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Strained silicon

About: Strained silicon is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 6076 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 138975 citation(s).


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Because monolayer MoS(2) has a direct bandgap, it can be used to construct interband tunnel FETs, which offer lower power consumption than classical transistors, and could also complement graphene in applications that require thin transparent semiconductors, such as optoelectronics and energy harvesting.
Abstract: Two-dimensional materials are attractive for use in next-generation nanoelectronic devices because, compared to one-dimensional materials, it is relatively easy to fabricate complex structures from them. The most widely studied two-dimensional material is graphene, both because of its rich physics and its high mobility. However, pristine graphene does not have a bandgap, a property that is essential for many applications, including transistors. Engineering a graphene bandgap increases fabrication complexity and either reduces mobilities to the level of strained silicon films or requires high voltages. Although single layers of MoS(2) have a large intrinsic bandgap of 1.8 eV (ref. 16), previously reported mobilities in the 0.5-3 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) range are too low for practical devices. Here, we use a halfnium oxide gate dielectric to demonstrate a room-temperature single-layer MoS(2) mobility of at least 200 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), similar to that of graphene nanoribbons, and demonstrate transistors with room-temperature current on/off ratios of 1 × 10(8) and ultralow standby power dissipation. Because monolayer MoS(2) has a direct bandgap, it can be used to construct interband tunnel FETs, which offer lower power consumption than classical transistors. Monolayer MoS(2) could also complement graphene in applications that require thin transparent semiconductors, such as optoelectronics and energy harvesting.

10,809 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Yi Cui1, Zhaohui Zhong1, Deli Wang1, Wayne U. Wang1, Charles M. Lieber1 
Abstract: Silicon nanowires can be prepared with single-crystal structures, diameters as small as several nanometers and controllable hole and electron doping, and thus represent powerful building blocks for nanoelectronics devices such as field effect transistors. To explore the potential limits of silicon nanowire transistors, we have examined the influence of source-drain contact thermal annealing and surface passivation on key transistor properties. Thermal annealing and passivation of oxide defects using chemical modification were found to increase the average transconductance from 45 to 800 nS and average mobility from 30 to 560 cm 2 /V‚s with peak values of 2000 nS and 1350 cm 2 /V‚s, respectively. The comparison of these results and other key parameters with state-of-the-art planar silicon devices shows substantial advantages for silicon nanowires. The uses of nanowires as building blocks for future nanoelectronics are discussed.

2,080 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Porous silicon layers grown on nondegenerated p‐type silicon electrodes in hydrofluoric acid electrolytes are translucent for visible light, which is equivalent to an increased band gap compared to bulk silicon. It will be shown that a two‐dimensional quantum confinement (quantum wire) in the very narrow walls between the pores not only explains the change in band‐gap energy but may also be the key to better understanding the dissolution mechanism that leads to porous silicon formation.

