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Speech disorder

About: Speech disorder is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 981 publications have been published within this topic receiving 20301 citations. The topic is also known as: speech impediment & speech impediment or impairment.


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Book
15 Jan 1995
TL;DR: In this article, the authors define, understand, and categorize motor speech disorders, and present a classification of the disorders based on the following: 1. Defining, Understanding, and Categorizing Motor Speech Disorders 2. Neurologic Bases of Motor Speech and its Pathologies 3. Examination of motor Speech disorders Part 2: The Disorders and their Diagnoses 4.
Abstract: Part 1: Substrates 1. Defining, Understanding, and Categorizing Motor Speech Disorders 2. Neurologic Bases of Motor Speech and its Pathologies 3. Examination of Motor Speech Disorders Part 2: The Disorders and Their Diagnoses 4. Flaccid Dysarthria 5. Spastic Dysarthria 6. Ataxic Dysarthria 7. Hypokinetic Dysarthria 8. Hyperkinetic Dysarthria 9. Unilateral Upper Motor Neuron Dysarthria 10. Mixed Dysarthrias 11. Apraxia of Speech 12. Neurogenic Mutism 13. Other Neurogenic Speech Disturbances 14. Acquired Psychogenic Speech Disturbances 15. Differential Diagnosis Part 3: Management 16. Managing Motor Speech Disorders: General Principles 17. Managing the Dysarthrias 18. Managing Apraxia of Speech 19. Managing Other Neurogenic Speech Disturbances 20. Managing Acquired Psychogenic Speech Disorders

1,215 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A survey of approximately 460 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) or multiple sclerosis (MS) shows that speech and swallowing difficulties are very frequent within these groups.
Abstract: A survey of approximately 460 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) or multiple sclerosis (MS) shows that speech and swallowing difficulties are very frequent within these groups. Seventy percent of the PD patients and 44% of the MS patients had experienced impairment of speech and voice after the onset of their disease. Forty-one percent of the PD patients and 33% of the MS patients indicated impairment of chewing and swallowing abilities. The speech disorder was regarded as one of their greatest problems by 29% of the PD patients and by 16% of the MS patients. Only a small number of patients, 3% of the PD and 2% of the MS group, had received any speech therapy.

404 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It was found that measurement of the fundamental frequency variations applied to two selected tasks was the best method for separating healthy from PD subjects and it has been demonstrated that 78% of early untreated PD subjects indicate some form of vocal impairment.
Abstract: An assessment of vocal impairment is presented for separating healthy people from persons with early untreated Parkinson’s disease (PD). This study’s main purpose was to (a) determine whether voice and speech disorder are present from early stages of PD before starting dopaminergic pharmacotherapy, (b) ascertain the specific characteristics of the PD-related vocal impairment, (c) identify PD-related acoustic signatures for the major part of traditional clinically used measurement methods with respect to their automatic assessment, and (d) design new automatic measurement methods of articulation. The varied speech data were collected from 46 Czech native speakers, 23 with PD. Subsequently, 19 representative measurements were pre-selected, and Wald sequential analysis was then applied to assess the efficiency of each measure and the extent of vocal impairment of each subject. It was found that measurement of the fundamental frequency variations applied to two selected tasks was the best method for separating healthy from PD subjects. On the basis of objective acoustic measures, statistical decision-making theory, and validation from practicing speech therapists, it has been demonstrated that 78% of early untreated PD subjects indicate some form of vocal impairment. The speech defects thus uncovered differ individually in various characteristics including phonation, articulation, and prosody.

345 citations

Book
01 Jan 1995
TL;DR: Understanding the relationship between speech and language impairment and literacy difficulties: the central role of phonology is explained.
Abstract: Preface. General Preface. Contributors. Acknowledgements. PART I: UNDERSTANDING SPEECH-DISORDERED CHILDREN. Chapter 1. Children with speech disorder: defining the problem. Chapter 2. Children's quisition of phonology. Chapter 3. Differential diagnosis of phonological disorders. Chapter 4. Childhood apraxia of speech. Chapter 5. Epidemiology of speech disorders. Chapter 6. The relationship between specch disorder and language. PART II: TREATMENT OF PHONOLOGICAL DISORDER. Chapter 7. A problem-solving approach to clinical management. Chapter 8. A procedure for classification of speech disoder. Chapter 9. Phonological approaches to intervention. Chapter 10. Treating inconsistent speech disorders. Chapter 11. Childhood apraxia of speech: treatment case studies. Chapter 12. Clinical differences. PART III: SPEECH DISORDERS IN SPECIAL POPULATIONS. Chapter 13. Phonological abilities of children with cognitive impairment. Chapter 14. Hearing impairment. Chapter 15. The relationship between auditory processing and phonological impairment. Chapter 16. Bilingual children with phonological disorders: identification and intervention. Chapter 17. Understanding the relationship between speech and language impairment and literacy difficulties: the central role of phonology. Appendices. References. Index.

300 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The amount of sentence complexity was found to be familial and to cosegregate with schizophrenia within families, thus suggesting that deficits in specifically human aspects of language may be related to the genetics of schizophrenia.
Abstract: The language capacity of modern humans is thought by some to be clearly distinct from that of nonhuman primates (Bickerton 1990). Crow (1997, 1998a) has proposed that a disturbance in the uniquely human aspects of language is central to the genetic etiology of schizophrenia. A review of the literature on language disorder in schizophrenia provides evidence for widespread deficits in comprehension, production, attention, and cerebral lateralization of language. We focused here on those anomalies that are uniquely human aspects of language. Bickerton's five distinctly human language devices were examined in patients with schizophrenia and their families by using a structured scoring format on oral soliloquies. The chronic patients showed reduced use of clausal embedding and used fewer words than first episode patients or well family members. The amount of sentence complexity was found to be familial and to cosegregate with schizophrenia within families. These data are consistent with previous literature and additionally show a familial component to these measures, thus suggesting that deficits in specifically human aspects of language may be related to the genetics of schizophrenia.

287 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202313
202228
202141
202060
201941
201844