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Social graph

About: Social graph is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 1673 publications have been published within this topic receiving 43587 citations.


Papers
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
04 Feb 2010
TL;DR: This paper proposes models and algorithms for learning the model parameters and for testing the learned models to make predictions, and develops techniques for predicting the time by which a user may be expected to perform an action.
Abstract: Recently, there has been tremendous interest in the phenomenon of influence propagation in social networks. The studies in this area assume they have as input to their problems a social graph with edges labeled with probabilities of influence between users. However, the question of where these probabilities come from or how they can be computed from real social network data has been largely ignored until now. Thus it is interesting to ask whether from a social graph and a log of actions by its users, one can build models of influence. This is the main problem attacked in this paper. In addition to proposing models and algorithms for learning the model parameters and for testing the learned models to make predictions, we also develop techniques for predicting the time by which a user may be expected to perform an action. We validate our ideas and techniques using the Flickr data set consisting of a social graph with 1.3M nodes, 40M edges, and an action log consisting of 35M tuples referring to 300K distinct actions. Beyond showing that there is genuine influence happening in a real social network, we show that our techniques have excellent prediction performance.

1,116 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
13 May 2019
TL;DR: This paper provides a principled approach to jointly capture interactions and opinions in the user-item graph and proposes the framework GraphRec, which coherently models two graphs and heterogeneous strengths for social recommendations.
Abstract: In recent years, Graph Neural Networks (GNNs), which can naturally integrate node information and topological structure, have been demonstrated to be powerful in learning on graph data. These advantages of GNNs provide great potential to advance social recommendation since data in social recommender systems can be represented as user-user social graph and user-item graph; and learning latent factors of users and items is the key. However, building social recommender systems based on GNNs faces challenges. For example, the user-item graph encodes both interactions and their associated opinions; social relations have heterogeneous strengths; users involve in two graphs (e.g., the user-user social graph and the user-item graph). To address the three aforementioned challenges simultaneously, in this paper, we present a novel graph neural network framework (GraphRec) for social recommendations. In particular, we provide a principled approach to jointly capture interactions and opinions in the user-item graph and propose the framework GraphRec, which coherently models two graphs and heterogeneous strengths. Extensive experiments on two real-world datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework GraphRec.

1,111 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Apr 2009
TL;DR: This paper proposes the use of interaction graphs to impart meaning to online social links by quantifying user interactions, and uses both types of graphs to validate two well-known social-based applications (RE and SybilGuard).
Abstract: Social networks are popular platforms for interaction, communication and collaboration between friends. Researchers have recently proposed an emerging class of applications that leverage relationships from social networks to improve security and performance in applications such as email, web browsing and overlay routing. While these applications often cite social network connectivity statistics to support their designs, researchers in psychology and sociology have repeatedly cast doubt on the practice of inferring meaningful relationships from social network connections alone.This leads to the question: Are social links valid indicators of real user interaction? If not, then how can we quantify these factors to form a more accurate model for evaluating socially-enhanced applications? In this paper, we address this question through a detailed study of user interactions in the Facebook social network. We propose the use of interaction graphs to impart meaning to online social links by quantifying user interactions. We analyze interaction graphs derived from Facebook user traces and show that they exhibit significantly lower levels of the "small-world" properties shown in their social graph counterparts. This means that these graphs have fewer "supernodes" with extremely high degree, and overall network diameter increases significantly as a result. To quantify the impact of our observations, we use both types of graphs to validate two well-known social-based applications (RE and SybilGuard). The results reveal new insights into both systems, and confirm our hypothesis that studies of social applications should use real indicators of user interactions in lieu of social graphs.

992 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: A strong effect of age on friendship preferences as well as a globally modular community structure driven by nationality are observed, but it is shown that while the Facebook graph as a whole is clearly sparse, the graph neighborhoods of users contain surprisingly dense structure.
Abstract: We study the structure of the social graph of active Facebook users, the largest social network ever analyzed. We compute numerous features of the graph including the number of users and friendships, the degree distribution, path lengths, clustering, and mixing patterns. Our results center around three main observations. First, we characterize the global structure of the graph, determining that the social network is nearly fully connected, with 99.91% of individuals belonging to a single large connected component, and we confirm the "six degrees of separation" phenomenon on a global scale. Second, by studying the average local clustering coefficient and degeneracy of graph neighborhoods, we show that while the Facebook graph as a whole is clearly sparse, the graph neighborhoods of users contain surprisingly dense structure. Third, we characterize the assortativity patterns present in the graph by studying the basic demographic and network properties of users. We observe clear degree assortativity and characterize the extent to which "your friends have more friends than you". Furthermore, we observe a strong effect of age on friendship preferences as well as a globally modular community structure driven by nationality, but we do not find any strong gender homophily. We compare our results with those from smaller social networks and find mostly, but not entirely, agreement on common structural network characteristics.

938 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
09 Feb 2011
TL;DR: In this article, a supervised random walk algorithm is proposed to predict the occurrence of links in Facebook social networks by combining the information from the network structure with node and edge level attributes to guide a random walk on the graph.
Abstract: Predicting the occurrence of links is a fundamental problem in networks. In the link prediction problem we are given a snapshot of a network and would like to infer which interactions among existing members are likely to occur in the near future or which existing interactions are we missing. Although this problem has been extensively studied, the challenge of how to effectively combine the information from the network structure with rich node and edge attribute data remains largely open.We develop an algorithm based on Supervised Random Walks that naturally combines the information from the network structure with node and edge level attributes. We achieve this by using these attributes to guide a random walk on the graph. We formulate a supervised learning task where the goal is to learn a function that assigns strengths to edges in the network such that a random walker is more likely to visit the nodes to which new links will be created in the future. We develop an efficient training algorithm to directly learn the edge strength estimation function.Our experiments on the Facebook social graph and large collaboration networks show that our approach outperforms state-of-the-art unsupervised approaches as well as approaches that are based on feature extraction.

929 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202320
202242
202162
202086
2019111
201886