biometric - a measurable physical characteristic or behavioral trait - is a more reliable indicator of identity than legacy systems such as passwords and PINs. There are three general ways to identify yourself to a computer system, based on what you know, what you have, or who you are. Biometrics belong to the "who you are" class and can be subdivided into behavioral and physiological approaches. Behavioral approaches include signature recognition, voice recognition, keystroke dynamics, and gait analysis. Physiological approaches include fingerprints; iris and retina scans; hand, finger, face, and ear geometry; hand vein and nail bed recognition; DNA; and palm prints. In this article, we focus on the two most popular biometric techniques: fingerprints and iris scans.

410 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A new method based on amplitude modulation is presented that has shown to be resistant to both classical attacks, such as filtering, and geometrical attacks and can be extracted without the original image.
Abstract: Watermarking techniques, also referred to as digital signature, sign images by introducing changes that are imperceptible to the human eye but easily recoverable by a computer program. Generally, the signature is a number which identifies the owner of the image. The locations in the image where the signature is embedded are determined by a secret key. Doing so prevents possible pirates from easily removing the signature. Furthermore, it should be possible to retrieve the signature from an altered image. Possible alternations of signed images include blurring, compression and geometrical transformations such as rotation and translation. These alterations are referred to as attacks. A new method based on amplitude modulation is presented. Single signature bits are multiply embedded by modifying pixel values in the blue channel. These modifications are either additive or subtractive, depending on the value of the bit, and proportional to the luminance. This new method has shown to be resistant to both classical attacks, such as filtering, and geometrical attacks. Moreover, the signature can be extracted without the original image.

408 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202122
202028
201925
201832
201764
2016114