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Spanning tree

About: Spanning tree is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 9682 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 216421 citation(s).

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Book
01 Sep 1991-
TL;DR: This chapter discusses sorting on a Linear Array with a Systolic and Semisystolic Model of Computation, which automates the very labor-intensive and therefore time-heavy and expensive process of manually sorting arrays.

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Abstract: Preface Acknowledgments Notation 1 Arrays and Trees 1.1 Elementary Sorting and Counting 1.1.1 Sorting on a Linear Array Assessing the Performance of the Algorithm Sorting N Numbers with Fewer Than N Processors 1.1.2 Sorting in the Bit Model 1.1.3 Lower Bounds 1.1.4 A Counterexample-Counting 1.1.5 Properties of the Fixed-Connection Network Model 1.2 Integer Arithmetic 1.2.1 Carry-Lookahead Addition 1.2.2 Prefix Computations-Segmented Prefix Computations 1.2.3 Carry-Save Addition 1.2.4 Multiplication and Convolution 1.2.5 Division and Newton Iteration 1.3 Matrix Algorithms 1.3.1 Elementary Matrix Products 1.3.2 Algorithms for Triangular Matrices 1.3.3 Algorithms for Tridiagonal Matrices -Odd-Even Reduction -Parallel Prefix Algorithms 1.3.4 Gaussian Elimination 1.3.5 Iterative Methods -Jacobi Relaxation -Gauss-Seidel Relaxation Finite Difference Methods -Multigrid Methods 1.4 Retiming and Systolic Conversion 1.4.1 A Motivating Example-Palindrome Recognition 1.4.2 The Systolic and Semisystolic Model of Computation 1.4.3 Retiming Semisystolic Networks 1.4.4 Conversion of a Semisystolic Network into a Systolic Network 1.4.5 The Special Case of Broadcasting 1.4.6 Retiming the Host 1.4.7 Design by Systolic Conversion-A Summary 1.5 Graph Algorithms 1.5.1 Transitive Closure 1.5.2 Connected Components 1.5.3 Shortest Paths 1.5.4 Breadth-First Spanning Trees 1.5.5 Minimum Weight Spanning Trees 1.6 Sorting Revisited 1.6.1 Odd-Even Transposition Sort on a Linear Array 1.6.2 A Simple Root-N(log N + 1)-Step Sorting Algorithm 1.6.3 A (3 Root- N + o(Root-N))-Step Sorting Algorithm 1.6.4 A Matching Lower Bound 1.7 Packet Routing 1.7.1 Greedy Algorithms 1.7.2 Average-Case Analysis of Greedy Algorithms -Routing N Packets to Random Destinations -Analysis of Dynamic Routing Problems 1.7.3 Randomized Routing Algorithms 1.7.4 Deterministic Algorithms with Small Queues 1.7.5 An Off-line Algorithm 1.7.6 Other Routing Models and Algorithms 1.8 Image Analysis and Computational Geometry 1.8.1 Component-Labelling Algorithms -Levialdi's Algorithm -An O (Root-N)-Step Recursive Algorithm 1.8.2 Computing Hough Transforms 1.8.3 Nearest-Neighbor Algorithms 1.8.4 Finding Convex Hulls 1.9 Higher-Dimensional Arrays 1.9.1 Definitions and Properties 1.9.2 Matrix Multiplication 1.9.3 Sorting 1.9.4 Packet Routing 1.9.5 Simulating High-Dimensional Arrays on Low-Dimensional Arrays 1.10 problems 1.11 Bibliographic Notes 2 Meshes of Trees 2.1 The Two-Dimensional Mesh of Trees 2.1.1 Definition and Properties 2.1.2 Recursive Decomposition 2.1.3 Derivation from KN,N 2.1.4 Variations 2.1.5 Comparison With the Pyramid and Multigrid 2.2 Elementary O(log N)-Step Algorithms 2.2.1 Routing 2.2.2 Sorting 2.2.3 Matrix-Vector Multiplication 2.2.4 Jacobi Relaxation 2.2.5 Pivoting 2.2.6 Convolution 2.2.7 Convex Hull 2.3 Integer Arithmetic 2.3.1 Multiplication 2.3.2 Division and Chinese Remaindering 2.3.3 Related Problems -Iterated Products -Rooting Finding 2.4 Matrix Algorithms 2.4.1 The Three-Dimensional Mesh of Trees 