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Structural health monitoring

About: Structural health monitoring is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 11727 publications have been published within this topic receiving 186231 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Technical challenges that must be addressed if SHM is to gain wider application are discussed in a general manner and the historical overview and summarizing the SPR paradigm are provided.
Abstract: This introduction begins with a brief history of SHM technology development. Recent research has begun to recognise that a productive approach to the Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) problem is to regard it as one of statistical pattern recognition (SPR); a paradigm addressing the problem in such a way is described in detail herein as it forms the basis for the organisation of this book. In the process of providing the historical overview and summarising the SPR paradigm, the subsequent chapters in this book are cited in an effort to show how they fit into this overview of SHM. In the conclusions are stated a number of technical challenges that the authors believe must be addressed if SHM is to gain wider acceptance.

2,152 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper is intended to serve as a summary review of the collective experience the structural engineering community has gained from the use of wireless sensors and sensor networks for monitoring structural performance and health.
Abstract: In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the adoption of emerging sensing technologies for instrumentation within a variety of structural systems. Wireless sensors and sensor networks are emerging as sensing paradigms that the structural engineering field has begun to consider as substitutes for traditional tethered monitoring systems. A benefit of wireless structural monitoring systems is that they are inexpensive to install because extensive wiring is no longer required between sensors and the data acquisition system. Researchers are discovering that wireless sensors are an exciting technology that should not be viewed as simply a substitute for traditional tethered monitoring systems. Rather, wireless sensors can play greater roles in the processing of structural response data; this feature can be utilized to screen data for signs of structural damage. Also, wireless sensors have limitations that require novel system architectures and modes of operation. This paper is intended to serve as a summary review of the collective experience the structural engineering community has gained from the use of wireless sensors and sensor networks for monitoring structural performance and health.

1,497 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
03 Nov 2004
TL;DR: Wisden incorporates two novel mechanisms, reliable data transport using a hybrid of end-to-end and hop-by-hop recovery, and low-overhead data time-stamping that does not require global clock synchronization.
Abstract: Structural monitoring---the collection and analysis of structural response to ambient or forced excitation--is an important application of networked embedded sensing with significant commercial potential. The first generation of sensor networks for structural monitoring are likely to be data acquisition systems that collect data at a single node for centralized processing. In this paper, we discuss the design and evaluation of a wireless sensor network system (called Wisden for structural data acquisition. Wisden incorporates two novel mechanisms, reliable data transport using a hybrid of end-to-end and hop-by-hop recovery, and low-overhead data time-stamping that does not require global clock synchronization. We also study the applicability of wavelet-based compression techniques to overcome the bandwidth limitations imposed by low-power wireless radios. We describe our implementation of these mechanisms on the Mica-2 motes and evaluate the performance of our implementation. We also report experiences from deploying Wisden on a large structure.

1,195 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, Niezrecki et al. summarized the hardware and software issues of impedance-based structural health modi- toring based on piezoelectric materials.
Abstract: In this paper we summarize the hardware and software issues of impedance-based structural health moni- toring based on piezoelectric materials. The basic concept of the method is to use high-frequency structural excitations to monitor the local area of a structure for changes in structural impedance that would indicate imminent damage. A brief overview of research work on experimental and theoretical stud- ies on various structures is considered and several research papers on these topics are cited. This paper concludes with a discussion of future research areas and path forward. Piezoelectric materials acting in the "direct" manner pro- duce an electrical charge when stressed mechanically. Con- versely, a mechanical strain is produced when an electrical field is applied. The direct piezoelectric effect has often been used in sensors such as piezoelectric accelerometers. With the converse effect, piezoelectric materials apply local- ized strains and directly influence the dynamic response of the structural elements when either embedded or surface bonded into a structure. Piezoelectric materials have been widely used in structural dynamics applications because they are lightweight, robust, inexpensive, and come in a variety of forms ranging from thin rectangular patches to complex shapes being used in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) fabrications. The applications of piezoelectric mate- rials in structural dynamics are too numerous to mention and are detailed in the literature (Niezrecki et al., 2001; Chopra, 2002). The purpose of this paper is to explore the importance and effectiveness of impedance-based structural health mon- itoring from both hardware and software standpoints. Imped- ance-based structural health monitoring techniques have been developed as a promising tool for real-time structural dam- age assessment, and are considered as a new non-destructive evaluation (NDE) method. A key aspect of impedance-based structural health monitoring is the use of piezoceramic (PZT) materials as collocated sensors and actuators. The basis of this active sensing technology is the energy transfer between the actuator and its host mechanical system. It has been shown that the electrical impedance of the PZT material can be directly related to the mechanical impedance of a host structural component where the PZT patch is attached. Uti- lizing the same material for both actuation and sensing not only reduces the number of sensors and actuators, but also reduces the electrical wiring and associated hardware. Fur- thermore, the size and weight of the PZT patch are negligible compared to those of the host structures so that its attach- ment to the structure introduces no impact on dynamic char- acteristics of the structure. A typical deployment of a PZT on a structure being monitored is shown in Figure 1. The first part of this paper (Sections 2 and 3) deals with the theoretical background and design considerations of the impedance-based structural health monitoring. The signal processing of the impedance method is outlined in Section 4. In Section 5, experimental studies using the impedance approaches are summarized and related previous works are listed. Section 6 presents a brief comparison of the imped- ance method with other NDE approaches and, finally, sev- eral future issues are outlined in Section 7. 2. Theoretical Background

1,048 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
25 Apr 2007
TL;DR: A Wireless Sensor Network for Structural Health Monitoring is designed, implemented, deployed and tested on the 4200 ft long main span and the south tower of the Golden Gate Bridge and the collected data agrees with theoretical models and previous studies of the bridge.
Abstract: A Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is designed, implemented, deployed and tested on the 4200 ft long main span and the south tower of the Golden Gate Bridge (GGB). Ambient structural vibrations are reliably measured at a low cost and without interfering with the operation of the bridge. Requirements that SHM imposes on WSN are identified and new solutions to meet these requirements are proposed and implemented. In the GGB deployment, 64 nodes are distributed over the main span and the tower, collecting ambient vibrations synchronously at 1 kHz rate, with less than 10 mus jitter, and with an accuracy of 30 muG. The sampled data is collected reliably over a 46-hop network, with a bandwidth of 441 B/s at the 46th hop. The collected data agrees with theoretical models and previous studies of the bridge. The deployment is the largest WSN for SHM.

992 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2023600
20221,374
2021776
2020746
2019803
2018708