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Soil contamination

About: Soil contamination is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 23018 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 602844 citation(s). The topic is also known as: soil pollution.

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Papers
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Open accessBook
01 Apr 1990-
Abstract: General principles. Introduction. Soil processes and the behaviour of heavy metals. The origin of heavy metals in soils. Methods of analysis for heavy metals in soils. Individual elements. Arsenic. Cadmium. Chromium and nickel. Copper. Lead. Maganese and cobalt. Mercury. Selenium. Zinc. Other less abundant elements of potential environment significance. Appendices.

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Topics: Soil contamination (56%), Cadmium (54%), Mercury (element) (51%)

4,024 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1007/S10311-010-0297-8
Abstract: Metal contamination issues are becoming increasingly common in India and elsewhere, with many documented cases of metal toxicity in mining industries, foundries, smelters, coal-burning power plants and agriculture. Heavy metals, such as cadmium, copper, lead, chromium and mercury are major environmental pollutants, particularly in areas with high anthropogenic pressure. Heavy metal accumulation in soils is of concern in agricultural production due to the adverse effects on food safety and marketability, crop growth due to phytotoxicity, and environmental health of soil organisms. The influence of plants and their metabolic activities affects the geological and biological redistribution of heavy metals through pollution of the air, water and soil. This article details the range of heavy metals, their occurrence and toxicity for plants. Metal toxicity has high impact and relevance to plants and consequently it affects the ecosystem, where the plants form an integral component. Plants growing in metal-polluted sites exhibit altered metabolism, growth reduction, lower biomass production and metal accumulation. Various physiological and biochemical processes in plants are affected by metals. The contemporary investigations into toxicity and tolerance in metal-stressed plants are prompted by the growing metal pollution in the environment. A few metals, including copper, manganese, cobalt, zinc and chromium are, however, essential to plant metabolism in trace amounts. It is only when metals are present in bioavailable forms and at excessive levels, they have the potential to become toxic to plants. This review focuses mainly on zinc, cadmium, copper, mercury, chromium, lead, arsenic, cobalt, nickel, manganese and iron.

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Topics: Metal toxicity (65%), Phytoextraction process (63%), Soil contamination (56%) ...read more

2,282 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.JHAZMAT.2009.03.137
A. K. Haritash1, C.P. Kaushik1Institutions (1)
Abstract: PAHs are aromatic hydrocarbons with two or more fused benzene rings with natural as well as anthropogenic sources. They are widely distributed environmental contaminants that have detrimental biological effects, toxicity, mutagenecity and carcinogenicity. Due to their ubiquitous occurrence, recalcitrance, bioaccumulation potential and carcinogenic activity, the PAHs have gathered significant environmental concern. Although PAH may undergo adsorption, volatilization, photolysis, and chemical degradation, microbial degradation is the major degradation process. PAH degradation depends on the environmental conditions, number and type of the microorganisms, nature and chemical structure of the chemical compound being degraded. They are biodegraded/biotransformed into less complex metabolites, and through mineralization into inorganic minerals, H2O, CO2 (aerobic) or CH4 (anaerobic) and rate of biodegradation depends on pH, temperature, oxygen, microbial population, degree of acclimation, accessibility of nutrients, chemical structure of the compound, cellular transport properties, and chemical partitioning in growth medium. A number of bacterial species are known to degrade PAHs and most of them are isolated from contaminated soil or sediments. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomons fluoresens, Mycobacterium spp., Haemophilus spp., Rhodococcus spp., Paenibacillus spp. are some of the commonly studied PAH-degrading bacteria. Lignolytic fungi too have the property of PAH degradation. Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Bjerkandera adusta, and Pleurotus ostreatus are the common PAH-degrading fungi. Enzymes involved in the degradation of PAHs are oxygenase, dehydrogenase and lignolytic enzymes. Fungal lignolytic enzymes are lignin peroxidase, laccase, and manganese peroxidase. They are extracellular and catalyze radical formation by oxidation to destabilize bonds in a molecule. The biodegradation of PAHs has been observed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and the rate can be enhanced by physical/chemical pretreatment of contaminated soil. Addition of biosurfactant-producing bacteria and light oils can increase the bioavailability of PAHs and metabolic potential of the bacterial community. The supplementation of contaminated soils with compost materials can also enhance biodegradation without long-term accumulation of extractable polar and more available intermediates. Wetlands, too, have found an application in PAH removal from wastewater. The intensive biological activities in such an ecosystem lead to a high rate of autotrophic and heterotrophic processes. Aquatic weeds Typha spp. and Scirpus lacustris have been used in horizontal–vertical macrophyte based wetlands to treat PAHs. An integrated approach of physical, chemical, and biological degradation may be adopted to get synergistically enhanced removal rates and to treat/remediate the contaminated sites in an ecologically favorable process.

