scispace - formally typeset
Topic

Solanum incanum

About: Solanum incanum is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 143 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 2268 citation(s). The topic is also known as: Nightshade.

...read more

Papers
More filters

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Of the 30 plants tested, 13 showed antifungal activity (40%) against one ore more human pathogenic fungi, and the strongest inhibition was exhibited by Azima tetracantha, Sansevieria ehrenbergii and Solanum incanum fruits.

...read more

Abstract: Ninety crude extracts, including dichloromethane, methanol and aqueous extracts from 30 medicinal plants used in the Yemeni ethnomedicine to treat common infections, were screened in vitro for antimicrobial activities against three Gram-positive bacteria and two Gram-negative bacteria, Candida maltosa and five opportunistic human fungal pathogens (two yeasts, three hyphomycetes). Most of the plants showed antibacterial activities. Extracts from Tamarindus indica flowers and Ficus vasta fruits have been the most active. Of the 30 plants tested, 13 showed antifungal activity (40%) against one ore more human pathogenic fungi. The strongest inhibition was exhibited by Azima tetracantha (fruits), Sansevieria ehrenbergii (fruits) and Solanum incanum (fruits). Ten methanol extracts, especially those of Acacia asak barks and Solanum nigrum fruits, showed effective free radical scavenging activities in the DPPH assay. Remarkable cytotoxic activity against FL-cells was shown only for five plants, among them Plicosepalus curviflorus (stems).

...read more

296 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Grafting eggplant onto interspecific eggplant hybrids, especially on the SI × SM hybrid, has proved advantageous for eggplant production, as the high vigour and good compatibility of the rootstock with scion results in improved early and total yield without negative effects on apparent fruit quality or composition.

...read more

Abstract: We propose the utilization of eggplant ( Solanum melongena L.) interspecific hybrids derived from crosses with closely related species as an approach for developing new improved rootstocks for eggplant. Here we investigate rootstock effects on fruit yield, apparent quality and proximate and mineral composition of S. melongena ‘Black Beauty’ (BB) scions grafted on interspecific hybrid rootstocks developed from crosses of S. melongena with Solanum incanum L. (SI × SM) and Solanum aethiopicum L. (SM × SA). The results are compared with non-grafted (BB control) and self-grafted (BB/BB) controls and with S. melongena ‘Black Beauty’ scions grafted onto Solanum torvum Sw. (STO) and Solanum macrocarpon L. (SMA) rootstocks. All treatments were grown in a soil naturally infested with root-knot nematodes (mostly Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid and White) Chitwood). SI × SM and SM × SA interspecific hybrids had high germination (≥90%) and total graft success (100%). Contrary to what occurred with all other treatments, no plants from scions grafted onto these hybrid rootstocks died during the experiment. In particular, the SI × SM hybrid rootstock conferred the highest vigour to the scion, which resulted in the highest values for fruit earliness and early and total yield. Little difference was observed among treatments for apparent fruit quality traits, except for a greater fruit calyx length and prickliness of fruit grafted onto SMA rootstocks. A similar result was obtained for fruit composition where phenolics content was higher in fruit from plants grafted onto SMA rootstocks. Grafting eggplant onto interspecific eggplant hybrids, especially on the SI × SM hybrid, has proved advantageous for eggplant production, as the high vigour and good compatibility of the rootstock with scion results in improved early and total yield without negative effects on apparent fruit quality or composition. Interspecific hybrids represent an alternative to the commonly used STO rootstock, which is a wild species with irregular germination.

...read more

104 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results support separate domestication of S. melongena subsp.

...read more

Abstract: The domestication history of eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) has long been debated, with studies unable to narrow down where domestication occurred within a broad region of tropical Asia. The most commonly hypothesized region is India, however China has an equally old written record of eggplant use dating ca. 2000 years before present. Both regions have a high diversity of landraces and populations of putatively wild eggplant: Solanum incanum L. in India and Solanum undatum Lam. in SE Asia. An additional complication is that there is taxonomic confusion regarding the two candidate progenitors. Here, we synthesize historic, morphologic, and molecular data (nrITS sequence and AFLP) to interpret the phylogeographic relationships among candidate progenitors and Asian eggplant landraces in order to test theories of domestication. A minimum of two domestication events is supported: one in India and one in southern China/SE Asia. Results also support separate domestication of S. melongena subsp. ovigerum, a group of morphologically distinct eggplants found in SE Asia, and suggest Asian S. incanum and S. undatum may not be genetically distinct. Routes of the spread of eggplant cultivation throughout Asia are proposed, and evolutionary relationships among allied species are discussed.

