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String searching algorithm

About: String searching algorithm is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 4386 publications have been published within this topic receiving 113253 citations.


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Book
01 Jan 1997
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors introduce suffix trees and their use in sequence alignment, core string edits, alignments and dynamic programming, and extend the core problems to extend the main problems.
Abstract: Part I. Exact String Matching: The Fundamental String Problem: 1. Exact matching: fundamental preprocessing and first algorithms 2. Exact matching: classical comparison-based methods 3. Exact matching: a deeper look at classical methods 4. Semi-numerical string matching Part II. Suffix Trees and their Uses: 5. Introduction to suffix trees 6. Linear time construction of suffix trees 7. First applications of suffix trees 8. Constant time lowest common ancestor retrieval 9. More applications of suffix trees Part III. Inexact Matching, Sequence Alignment and Dynamic Programming: 10. The importance of (sub)sequence comparison in molecular biology 11. Core string edits, alignments and dynamic programming 12. Refining core string edits and alignments 13. Extending the core problems 14. Multiple string comparison: the Holy Grail 15. Sequence database and their uses: the motherlode Part IV. Currents, Cousins and Cameos: 16. Maps, mapping, sequencing and superstrings 17. Strings and evolutionary trees 18. Three short topics 19. Models of genome-level mutations.

3,904 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A simple, efficient algorithm to locate all occurrences of any of a finite number of keywords in a string of text that has been used to improve the speed of a library bibliographic search program by a factor of 5 to 10.
Abstract: This paper describes a simple, efficient algorithm to locate all occurrences of any of a finite number of keywords in a string of text. The algorithm consists of constructing a finite state pattern matching machine from the keywords and then using the pattern matching machine to process the text string in a single pass. Construction of the pattern matching machine takes time proportional to the sum of the lengths of the keywords. The number of state transitions made by the pattern matching machine in processing the text string is independent of the number of keywords. The algorithm has been used to improve the speed of a library bibliographic search program by a factor of 5 to 10.

3,270 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An algorithm is presented which solves the string-to-string correction problem in time proportional to the product of the lengths of the two strings.
Abstract: The string-to-string correction problem is to determine the distance between two strings as measured by the minimum cost sequence of “edit operations” needed to change the one string into the other. The edit operations investigated allow changing one symbol of a string into another single symbol, deleting one symbol from a string, or inserting a single symbol into a string. An algorithm is presented which solves this problem in time proportional to the product of the lengths of the two strings. Possible applications are to the problems of automatic spelling correction and determining the longest subsequence of characters common to two strings.

3,252 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An algorithm is presented which finds all occurrences of one given string within another, in running time proportional to the sum of the lengths of the strings, showing that the set of concatenations of even palindromes, i.e., the language $\{\alpha \alpha ^R\}^*$, can be recognized in linear time.
Abstract: An algorithm is presented which finds all occurrences of one given string within another, in running time proportional to the sum of the lengths of the strings. The constant of proportionality is low enough to make this algorithm of practical use, and the procedure can also be extended to deal with some more general pattern-matching problems. A theoretical application of the algorithm shows that the set of concatenations of even palindromes, i.e., the language $\{\alpha \alpha ^R\}^*$, can be recognized in linear time. Other algorithms which run even faster on the average are also considered.

3,156 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work surveys the current techniques to cope with the problem of string matching that allows errors, and focuses on online searching and mostly on edit distance, explaining the problem and its relevance, its statistical behavior, its history and current developments, and the central ideas of the algorithms.
Abstract: We survey the current techniques to cope with the problem of string matching that allows errors. This is becoming a more and more relevant issue for many fast growing areas such as information retrieval and computational biology. We focus on online searching and mostly on edit distance, explaining the problem and its relevance, its statistical behavior, its history and current developments, and the central ideas of the algorithms and their complexities. We present a number of experiments to compare the performance of the different algorithms and show which are the best choices. We conclude with some directions for future work and open problems.

2,723 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202328
202269
202154
202098
2019116
2018131