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Smokeless tobacco

About: Smokeless tobacco is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 4077 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 101334 citation(s). The topic is also known as: Tobacco, Smokeless.

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Book
01 Apr 2014-
TL;DR: The impacts of tobacco, obesity, and infections are just part of a broad spectrum of other agents and risk factors that contribute to cancer development and that, together, influence the striking geographical heterogeneity in incidence rates.

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Abstract: The impacts of tobacco, obesity, and infections are just part of a broad spectrum of other agents and risk factors that contribute to cancer development and that, together, influence the striking geographical heterogeneity in incidence rates Certain of these risk factors are non-modifiable, for example race, familial genetic background, and reproductive and hormonal history Exposure to carcinogens may result from what are often characterized as lifestyle choices, which include alcohol consumption and behaviour in relation to avoidable sun exposure Includes chapters: 22 Tobacco smoking and smokeless tobacco use Genetic susceptibility to tobacco-related cancers p88 23 Alcohol consumption p96 41 Changing behaviours – tobacco control Australia’s plain packaging of tobacco products Tobacco and China p268

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1,292 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Koon K. Teo1, Stephanie Ôunpuu1, Steven Hawken1, Pandey2  +8 moreInstitutions (6)
19 Aug 2006-The Lancet
TL;DR: All forms of tobacco use, including different types of smoking and chewing tobacco and inhalation of SHS, should be discouraged to prevent cardiovascular diseases.

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Abstract: Summary Background Tobacco use is one of the major avoidable causes of cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to assess the risks associated with tobacco use (both smoking and non-smoking) and second hand tobacco smoke (SHS) worldwide. Methods We did a standardised case-control study of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with 27 089 participants in 52 countries (12 461 cases, 14 637 controls). We assessed relation between risk of AMI and current or former smoking, type of tobacco, amount smoked, effect of smokeless tobacco, and exposure to SHS. We controlled for confounders such as differences in lifestyles between smokers and non-smokers. Findings Current smoking was associated with a greater risk of non-fatal AMI (odds ratio [OR] 2·95, 95% CI 2·77–3·14, p 21 h per week). Young male current smokers had the highest population attributable risk (58·3%; 95% CI 55·0–61·6) and older women the lowest (6·2%, 4·1–9·2). Population attributable risk for exposure to SHS for more than 1 h per week in never smokers was 15·4% (12·1–19·3). Conclusion Tobacco use is one of the most important causes of AMI globally, especially in men. All forms of tobacco use, including different types of smoking and chewing tobacco and inhalation of SHS, should be discouraged to prevent cardiovascular diseases.

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848 citations


Journal Article
TL;DR: Four million middle and high school students continue to be exposed to harmful tobacco product constituents, including nicotine, and between 2011 and 2014, statistically significant increases were observed among these students for current use of both e-cigarettes and hookahs, while decreases were observed forCurrent use of more traditional products, such as cigarettes and cigars, resulting in no change in overall tobacco use.

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Abstract: Tobacco use and addiction most often begin during youth and young adulthood. Youth use of tobacco in any form is unsafe. To determine the prevalence and trends of current (past 30-day) use of nine tobacco products (cigarettes, cigars, smokeless tobacco, e-cigarettes, hookahs, tobacco pipes, snus, dissolvable tobacco, and bidis) among U.S. middle (grades 6-8) and high school (grades 9-12) students, CDC and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) analyzed data from the 2011-2014 National Youth Tobacco Surveys (NYTS). In 2014, e-cigarettes were the most commonly used tobacco product among middle (3.9%) and high (13.4%) school students. Between 2011 and 2014, statistically significant increases were observed among these students for current use of both e-cigarettes and hookahs (p<0.05), while decreases were observed for current use of more traditional products, such as cigarettes and cigars, resulting in no change in overall tobacco use. Consequently, 4.6 million middle and high school students continue to be exposed to harmful tobacco product constituents, including nicotine. Nicotine exposure during adolescence, a critical window for brain development, might have lasting adverse consequences for brain development, causes addiction, and might lead to sustained tobacco use. For this reason, comprehensive and sustained strategies are needed to prevent and reduce the use of all tobacco products among youths in the United States.

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769 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
18 Aug 2015-JAMA
TL;DR: Those who had ever used e-cigarettes at baseline compared with nonusers were more likely to report initiation of combustible tobacco use over the next year, and further research is needed to understand whether this association may be causal.

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Abstract: Importance Exposure to nicotine in electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) is becoming increasingly common among adolescents who report never having smoked combustible tobacco. Objective To evaluate whether e-cigarette use among 14-year-old adolescents who have never tried combustible tobacco is associated with risk of initiating use of 3 combustible tobacco products (ie, cigarettes, cigars, and hookah). Design, Setting, and Participants Longitudinal repeated assessment of a school-based cohort at baseline (fall 2013, 9th grade, mean age = 14.1 years) and at a 6-month follow-up (spring 2014, 9th grade) and a 12-month follow-up (fall 2014, 10th grade). Ten public high schools in Los Angeles, California, were recruited through convenience sampling. Participants were students who reported never using combustible tobacco at baseline and completed follow-up assessments at 6 or 12 months (N = 2530). At each time point, students completed self-report surveys during in-classroom data collections. Exposure Student self-report of whether he or she ever used e-cigarettes (yes or no) at baseline. Main Outcomes and Measures Six- and 12-month follow-up reports on use of any of the following tobacco products within the prior 6 months: (1) any combustible tobacco product (yes or no); (2) combustible cigarettes (yes or no), (3) cigars (yes or no); (4) hookah (yes or no); and (5) number of combustible tobacco products (range: 0-3). Results Past 6-month use of any combustible tobacco product was more frequent in baseline e-cigarette ever users (n = 222) than never users (n = 2308) at the 6-month follow-up (30.7% vs 8.1%, respectively; difference between groups in prevalence rates, 22.7% [95% CI, 16.4%-28.9%]) and at the 12-month follow-up (25.2% vs 9.3%, respectively; difference between groups, 15.9% [95% CI, 10.0%-21.8%]). Baseline e-cigarette use was associated with greater likelihood of use of any combustible tobacco product averaged across the 2 follow-up periods in the unadjusted analyses (odds ratio [OR], 4.27 [95% CI, 3.19-5.71]) and in the analyses adjusted for sociodemographic, environmental, and intrapersonal risk factors for smoking (OR, 2.73 [95% CI, 2.00-3.73]). Product-specific analyses showed that baseline e-cigarette use was positively associated with combustible cigarette (OR, 2.65 [95% CI, 1.73-4.05]), cigar (OR, 4.85 [95% CI, 3.38-6.96]), and hookah (OR, 3.25 [95% CI, 2.29-4.62]) use and with the number of different combustible products used (OR, 4.26 [95% CI, 3.16-5.74]) averaged across the 2 follow-up periods. Conclusions and Relevance Among high school students in Los Angeles, those who had ever used e-cigarettes at baseline compared with nonusers were more likely to report initiation of combustible tobacco use over the next year. Further research is needed to understand whether this association may be causal.

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679 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1968-Chemical Reviews

659 citations


Network Information
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20221
2021211
2020227
2019239
2018223
2017188

Top Attributes

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Topic's top 5 most impactful authors

Herbert H. Severson

66 papers, 2.2K citations

Dorothy K. Hatsukami

66 papers, 2.7K citations

Prakash C. Gupta

56 papers, 3.5K citations

Dhirendra N Sinha

44 papers, 1K citations

Stephen S. Hecht

30 papers, 2.1K citations