scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Topic

Subduction

About: Subduction is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 22452 publications have been published within this topic receiving 1156009 citations.


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
23 Nov 2001-Science
TL;DR: Two end member models of how the high elevations in Tibet formed are (i) continuous thickening and widespread viscous flow of the crust and mantle of the entire plateau and (ii) time-dependent, localized shear between coherent lithospheric blocks.
Abstract: Two end member models of how the high elevations in Tibet formed are (i) continuous thickening and widespread viscous flow of the crust and mantle of the entire plateau and (ii) time-dependent, localized shear between coherent lithospheric blocks. Recent studies of Cenozoic deformation, magmatism, and seismic structure lend support to the latter. Since India collided with Asia ∼55 million years ago, the rise of the high Tibetan plateau likely occurred in three main steps, by successive growth and uplift of 300- to 500-kilometer-wide crustal thrust-wedges. The crust thickened, while the mantle, decoupled beneath gently dipping shear zones, did not. Sediment infilling, bathtub-like, of dammed intermontane basins formed flat high plains at each step. The existence of magmatic belts younging northward implies that slabs of Asian mantle subducted one after another under ranges north of the Himalayas. Subduction was oblique and accompanied by extrusion along the left lateral strike-slip faults that slice Tibet's east side. These mechanisms, akin to plate tectonics hidden by thickening crust, with slip-partitioning, account for the dominant growth of the Tibet Plateau toward the east and northeast.

2,910 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Karakaya marginal sea was already closed by earliest Jurassic times because early Jurassic sediments unconformably overlie its deformed lithologies as discussed by the authors, and it was closed by collision of the Bitlis-Poturge fragment with Arabia.

2,899 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2008-Lithos
TL;DR: Two geochemical proxies are particularly important for the identification and classification of oceanic basalts: the Th-Nb proxy for crustal input and hence for demonstrating an oceanic, non-subduction setting; and the Ti-Yb proxy, for melting depth and hence indicating mantle temperature and thickness of the conductive lithosphere as mentioned in this paper.

2,487 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors summarize knowledge of the behavior of elements in the subduction system and highlight the physical and chemical processes that have been invoked as being important in controlling the composition of volcanic arc magmas.
Abstract: Volcanic arc magmas can be defined tectonically as magmas erupting from volcanic edifices above subducting oceanic lithosphere. They form a coherent magma type, characterized compositionally by their enrichment in large ion lithophile (LlL) elements relative to high field strength (HFS) elements. In terms of process, the predominant view is that the vast majority of volcanic arc magmas originate by melting of the underlying mantle wedge, which contains a component of aqueous fluid and/or melt derived from the subducting plate. Recently, opinions have converged over the key aspects of the physical model for magma generation above subduction zones (Davies & Stevenson 1992), namely: 1. that the mantle wedge experiences subduction-induced corner flow (e.g. Spiegelman & MacKenzie 1987); 2. that the subduction component reaches the fusible part of the mantle wedge by the three-stage process of (i) metasomatism of mantle lithosphere, followed by (ii) aqueous fluid release due to breakdown of hydrous minerals at depth (e.g. Wyllie 1983, Tatsumi et al 1983) and (iii) aqueous fluid migration, followed by hydrous melt migration, to the site of melting; 3. that slab-induced flow may be locally reversed beneath the arc itself, allowing mantle decompression to contribute to melt generation (e.g. Ida 1983). The simplified model in Figure 1 highlights the physical and chemical processes that have been invoked as being important in controlling the composition of volcanic arc magmas. Magma compositions (coupled with experimental data on element behavior) can help us gain further understanding of these physical and chemical processes. In this review, we first summarize knowledge of the behavior of elements in the subduction system. We then focus on compositional evidence for the processes illustrated in Figure 1, which we group as follows: 1. derivation of the subduction component, 2. transport of the subduction component to the melting column, 3. depletion and enrichment of the mantle wedge, and 4. processes in the melting column.

2,374 citations

Book Chapter
01 Jan 1982
TL;DR: In this paper, discrimination diagrams are drawn which highlight these various characteristics and therefore enable volcanic arc basalts to he recognized in cases where geological evidence is ambiguous, and the results indicate that the Oman ophiolite complex was made up of back-arc oceanic crust intruded by the products of volcanic arc magmatism.
Abstract: Volcanic are basalts are all characterized by a selective enrichment in incompatible elements of low ionic potential, a feature thought to be due to the input of aqueous fluids from subducted oceanic crust into their mantle source regions. Island arc basalts are additionally characterized by low abundances (for a given degree of fractional crystallization) of incompatible elements of high ionic potential, a feature for which high degrees of melting, stability of minor residual oxide phases, and remelting of depleted mantle are all possible explanations. Calc-alkaline basalts and shoshonites are additionally characterized by enrichment of Th, P, and the light REE in addition to elements of low ionic potential, a feature for which one popular explanation is the contamination of their mantle source regions by a melt derived from subducted sediment. By careful selection of variables, discrimination diagrams can be drawn which highlight these various characteristics and therefore enable volcanic arc basalts to he recognized in cases where geological evidence is ambiguous. Plots of Y against Cr, K[Yb, Ce/Yb, or Th/Yb against Ta/Yb, and Ce/Sr against Cr are all particularly successful and can be modelled in terms of vectors representing different petrogenctic processes. An additional plot of Ti/Y against Nb/Y is useful for identifying 'anomalous' volcanic arc settings such as Grenada and parts of the Aleutian arc. Intermediate and acid rocks from volcanic are settings can also be recognized using a simple plot of Ti against Zr. The lavas from the Oman ophiolite complex provide a good test of the application of these techniques. The results indicate that the complex was made up of back-arc oceanic crust intruded by the products of volcanic arc magmatism.

2,373 citations


Network Information
Related Topics (5)
Lithosphere
14.5K papers, 723.8K citations
98% related
Mantle (geology)
26.1K papers, 1.3M citations
95% related
Crust
20.7K papers, 933.1K citations
95% related
Fault (geology)
26.7K papers, 744.5K citations
95% related
Basalt
18.6K papers, 805.1K citations
92% related
Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20231,121
20222,198
20211,039
20201,029
2019892
2018882