2.4.2 Matrix Multiplication 2.4.3 Inverting Lower Triangular Matrices 2.4.4 Inverting Arbitrary Matrices -Csanky's Algorithm -Inversion by Newton Iteration 2.4.5 Related Problems 2.5 Graph Algorithms 2.5.1 Minimum-Weight Spanning Trees 2.5.2 Connected Components 2.5.3 Transitive Closure 2.5.4 Shortest Paths 2.5.5 Matching Problems 2.6 Fast Evaluation of Straight-Line Code 2.6.1 Addition and Multiplication Over a Semiring 2.6.2 Extension to Codes with Subtraction and Division 2.6.3 Applications 2.7 Higher-Dimensional meshes of Trees 2.7.1 Definitions and Properties 2.7.2 The Shuffle-Tree Graph 2.8 Problems 2.9 Bibliographic Notes 3 Hypercubes and Related Networks 3.1 The Hypercube 3.1.1 Definitions and Properties 3.1.2 Containment of Arrays -Higher-Dimensional Arrays -Non-Power-of-2 Arrays 3.1.3 Containment of Complete Binary Trees 3.1.4 Embeddings of Arbitrary Binary Trees -Embeddings with Dilation 1 and Load O(M over N + log N) -Embeddings with Dilation O(1) and Load O (M over N + 1) -A Review of One-Error-Correcting Codes -Embedding Plog N into Hlog N 3.1.5 Containment of Meshes of Trees 3.1.6 Other Containment Results 3.2 The Butterfly, Cube-Connected-Cycles , and Benes Network 3.2.1 Definitions and Properties 3.2.2 Simulation of Arbitrary Networks 3.2.3 Simulation of Normal Hypercube Algorithms 3.2.4 Some Containment and Simulation Results 3.3 The Shuffle-Exchange and de Bruijn Graphs 3.3.1 Definitions and Properties 3.3.2 The Diaconis Card Tricks 3.3.3 Simulation of Normal Hypercube Algorithms 3.3.4 Similarities with the Butterfly 3.3.5 Some Containment and Simulation Results 3.4 Packet-Routing Algorithms 3.4.1 Definitions and Routing Models 3.4.2 Greedy Routing Algorithms and Worst-Case Problems 3.4.3 Packing, Spreading, and Monotone Routing Problems -Reducing a Many-to-Many Routing Problem to a Many-to-One Routing Problem -Reducing a Routing Problem to a Sorting Problem 3.4.4 The Average-Case Behavior of the Greedy Algorithm -Bounds on Congestion -Bounds on Running Time -Analyzing Non-Predictive Contention-Resolution Protocols 3.4.5 Converting Worst-Case Routing Problems into Average-Case Routing Problems -Hashing -Randomized Routing 3.4.6 Bounding Queue Sizes -Routing on Arbitrary Levelled Networks 3.4.7 Routing with Combining 3.4.8 The Information Dispersal Approach to Routing -Using Information Dispersal to Attain Fault-Tolerance -Finite Fields and Coding Theory 3.4.9 Circuit-Switching Algorithms 3.5 Sorting 3.5.1 Odd-Even Merge Sort -Constructing a Sorting Circuit with Depth log N(log N +1)/2 3.5.2 Sorting Small Sets 3.5.3 A Deterministic O(log N log log N)-Step Sorting Algorithm 3.5.4 Randomized O(log N)-Step Sorting Algorithms -A Circuit with Depth 7.45 log N that Usually Sorts 3.6 Simulating a Parallel Random Access Machine 3.6.1 PRAM Models and Shared Memories 3.6.2 Randomized Simulations Based on Hashing 3.6.3 Deterministic Simulations using Replicated Data 3.6.4 Using Information Dispersal to Improve Performance 3.7 The Fast Fourier Transform 3.7.1 The Algorithm 3.7.2 Implementation on the Butterfly and Shuffle-Exchange Graph 3.7.3 Application to Convolution and Polynomial Arithmetic 3.7.4 Application to Integer Multiplication 3.8 Other Hypercubic Networks 3.8.1 Butterflylike Networks -The Omega Network -The Flip Network -The Baseline and Reverse Baseline Networks -Banyan and Delta Networks -k-ary Butterflies 3.8.2 De Bruijn-Type Networks -The k-ary de Bruijn Graph -The Generalized Shuffle-Exchange Graph 3.9 Problems 3.10 Bibliographic Notes Bibliography Index Lemmas, Theorems, and Corollaries Author Index Subject Index

