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SISAL

About: SISAL is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 1878 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 55528 citation(s).


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01 Sep 2001
Abstract: In this work, natural fibres (sisal, kenaf, hemp, jute and coir) reinforced polypropylene composites were processed by compression moulding using a film stacking method. The mechanical properties of the different natural fibre composites were tested and compared. A further comparison was made with the corresponding properties of glass mat reinforced polypropylene composites from the open literature. Kenaf, hemp and sisal composites showed comparable tensile strength and modulus results but in impact properties hemp appears to out-perform kenaf. The tensile modulus, impact strength and the ultimate tensile stress of kenaf reinforced polypropylene composites were found to increase with increasing fibre weight fraction. Coir fibre composites displayed the lowest mechanical properties, but their impact strength was higher than that of jute and kenaf composites. In most cases the specific properties of the natural fibre composites were found to compare favourably with those of glass.

1,963 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: In this work, natural fibres (sisal, kenaf, hemp, jute and coir) reinforced polypropylene composites were processed by compression moulding using a film stacking method The mechanical properties of the different natural fibre composites were tested and compared A further comparison was made with the corresponding properties of glass mat reinforced polypropylene composites from the open literature Kenaf, hemp and sisal composites showed comparable tensile strength and modulus results but in impact properties hemp appears to out-perform kenaf The tensile modulus, impact strength and the ultimate tensile stress of kenaf reinforced polypropylene composites were found to increase with increasing fibre weight fraction Coir fibre composites displayed the lowest mechanical properties, but their impact strength was higher than that of jute and kenaf composites In most cases the specific properties of the natural fibre composites were found to compare favourably with those of glass

1,955 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Plant fibers are rich in cellulose and they are a cheap, easily renewable source of fibers with the potential for polymer reinforcement. The presence of surface impurities and the large amount of hydroxyl groups make plant fibers less attractive for reinforcement of polymeric materials. Hemp, sisal, jute, and kapok fibers were subjected to alkalization by using sodium hydroxide. The thermal characteristics, crystallinity index, reactivity, and surface morphology of untreated and chemically modified fibers have been studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (WAXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Following alkalization the DSC showed a rapid degradation of the cellulose between 0.8 and 8% NaOH, beyond which degradation was found to be marginal. There was a marginal drop in the crystallinity index of hemp fiber while sisal, jute, and kapok fibers showed a slight increase in crystallinity at caustic soda concentration of 0.8–30%. FTIR showed that kapok fiber was found to be the most reactive followed by jute, sisal, and then hemp fiber. SEM showed a relatively smooth surface for all the untreated fibers; however, after alkalization, all the fibers showed uneven surfaces. These results show that alkalization modifies plant fibers promoting the development of fiber–resin adhesion, which then will result in increased interfacial energy and, hence, improvement in the mechanical and thermal stability of the composites. © 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci 84: 2222–2234, 2002

1,222 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: In this work a study on the feasibility of extracting cellulose from sisal fiber, by means of two different procedures was carried out. These processes included usual chemical procedures such as acid hydrolysis, chlorination, alkaline extraction, and bleaching. The final products were characterized by means of Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM). The extraction procedures that were used led to purified cellulose. Advantages and disadvantages of both procedures were also analyzed. Finally, nanocellulose was produced by the acid hydrolysis of obtained cellulose and characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM).

994 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Sisal fibre is a promising reinforcement for use in composites on account of its low cost, low density, high specific strength and modulus, no health risk, easy availability in some countries and renewability. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in finding new applications for sisal-fibre-reinforced composites that are traditionally used for making ropes, mats, carpets, fancy articles and others. This review presents a summary of recent developments of sisal fibre and its composites. The properties of sisal fibre itself, interface between sisal fibre and matrix, properties of sisal-fibre-reinforced composites and their hybrid composites have been reviewed. Suggestions for future work are also given.

946 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20222
2021150
2020127
2019145
2018141
2017161