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Slip ratio

About: Slip ratio is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 2968 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 57164 citation(s).


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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Micron-resolution particle image velocimetry is used to measure the velocity profiles of water flowing through 30×300 μm channels. The velocity profiles are measured to within 450 nm of the microchannel surface. When the surface is hydrophilic (uncoated glass), the measured velocity profiles are consistent with solutions of Stokes’ equation and the well-accepted no-slip boundary condition. However, when the microchannel surface is coated with a 2.3 nm thick monolayer of hydrophobic octadecyltrichlorosilane, an apparent velocity slip is measured just above the solid surface. This velocity is approximately 10% of the free-stream velocity and yields a slip length of approximately 1 μm. For this slip length, slip flow is negligible for length scales greater than 1 mm, but must be considered at the micro- and nano scales.

865 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
S. M. Zivi1
Abstract: An analysis of steam-void fraction in two-phase flow is carried out, utilizing the principle that in a steady-state thermodynamic process the rate of entropy production is minimum. The two-phase flow is idealized in the analysis to be a truly steady-state process. The effects of liquid entrainment and wall friction on the void fraction and slip ratio are evaluated. It is found that the slip-ratio in an idealized two-phase flow with zero wall friction and zero entrainment equals (ρf /ρg )1/3 . Data from a number of experiments are found to be bracketed between this result and the result obtained by assuming complete entrainment (slip ratio = 1).

747 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: With increasing flow rate and partially wetted surfaces, hydrodynamic forces became up to 2-4 orders of magnitude less than expected by assuming the no-slip boundary condition that is commonly stated in textbooks.
Abstract: Newtonian fluids were placed between molecularly smooth surfaces whose spacing was vibrated at spacings where the fluid responded as a continuum. Hydrodynamic forces agreed with predictions from the no-slip boundary condition only provided that flow rate (peak velocity normalized by spacing) was low, but implied partial slip when it exceeded a critical level, different in different systems, correlated with contact angle (surface wettability). With increasing flow rate and partially wetted surfaces, hydrodynamic forces became up to 2--4 orders of magnitude less than expected by assuming the no-slip boundary condition that is commonly stated in textbooks.

580 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is shown that the surface roughness and the strength of the fluid-surface interactions both act on wall slip, in antagonist ways, which is thought to be the first direct experimental evidence of noticeable slip at the wall.
Abstract: The boundary condition for the flow velocity of a Newtonian fluid near a solid wall has been probed experimentally with a novel setup using total internal reflection-fluorescence recovery after photobleaching leading to a resolution from the wall of the order of 80 nm. For hexadecane flowing on a hydrocarbon/lyophobic smooth surface, we give what we think to be the first direct experimental evidence of noticeable slip at the wall. We show that the surface roughness and the strength of the fluid-surface interactions both act on wall slip, in antagonist ways.

545 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: The slip effects of water flow in hydrophilic and hydrophobic microchannels of 1 and 2 μm depth are examined experimentally. High-precision microchannels were treated chemically to enhance their hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties. The flow rates of pure water at various applied pressure differences for each surface condition were measured using a high-precision flow metering system and compared to a theoretical model that allows for a slip velocity at the solid surface. The slip length was found to vary approximately linearly with the shear rate with values of approximately 30 nm for the flow of water over hydrophobic surfaces at a shear rate of 105 s−1. The existence of slip over the hydrophilic surface remains uncertain, due to the sensitivity of the current analysis to nanometer uncertainties in the channel height.

468 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20223
202134
202058
201961
201879
2017152