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Spanish Civil War

About: Spanish Civil War is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 16662 publications have been published within this topic receiving 190926 citations. The topic is also known as: Spanish War & The Spanish Civil War.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article showed that the current prevalence of internal war is mainly the result of a steady accumulation of protracted conflicts since the 1950s and 1960s rather than a sudden change associated with a new, post-Cold War international system.
Abstract: An influential conventional wisdom holds that civil wars proliferated rapidly with the end of the Cold War and that the root cause of many or most of these has been ethnic and religious antagonisms. We show that the current prevalence of internal war is mainly the result of a steady accumulation of protracted conflicts since the 1950s and 1960s rather than a sudden change associated with a new, post-Cold War international system. We also find that after controlling for per capita income, more ethnically or religiously diverse countries have been no more likely to experience significant civil violence in this period. We argue for understanding civil war in this period in terms of insurgency or rural guerrilla warfare, a particular form of military practice that can be harnessed to diverse political agendas. The factors that explain which countries have been at risk for civil war are not their ethnic or religious characteristics but rather the conditions that favor insurgency. These include poverty—which marks financially and bureaucratically weak states and also favors rebel recruitment—political instability, rough terrain, and large populations.We wish to thank the many people who provided comments on earlier versions of this paper in a series of seminar presentations. The authors also gratefully acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation (Grants SES-9876477 and SES-9876530); support from the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences with funds from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation; valuable research assistance from Ebru Erdem, Nikolay Marinov, Quinn Mecham, David Patel, and TQ Shang; sharing of data by Paul Collier.

5,994 citations

MonographDOI
01 May 2006

1,625 citations

Book
31 Dec 1990
TL;DR: In this article, the accomplished historian Jamil Hasanli has produced a comprehensive and meticulously documented account of this little-known period, drawing on contemporary records, memoirs, and scholarship in many languages.
Abstract: As revolution swept over Russia and empires collapsed in the final days of World War I, Azerbaijan and neighbouring Georgia and Armenia proclaimed their independence in May 1918. During the ensuing two years of civil war, military endgames, and treaty negotiations, the diplomatic representatives of Azerbaijan struggled to gain international recognition and favourable resolution of territorial disputes. This brief but eventful episode came to an end when the Red Army entered Baku in late April 1920. Drawing on contemporary records, memoirs, and scholarship in many languages, the accomplished historian Jamil Hasanli has produced a comprehensive and meticulously documented account of this little-known period

1,007 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article analyzed the effect of ethnic division on civil war and the role of political systems in preventing these conflicts, using the importance of religious polarization and animist diversity to explain the incidence of ethnic civil war.
Abstract: The effect of ethnic division on civil war and the role of political systems in preventing these conflicts are analyzed, using the importance of religious polarization and animist diversity to explain the incidence of ethnic civil war. Findings show that religious differences are a social cleavage more important than linguistic differences in the development of civil war, and being a consociational democracy significantly reduces the incidence of ethnic civil war.

931 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
24 Aug 2008
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present an empirical analysis of what makes countries prone to civil war using a global panel data set and examine different determinants of civil war for the period 1960-2004.
Abstract: Civil war is the most prevalent form of large-scale violence and is massively destructive to life, society, and the economy. The prevention of civil war is therefore a key priority for international attention. We present an empirical analysis of what makes countries prone to civil war. Using a global panel data set we examine different determinants of civil war for the period 1960-2004. We find little evidence that motivation can account for civil war risk but we suggest that there is evidence to support our feasibility hypothesis: that where a rebellion is financially and militarily feasible it will occur.JEL classifications: O10, D74.

840 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20231,016
20222,234
2021252
2020363
2019415
2018468