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Sovereignty

About: Sovereignty is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 25909 publications have been published within this topic receiving 410148 citations.


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Book
01 Jan 1998
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present the logic of sovereignty and the paradox of sovereignty in the form of the human sacer and the notion of potentiality and potentiality-and-law.
Abstract: Introduction Part I. The Logic of Sovereignty: 1. The paradox of sovereignty 2. 'Nomos Basileus' 3. Potentiality and law 4. Form of law Threshold Part II. Homo Sacer: 1. Homo sacer 2. The ambivalence of the sacred 3. Sacred life 4. 'Vitae Necisque Potestas' 5. Sovereign body and sacred body 6. The ban and the wolf Threshold Part III. The Camp as Biopolitical Paradigm of the Modern: 1. The politicization of life 2. Biopolitics and the rights of man 3. Life that does not deserve to live 4. 'Politics, or giving form to the life of a people' 5. VP 6. Politicizing death 7. The camp as the 'Nomos' of the modern Threshold Bibliography Index of names.

7,589 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Oct 2003
TL;DR: In the face of the possibility that the intellectual is complicit in the persistent constitution of Other as the Self's shadow, a possibility of political practice for the intel- lectual would be to put the economic factor as irreducible as it reinscribes the social text, even as it is erased, however imperfectly, when it claims to be the final determinant or the tran- scendental signified as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Some of the most radical criticism coming out of the West today is the result of an interested desire to conserve the subject of the West, or the West as Subject. The theory of pluralized ‘subject-effects’ gives an illusion of undermining subjective sovereignty while often providing a cover for this subject of knowledge. Although the history of Europe as Subject is narrativized by the law, political economy, and ideology of the West, this concealed Subject pretends it has ‘no geo-political determinations.’ The much publicized critique of the sovereign subject thus actually inaugurates a Subject. . . . This S/subject, curiously sewn together into a transparency by denega­ tions, belongs to the exploiters’ side of the international division of labor. It is impossible for contemporary French intellectuals to imagine the kind of Power and Desire that would inhabit the unnamed subject of the Other of Europe. It is not only that everything they read, critical or uncritical, is caught within the debate of the production of that Other, supporting or critiquing the constitution of the Subject as Europe. It is also that, in the constitution of that Other of Europe, great care was taken to obliterate the textual ingredients with which such a subject could cathect, could occupy (invest?) its itinerary not only by ideological and scientific production, but also by the institution of the law. ... In the face of the possibility that the intellectual is complicit in the persistent constitution of Other as the Self’s shadow, a possibility of political practice for the intel­ lectual would be to put the economic ‘under erasure,’ to see the economic factor as irreducible as it reinscribes the social text, even as it is erased, however imperfectly, when it claims to be the final determinant or the tran­ scendental signified. The clearest available example of such epistemic violence is the remotely orchestrated, far-flung, and heterogeneous project to constitute the colonial

5,118 citations

Book
04 Oct 1999
TL;DR: The Second Edition Basic Concepts and Themes Government and Governmentality as discussed by the authors An Analytics of Government Analyzing Regimes of Government Genealogy and Government Governmentality Genealogy, Government Liberalism, Critique and 'the Social' Neo-Liberalism and Foucault Dependency and Empowerment: Two Case Studies Dependency empowerment Conclusion Pastoral power, police and reason of state Pastoral Power Reason of state and Police Conclusion Bio-Politics and Sovereignty Bio-politics Sovereignty and the Governmentalization of the State Liberalism Economy Security Law and Norm Society and Social Government Author
Abstract: Introduction to the Second Edition Basic Concepts and Themes Government and Governmentality An Analytics of Government Analyzing Regimes of Government Genealogy and Governmentality Genealogy and Government Liberalism, Critique and 'the Social' Neo-Liberalism and Foucault Dependency and Empowerment: Two Case Studies Dependency Empowerment Conclusion Pastoral Power, Police and Reason of State Pastoral Power Reason of State and Police Conclusion Bio-Politics and Sovereignty Bio-Politics Sovereignty and the Governmentalization of the State Liberalism Economy Security Law and Norm Society and Social Government Authoritarian Governmentality The Illiberality of Liberal Government Bio-Politics, Race and Non-Liberal Rule Neo-Liberalism and Advanced Liberal Government Society, Freedom and Reform Advanced Liberal Government A Post-Welfarist Regime of the Social Risk and Reflexive Government Two Approaches to Risk Risk and Reflexive Modernization Insurance and Government Reflexive Government International Governmentality Foucault and the International Building on Foucault Conclusion: 'Not Bad... but Dangerous' Postscript to the Second Edition: The Crisis of Neo-Liberal Governmentality?

5,006 citations

Book
01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that it is acceptable, even necessary, to grieve some lives, while others are not valued or are even incomprehensible as lives at all, and argue against the rhetorical use of the charge of anti-semitism to quell public debate.
Abstract: Written after September 11, 2001, in response to the conditions of heightened vulnerability and aggression that have prevailed since then, Judith Butler critiques the use of violence and argues for a response in which violence might be minimized, and interdependency becomes acknowledged as the basis for global political community. Following the expressions of public mourning post-September 11, Butler asks why it's acceptable, even necessary to grieve some lives, while others are not valued or are even incomprehensible as lives at all. Questions of sovereignty, patriotism and censorship are all examined, especially in light of the prisoners at Guantanamo Bay. Finally she investigates the way in which any criticism of the Israeli state is automatically labelled anti-semitic, thus rendering all criticism of Israel a political taboo in the US and the UK. She counters that we have a responsibility to speak out against both Israeli injustices and anti-semitism, and argues against the rhetorical use of the charge of anti-semitism to quell public debate.

4,460 citations

Book
01 Jan 1961
TL;DR: The Foundations of a Legal System as mentioned in this paper is an example of a legal system based on formalism and rule-scepticism, and it can be seen as a union of primary and secondary rules.
Abstract: Introduction 1. Persistent Questions 2. Laws, Commands, and Orders 3. The Variety of Laws 4. Sovereign and Subject 5. Law as the Union of Primary and Secondary Rules 6. The Foundations of a Legal System 7. Formalism and Rule-Scepticism 8. Justice and Morality 9. Laws and Morals 10. International Law Postscript

3,929 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20241
20231,775
20223,691
2021802
20201,086
20191,042