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Stock (geology)

About: Stock (geology) is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 31009 publications have been published within this topic receiving 783542 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
Yakov Amihud1
TL;DR: In this article, the authors show that expected market illiquidity positively affects ex ante stock excess return, suggesting that expected stock ex ante excess return partly represents an illiquid price premium, which complements the cross-sectional positive return-illiquidity relationship.

5,636 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Yakov Amihud1
TL;DR: In this paper, the effects of stock illiquidity on stock return have been investigated and it was shown that expected market illiquidities positively affects ex ante stock excess return (usually called risk premium) over time.
Abstract: New tests are presented on the effects of stock illiquidity on stock return. Over time, expected market illiquidity positively affects ex ante stock excess return (usually called â¬Srisk premiumâ¬?). This complements the positive cross-sectional return-illiquidity relationship. The illiquidity measure here is the average daily ratio of absolute stock return to dollar volume, which is easily obtained from daily stock data for long time series in most stock markets. Illiquidity affects more strongly small firms stocks, suggesting an explanation for the changes â¬Ssmall firm effectâ¬? over time. The impact of market illiquidity on stock excess return suggests the existence of illiquidity premium and helps explain the equity premium puzzle.

5,333 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the relationship between aggregate productivity and stock and flow government-spending variables is investigated and the empirical results indicate that the non-military public capital stock is dramatically more important in determining productivity than is either the flow of nonmilitary or military spending, and that military capital bears little relation to productivity.

5,163 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine the process by which common stock prices adjust to the information (if any) that is implicit in a stock split and show that the independence of successive price changes is consistent with a market that adjusts rapidly to new information.
Abstract: There is an impressive body of empirical evidence which indicates that successive price changes in individual common stocks are very nearly independent. Recent papers by Mandelbrot and Samuelson show rigorously that independence of successive price changes is consistent with an "efficient" market, i.e., a market that adjusts rapidly to new information. It is important to note, however, that in the empirical work to date the usual procedure has been to infer market efficiency from the observed independence of successive price changes. There has been very little actual testing of the speed of adjustment of prices to specijc kinds of new information. The prime concern of this paper is to examine the process by which common stock prices adjust to the information (if any) that is implicit in a stock split

4,470 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigated whether marketwide liquidity is a state variable important for asset pricing and found that expected stock returns are related cross-sectionally to the sensitivities of returns to fluctuations in aggregate liquidity.
Abstract: This study investigates whether marketwide liquidity is a state variable important for asset pricing. We find that expected stock returns are related cross-sectionally to the sensitivities of returns to fluctuations in aggregate liquidity. Our monthly liquidity measure, an average of individual-stock measures estimated with daily data, relies on the principle that order flow induces greater return reversals when liquidity is lower. From 1966 through 1999, the average return on stocks with high sensitivities to liquidity exceeds that for stocks with low sensitivities by 7.5 percent annually, adjusted for exposures to the market return as well as size, value, and momentum factors. Furthermore, a liquidity risk factor accounts for half of the profits to a momentum strategy over the same 34-year period.

4,048 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202237
20211,825
20201,882
20191,697
20181,539
20171,706