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2,870 citations


Book
Robert E. Tarjan1Institutions (1)
01 Jan 1983-
TL;DR: This paper presents a meta-trees tree model that automates the very labor-intensive and therefore time-heavy and therefore expensive process of manually selecting trees to grow in a graph.

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Abstract: Foundations Disjoint Sets Heaps Search Trees Linking and Cutting Trees Minimum Spanning Trees Shortest Paths Network Flows Matchings

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2,077 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Michael Held1, Richard M. Karp2Institutions (2)
TL;DR: It is shown that maxπwπ = C* precisely when a certain well-known linear program has an optimal solution in integers.

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Abstract: This paper explores new approaches to the symmetric traveling-salesman problem in which 1-trees, which are a slight variant of spanning trees, play an essential role. A 1-tree is a tree together with an additional vertex connected to the tree by two edges. We observe that i a tour is precisely a 1-tree in which each vertex has degree 2, ii a minimum 1-tree is easy to compute, and iii the transformation on "intercity distances" cij → Cij + πi + πj leaves the traveling-salesman problem invariant but changes the minimum 1-tree. Using these observations, we define an infinite family of lower bounds wπ on C*, the cost of an optimum tour. We show that maxπwπ = C* precisely when a certain well-known linear program has an optimal solution in integers. We give a column-generation method and an ascent method for computing maxπwπ, and construct a branch-and-bound method in which the lower bounds wπ control the search for an optimum tour.

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1,393 citations


01 Feb 1976-
TL;DR: An O(n3) heuristic algorithm is described for solving d-city travelling salesman problems (TSP) whose cost matrix satisfies the triangularity condition and a worst-case analysis of this heuristic shows that the ratio of the answer obtained to the optimum TSP solution is strictly less than 3/2.

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Abstract: : An O(n sup 3) heuristic algorithm is described for solving n-city travelling salesman problems (TSP) whose cost matrix satisfies the triangularity condition. The algorithm involves as substeps the computation of a shortest spanning tree of the graph G defining the TSP, and the finding of a minimum cost perfect matching of a certain induced subgraph of G. A worst-case analysis of this heuristic shows that the ratio of the answer obtained to the optimum TSP solution is strictly less than 3/2. This represents a 50% reduction over the value 2 which was the previously best known such ratio for the performance of other polynomial-growth algorithms for the TSP.

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1,263 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Wei Ren1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: This note shows that consensus is reached asymptotically for the first two cases if the undirected interaction graph is connected and for the third case if the directed interaction graph has a directed spanning tree and the gain for velocity matching with the group reference velocity is above a certain bound.

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Abstract: This note considers consensus algorithms for double-integrator dynamics. We propose and analyze consensus algorithms for double-integrator dynamics in four cases: 1) with a bounded control input, 2) without relative velocity measurements, 3) with a group reference velocity available to each team member, and 4) with a bounded control input when a group reference state is available to only a subset of the team. We show that consensus is reached asymptotically for the first two cases if the undirected interaction graph is connected. We further show that consensus is reached asymptotically for the third case if the directed interaction graph has a directed spanning tree and the gain for velocity matching with the group reference velocity is above a certain bound. We also show that consensus is reached asymptotically for the fourth case if and only if the group reference state flows directly or indirectly to all of the vehicles in the team.

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1,247 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202212
2021349
2020393
2019392
2018411
2017393

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Topic's top 5 most impactful authors

David Eppstein

36 papers, 1.2K citations

David Peleg

33 papers, 1.9K citations

Zhongzhi Zhang

17 papers, 400 citations

Guido Proietti

17 papers, 118 citations

Gopal Pandurangan

17 papers, 348 citations