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Surface tension

About: Surface tension is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 25410 publications have been published within this topic receiving 695471 citations.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The SMD model may be employed with other algorithms for solving the nonhomogeneous Poisson equation for continuum solvation calculations in which the solute is represented by its electron density in real space, including, for example, the conductor-like screening algorithm.
Abstract: We present a new continuum solvation model based on the quantum mechanical charge density of a solute molecule interacting with a continuum description of the solvent. The model is called SMD, where the “D” stands for “density” to denote that the full solute electron density is used without defining partial atomic charges. “Continuum” denotes that the solvent is not represented explicitly but rather as a dielectric medium with surface tension at the solute−solvent boundary. SMD is a universal solvation model, where “universal” denotes its applicability to any charged or uncharged solute in any solvent or liquid medium for which a few key descriptors are known (in particular, dielectric constant, refractive index, bulk surface tension, and acidity and basicity parameters). The model separates the observable solvation free energy into two main components. The first component is the bulk electrostatic contribution arising from a self-consistent reaction field treatment that involves the solution of the nonho...

10,945 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a force density proportional to the surface curvature of constant color is defined at each point in the transition region; this force-density is normalized in such a way that the conventional description of surface tension on an interface is recovered when the ratio of local transition-reion thickness to local curvature radius approaches zero.

7,863 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a method for measuring the surface energy of solids and for resolving surface energy into contributions from dispersion and dipole-hydrogen bonding forces has been developed based on the measurement of contact angles with water and methylene iodide.
Abstract: A method for measuring the surface energy of solids and for resolving the surface energy into contributions from dispersion and dipole-hydrogen bonding forces has been developed. It is based on the measurement of contact angles with water and methylene iodide. Good agreement has been obtained with the more laborious γc method. Evidence for a finite value of liquid-solid interfacial tension at zero contact angle is presented. The method is especially applicable to the surface characterization of polymers.

7,695 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Dec 1991-Proteins
TL;DR: It is demonstrated in this work that the surface tension, water‐organic solvent, transfer‐free energies and the thermodynamics of melting of linear alkanes provide fundamental insights into the nonpolar driving forces for protein folding and protein binding reactions.
Abstract: We demonstrate in this work that the surface tension, water-organic solvent, transfer-free energies and the thermodynamics of melting of linear alkanes provide fundamental insights into the nonpolar driving forces for protein folding and protein binding reactions. We first develop a model for the curvature dependence of the hydrophobic effect and find that the macroscopic concept of interfacial free energy is applicable at the molecular level. Application of a well-known relationship involving surface tension and adhesion energies reveals that dispersion forces play little or no net role in hydrophobic interactions; rather, the standard model of disruption of water structure (entropically driven at 25 degrees C) is correct. The hydrophobic interaction is found, in agreement with the classical picture, to provide a major driving force for protein folding. Analysis of the melting behavior of hydrocarbons reveals that close packing of the protein interior makes only a small free energy contribution to folding because the enthalpic gain resulting from increased dispersion interactions (relative to the liquid) is countered by the freezing of side chain motion. The identical effect should occur in association reactions, which may provide an enormous simplification in the evaluation of binding energies. Protein binding reactions, even between nearly planar or concave/convex interfaces, are found to have effective hydrophobicities considerably smaller than the prediction based on macroscopic surface tension. This is due to the formation of a concave collar region that usually accompanies complex formation. This effect may preclude the formation of complexes between convex surfaces.

5,295 citations

Book
01 Jan 1977
TL;DR: Colloid and surface chemistry - scope and variables sedimentation and diffusion and their equilibrium solution thermodynamics - osmotic and Donnan equilibria the rheology of dispersions static and dynamic light scattering and other radiation scattering surface tension and contact angle - application to pure substances adsorption from solution and monolayer formation colloidal structures in surfactant solutions - association colloids adsorction at gas-solid interfaces van der Waals forces the electrical double layer and double-layer interactions electrophoresis and other electrokinetic phenomena electrostatic and polymer-induced
Abstract: Colloid and surface chemistry - scope and variables sedimentation and diffusion and their equilibrium solution thermodynamics - osmotic and Donnan equilibria the rheology of dispersions static and dynamic light scattering and other radiation scattering surface tension and contact angle - application to pure substances adsorption from solution and monolayer formation colloidal structures in surfactant solutions - association colloids adsorption at gas-solid interfaces van der Waals forces the electrical double layer and double-layer interactions electrophoresis and other electrokinetic phenomena electrostatic and polymer-induced colloid stability appendix A - examples of expansions encountered in this book appendix B - units - CGS-SI interconversions appendix C - statistics of discrete and continuous distributions of data appendix D - list of worked-out examples

4,177 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20231,074
20222,426
2021804
2020816
2019843
2018828