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Topics: Microbial biodegradation (56%), Biodegradation (54%), Rhodococcus (52%) ...read more

2,122 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/S0038-0717(97)00270-8
Abstract: An increasing body of evidence suggests that microorganisms are far more sensitive to heavy metal stress than soil animals or plants growing on the same soils. Not surprisingly, most studies of heavy metal toxicity to soil microorganisms have concentrated on effects where loss of microbial function can be observed and yet such studies may mask underlying effects on biodiversity within microbial populations and communities. The types of evidence which are available for determining critical metal concentrations or loadings for microbial processes and populations in agricultural soil are assessed, particularly in relation to the agricultural use of sewage sludge. Much of the confusion in deriving critical toxic concentrations of heavy metals in soils arises from comparison of experimental results based on short-term laboratory ecotoxicological studies with results from monitoring of long-term exposures of microbial populations to heavy metals in field experiments. The laboratory studies in effect measure responses to immediate, acute toxicity (disturbance) whereas the monitoring of field experiments measures responses to long-term chronic toxicity (stress) which accumulates gradually. Laboratory ecotoxicological studies are the most easily conducted and by far the most numerous, but are difficult to extrapolate meaningfully to toxic effects likely to occur in the field. Using evidence primarily derived from long-term field experiments, a hypothesis is formulated to explain how microorganisms may become affected by gradually increasing soil metal concentrations and this is discussed in relation to defining “safe” or “critical” soil metal loadings for soil protection.

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Topics: Metal toxicity (57%), Soil contamination (55%)

1,750 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.ENVPOL.2007.06.056
Sardar Khan1, Qin Cao1, Ying-juan Zheng1, Youda Huang1  +1 moreInstitutions (1)
Abstract: Consumption of food crops contaminated with heavy metals is a major food chain route for human exposure. We studied the health risks of heavy metals in contaminated food crops irrigated with wastewater. Results indicate that there is a substantial buildup of heavy metals in wastewater-irrigated soils, collected from Beijing, China. Heavy metal concentrations in plants grown in wastewater-irrigated soils were significantly higher (P

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  • Table 4 DIM and HRI for individual heavy metals caused by the consumption of different selected vegetables grown in wastewater-irrigated soils
    Table 4 DIM and HRI for individual heavy metals caused by the consumption of different selected vegetables grown in wastewater-irrigated soils
  • Table 2 Heavy metal transfer factors (on dry weight basis) for plants grown in wastewater-irrigated soils
    Table 2 Heavy metal transfer factors (on dry weight basis) for plants grown in wastewater-irrigated soils
  • Table 3 Pearson’s correlation coefficients (r) between the heavy metal concentrations in so
    Table 3 Pearson’s correlation coefficients (r) between the heavy metal concentrations in so
  • Table 1 Characteristics of wastewater-irrigated and reference soils collected from the study
    Table 1 Characteristics of wastewater-irrigated and reference soils collected from the study
  • Fig. 1. Heavy metal concentrations (dry weight basis) in the edible parts of plants grown in wastewater-contaminated soils: (a) Cd; (b) Cr; (c) Cu; (d) Ni; (e) Pb; and (f) Zn. The error bars indicate the standard deviation while the asterisks indicate significant differences in heavy metal concentrations between plants grown in wastewater-irrigated and reference soils, at P < 0.05 (*), P < 0.01 (**) and P < 0.001 (***), respectively.
    Fig. 1. Heavy metal concentrations (dry weight basis) in the edible parts of plants grown in wastewater-contaminated soils: (a) Cd; (b) Cr; (c) Cu; (d) Ni; (e) Pb; and (f) Zn. The error bars indicate the standard deviation while the asterisks indicate significant differences in heavy metal concentrations between plants grown in wastewater-irrigated and reference soils, at P < 0.05 (*), P < 0.01 (**) and P < 0.001 (***), respectively.
Topics: Soil contamination (56%), Environmental pollution (52%), Food chain (51%)

1,669 Citations


Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202258
20211,099
20201,282
20191,324
20181,320
20171,151

Top Attributes

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Topic's top 5 most impactful authors

Jadwiga Wyszkowska

79 papers, 1.2K citations

Jan Kucharski

62 papers, 907 citations

Steve P. McGrath

56 papers, 10.2K citations

Ravi Naidu

55 papers, 2K citations

Domen Lestan

32 papers, 1.6K citations

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