1,678 citations

Book
31 Mar 1991
Abstract: 1 Introduction.- 2 SOI Materials.- 2.1 Introduction.- 2.2 Heteroepitaxial techniques.- 2.2.1 Silicon-on-Sapphire (SOS).- 2.2.2 Other heteroepitaxial SOI materials.- 2.2.2.1 Silicon-on-Zirconia (SOZ).- 2.2.2.2 Silicon-on-Spinel.- 2.2.2.3 Silicon on Calcium Fluoride.- 2.3 Dielectric Isolation (DI).- 2.4 Polysilicon melting and recrystallization.- 2.4.1 Laser recrystallization.- 2.4.2 E-beam recrystallization.- 2.4.3 Zone-melting recrystallization.- 2.5 Homoepitaxial techniques.- 2.5.1 Epitaxial lateral overgrowth.- 2.5.2 Lateral solid-phase epitaxy.- 2.6 FIPOS.- 2.7 Ion beam synthesis of a buried insulator.- 2.7.1 Separation by implanted oxygen (SIMOX).- 2.7.1.1 "Standard"SIMOX.- 2.7.1.2 Low-dose SIMOX.- 2.7.1.3 ITOX.- 2.7.1.4 SMOXMLD.- 2.7.1.5 Related techniques.- 2.7.1.6 Material quality.- 2.7.2 Separation by implanted nitrogen (SIMNI).- 2.7.3 Separation by implanted oxygen and nitrogen (SIMON).- 2.7.4 Separation by implanted Carbon.- 2.8 Wafer Bonding and Etch Back (BESOI).- 2.8.1 Hydrophilic wafer bonding.- 2.8.2 Etch back.- 2.9 Layer transfer techniques.- 2.9.1 Smart-Cut(R).- 2.9.1.1 Hydrogen / rare gas implantation.- 2.9.1.2 Bonding to a stiffener.- 2.9.1.3 Annealing.- 2.9.1.4 Splitting.- 2.9.1.5 Further developments.- 2.9.2 Eltran(R).- 2.9.2.1 Porous silicon formation.- 2.9.2.2 The original Eltran(R) process.- 2.9.2.3 Second-generation Eltran(R) process.- 2.9.3 Transferred layer material quality.- 2.10 Strained silicon on insulator (SSOI).- 2.11 Silicon on diamond.- 2.12 Silicon-on-nothing (SON).- 3 SOI Materials Characterization.- 3.1 Introduction.- 3.2 Film thickness measurement.- 3.2.1 Spectroscopic reflectometry.- 3.2.2 Spectroscopic ellipsometry.- 3.2.3 Electrical thickness measurement.- 3.3 Crystal quality.- 3.3.1 Crystal orientation.- 3.3.2 Degree of crystallinity.- 3.3.3 Defects in the silicon film.- 3.3.3.1 Most common defects.- 3.3.3.2 Chemical decoration of defects.- 3.3.3.3 Detection of defects by light scattering.- 3.3.3.4 Other defect assessment techniques.- 3.3.3.5 Stress in the silicon film.- 3.3.4 Defects in the buried oxide.- 3.3.5 Bond quality and bonding energy.- 3.4 Carrier lifetime.- 3.4.1 Surface Photovoltage.- 3.4.2 Photoluminescence.- 3.4.3 Measurements on MOS transistors.- 3.4.3.1 Accumulation-mode transistor.- 3.4.3.2 Inversion-mode transistor.- 3.4.3.3 Bipolar effect.- 3.5 Silicon/Insulator interfaces.- 3.5.1 Capacitance measurements.- 3.5.2 Charge pumping.- 3.5.3 ?-MOSFET.- 4 SOI CMOS Technology.- 4.1 SOI CMOS processing.- 4.1.1 Fabrication yield and fabrication cost.- 4.2 Field isolation.- 4.2.1 LOCOS.- 4.2.2 Mesa isolation.- 4.2.3 Shallow trench isolation.- 4.2.4 Narrow-channel effects.- 4.3 Channel doping profile.- 4.4 Source and drain engineering.- 4.4.1 Silicide source and drain.- 4.4.2 Elevated source and drain.- 4.4.3 Tungsten clad.- 4.4.4 Schottky source and drain.- 4.5 Gate stack.- 4.5.1 Gate material.- 4.5.2 Gate dielectric.- 4.5.3 Gate etch.- 4.6 SOI MOSFET layout.- 4.6.1 Body contact.- 4.7 SOI-bulk CMOS design comparison.- 4.8 ESD protection.- 5 The SOI MOSFET.- 5.1 Capacitances.- 5.1.1 Source and drain capacitance.- 5.1.2 Gate capacitance.- 5.2 Fully and partially depleted devices.- 5.3 Threshold voltage.- 5.3.1 Body effect.- 5.3.2 Short-channel effects.- 5.4 Current-voltage characteristics.- 5.4.1 Lim & Fossum model.- 5.4.2 C?-continuous model.- 5.5 Transconductance.- 5.5.1 gm/ID ratio.- 5.5.2 Mobility.