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Tanzania

About: Tanzania is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 10792 publications have been published within this topic receiving 101494 citations. The topic is also known as: United Republic of Tanzania & tz.


Papers
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01 Jan 2010
Abstract: Erkki Tomppo1, Matti Katila1, Kai Mäkisara1, Jouni Peräsaari1, Rogers Malimbwi2, Nurudin Chamuya3, Jared Otieno3, Søren Dalsgaard4, Mikko Leppänen5 1 Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa, Finland PO Box 18 (Jokiniemenkuja 1) FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland tel: +358 10 211 2170, fax: 358 10 211 2202 email erkki.tomppo@metla.fi 2 Sokoine University of Agriculture, the United Rebublic of Tanzania 3 Forest and Beekeeping Division of Ministry of Natural Resources, the United Rebublic of Tanzania 4 Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Dar es Salaam 5 Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome

913 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper examined how government policies affect ethnic relations by comparing outcomes across two nearby districts, one in Kenya and one in Tanzania, using colonial-era boundary placement as a "natural experiment".
Abstract: This article examines how government policies affect ethnic relations by comparing outcomes across two nearby districts, one in Kenya and one in Tanzania, using colonial-era boundary placement as a “natural experiment.” Despite similar geography and historical legacies, governments in Kenya and Tanzania have followed radically different language, education, and local institutional policies, with Tanzania consistently pursuing more serious nation building. The evidence suggests that nation building has allowed diverse communities in rural Tanzania to achieve considerably better local public goods outcomes than diverse communities in Kenya. To illustrate, while Kenyan communities at mean levels of diversity have 25 percent less local school funding than homogeneous communities on average, the comparable figure in the Tanzanian district is near zero. The Kenya-Tanzania comparison provides empirical evidence that serious reforms can ameliorate social divisions and suggests that nation-building should take a place on policy agendas, especially in Africa.

590 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1977

483 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, multinomial logistic regression techniques are used to estimate personal and familial determinants of children's participation and progress in school in seven sub-Saharan African countries.
Abstract: Multinomial logistic regression techniques are used to estimate personal and familial determinants of childrens participation and progress in school in seven sub-Saharan African countries. Data are obtained from Demographic and Health Surveys for Kenya and Tanzania Cameroon and Niger and Malawi Namibia and Zambia. Findings indicate that most 10-14 year olds were currently enrolled in school with the exception of Niger. However few in this age group completed the first four years of primary education. Four conclusions are drawn. 1) Family and household characteristics in particular education of the head and living standard determined whether a child was enrolled and how rapidly the child advanced by grade level. Both factors were important but education of the head appeared to be the most important factor in explaining current enrollment rates and the timing of school entry. Standard of living was associated with the widest differences in attainment of four grade levels. 2) The chances of enrollment and progress in school appeared to be unrelated to the survival of parents. 3) Children benefitted educationally more from female headed households when compared to male headed households at the same resource level. 4) Specific gender differences varied by country. Family and household circumstances did not operate systematically across countries to the advantage of boys or girls. The proportion of children aged 10 years currently attending school who were at the appropriate grade level ranged from 96% in Tanzania to 59% in Malawi. By the age of 14 years the respective proportions were from 56% to 25%. The drop was attributed in part to grade repetition. The proportion who completed grade 4 by age 14 out of the ever-enrolled was 79% in Kenya 74% in Zambia 73% in Tanzania 68% in Cameroon 58% in Namibia 44% in Malawi and 23% in Niger.

466 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20245
20231,485
20223,014
2021376
2020467
2019482