...read more

96 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
P. S. Pavithra1, V S Janani, K H Charumathi, R Indumathy  +2 moreInstitutions (1)
TL;DR: Potential use of these plants for developing new antibacterial compounds against pathogenic microorganisms is revealed and the presence of phytochemicals such as alkaloids, tannins, triterpenoids, steroids and glycosides in the extracts ofThese plants supports their traditional uses as medicinal plants for the treatment of various ailments.

...read more

Abstract: Delonix elata, Enicostemma axillare, Merremia tridentata, Mollugo cerviana and Solanum incanum are medicinal plants used in traditional Indian medicine for the treatment of various ailments. These plants were selected to evaluate their potential antibacterial activity. To determine antibacterial activity and phytochemicals in the crude extracts of five medicinal plants used in traditional Indian medicine for the treatment of various ailments like rheumatism, piles fever, skin diseases and snake bite. The antibacterial activity of organic solvent extracts of these plants were determined by disc diffusion and broth dilution techniques against grampositive bacterial strains (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus) and gram-negative bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Results revealed that the chloroform and methanol extracts of D. elata and methanol extracts of M. cerviana exhibited significant antibacterial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative strains with minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) ranging from 1.5 to 100 mg/ml. Methanol extracts of M. tridentata exhibited activity only against gram-positive bacterial strains with MBC ranging from 12.5 to 100 mg/ml. Extracts of E. axillare and S. incanum showed activity only against B. subtilis and were not bactericidal at 100 mg/ml. The most susceptible organism to the organic extracts from all the studied plants was B. subtilis and the most resistant organism was P. aeruginosa. The presence of phytochemicals such as alkaloids, tannins, triterpenoids, steroids and glycosides in the extracts of these plants supports their traditional uses as medicinal plants for the treatment of various ailments. The present study reveals potential use of these plants for developing new antibacterial compounds against pathogenic microorganisms. Key words: Antibacterial, Enicostemma axillare, Merremia tridentata, Mollugo cerviana, Solanum incanum

...read more

89 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Terri L. Weese1, Terri L. Weese2, Lynn Bohs2Institutions (2)
01 Feb 2010-Taxon
TL;DR: DNA sequence data are used to show that eggplants arose in Africa and were dispersed throughout the Middle East to Asia, providing the most comprehensive evidence to date for the evolution of the cultivated eggplant.

...read more

Abstract: The eggplant (Solanum melongena L.), also known as aubergine or brinjal, has been cultivated for centuries in the Old World and is currently a crop species of global importance. Despite this, hypotheses of eggplant evolution have been fraught with controversy. Previous conclusions have relied solely on morphological characters or have been based on insufficient taxonomic sampling, leading to conflicting opinions of the number of species, phylogenetic relationships, and patterns of domestication in a group of related taxa termed the S. melongena complex. The S. melongena complex shows a series of morphological intermedi ates from small-fruited spiny plants to large-fruited non-spiny plants. We use DNA sequence data to show that eggplants arose in Africa and were dispersed throughout the Middle East to Asia. Solanum linnaeanum, a wild species not previously associated with eggplant evolution, is a member of the S. melongena complex. These data provide the most comprehensive evidence to date for the evolution of the cultivated eggplant.

...read more

84 citations


Network Information
Related Topics (5)
Azadirachta

4.7K papers, 78.2K citations

72% related
Sambucus nigra

557 papers, 12.1K citations

72% related
Medicinal plants

3.8K papers, 108.6K citations

72% related
Bulb

2.5K papers, 19.8K citations

72% related
Ocimum

3.2K papers, 55.1K citations

71% related
Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202111
20208
20197
201810
20178
20168

Top Attributes

Show by:

Topic's top 5 most impactful authors

Jaime Prohens

8 papers, 294 citations

Pietro Gramazio

6 papers, 150 citations

Santiago Vilanova

5 papers, 144 citations

Elsadig A. Eltayeb

4 papers, 88 citations

Mariola Plazas

4 papers, 144 citations