- 5.6 Basic parameter extraction.- 5.6.1 Threshold voltage and mobility.- 5.6.2 Source and drain resistance.- 5.7 Subthreshold slope.- 5.8 Ultra-thin SOI MOSFETs.- 5.8.1 Threshold voltage.- 5.8.2 Mobility.- 5.9 Impact ionization and high-field effects.- 5.9.1 Kink effect.- 5.9.2 Hot-carrier degradation.- 5.10 Floating-body and parasitic BJT effects.- 5.10.1 Anomalous subthreshold slope.- 5.10.2 Reduced drain breakdown voltage.- 5.10.3 Other floating-body effects.- 5.11 Self heating.- 5.12 Accumulation-mode MOSFET.- 5.12.1 I-V characteristics.- 5.12.2 Subthreshold slope.- 5.13 Unified body-effect representation.- 5.14 RF MOSFETs.- 5.15 CAD models for SOI MOSFETs.- 6 Other SOI Devices.- 6.1 Multiple-gate SOI MOSFETs.- 6.1.1 Multiple-gate SOI MOSFET structures.- 6.1.1.1 Double-gate SOI MOSFETs.- 6.1.1.2 Triple-gate SOI MOSFETs.- 6.1.1.3 Surrounding-gate SOI MOSFETs.- 6.1.1.4 Triple-plus gate SOI MOSFETs..- 6.1.2 Device characteristics.- 6.1.2.1 Current drive.- 6.1.2.2 Short-channel effects.- 6.1.2.3 Threshold voltage.- 6.1.2.4 Volume inversion.- 6.1.2.5 Mobility.- 6.2 MTCMOS/DTMOS.- 6.3 High-voltage devices.- 6.3.1 VDMOS and LDMOS.- 6.3.2 Other high-voltage devices.- 6.4 Junction Field-Effect Transistor.- 6.5 Lubistor.- 6.6 Bipolar junction transistors.- 6.7 Photodiodes.- 6.8 G4 FET.- 6.9 Quantum-effect devices.- 7 The SOI MOSFET in a Harsh Environment.- 7.1 Ionizing radiations.- 7.1.1 Single-event phenomena.- 7.1.2 Total dose effects.- 7.1.3 Dose-rate effects.- 7.2 High-temperature operation.- 7.2.1 Leakage current.- 7.2.2 Threshold voltage.- 7.2.3 Output conductance.- 7.2.4 Subthreshold slope.- 8 SOI Circuits.- 8.1 Introduction.- 8.2 Mainstream CMOS applications.- 8.2.1 Digital circuits.- 8.2.2 Low-voltage, low-power digital circuits.- 8.2.3 Memory circuits.- 8.2.3.1 Non volatile memory devices.- 8.2.3.2 Capacitorless DRAM.- 8.2.4 Analog circuits.- 8.2.5 Mixed-mode circuits.- 8.3 Niche applications.- 8.3.1 High-temperature circuits.- 8.3.2 Radiation-hardened circuits.- 8.3.3 Smart-power circuits.- 8.4 Three-dimensional integration.

1,581 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
24 Jun 1999-Nature
Abstract: The narrowest feature on present-day integrated circuits is the gate oxide—the thin dielectric layer that forms the basis of field-effect device structures. Silicon dioxide is the dielectric of choice and, if present miniaturization trends continue, the projected oxide thickness by 2012 will be less than one nanometre, or about five silicon atoms across1. At least two of those five atoms will be at the silicon–oxide interfaces, and so will have very different electrical and optical properties from the desired bulk oxide, while constituting a significant fraction of the dielectric layer. Here we use electron-energy-loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope to measure the chemical composition and electronic structure, at the atomic scale, across gate oxides as thin as one nanometre. We are able to resolve the interfacial states that result from the spillover of the silicon conduction-band wavefunctions into the oxide. The spatial extent of these states places a fundamental limit of 0.7 nm (four silicon atoms across) on the thinnest usable silicon dioxide gate dielectric. And for present-day oxide growth techniques, interface roughness will raise this limit to 1.2 nm.

985 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202121
202022
201928
201829
201787
2016127