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Thermal conductivity

About: Thermal conductivity is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 72435 publications have been published within this topic receiving 1468493 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The extremely high value of the thermal conductivity suggests that graphene can outperform carbon nanotubes in heat conduction and establishes graphene as an excellent material for thermal management.
Abstract: We report the measurement of the thermal conductivity of a suspended single-layer graphene. The room temperature values of the thermal conductivity in the range ∼(4.84 ± 0.44) × 103 to (5.30 ± 0.48) × 103 W/mK were extracted for a single-layer graphene from the dependence of the Raman G peak frequency on the excitation laser power and independently measured G peak temperature coefficient. The extremely high value of the thermal conductivity suggests that graphene can outperform carbon nanotubes in heat conduction. The superb thermal conduction property of graphene is beneficial for the proposed electronic applications and establishes graphene as an excellent material for thermal management.

11,878 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Nov 1931-Physics
TL;DR: In this article, the authors used Darcey's law to derive the equation K∇2ψ+∇K·∇ψ +g∂K/∂z=−ρsA∆ψ/∆t for the capillary conduction of liquids in porous mediums.
Abstract: The flow of liquids in unsaturated porous mediums follows the ordinary laws of hydrodynamics, the motion being produced by gravity and the pressure gradient force acting in the liquid. By making use of Darcey's law, that flow is proportional to the forces producing flow, the equation K∇2ψ+∇K·∇ψ+g∂K/∂z=−ρsA∂ψ/∂t may be derived for the capillary conduction of liquids in porous mediums. It is possible experimentally to determine the capillary potential ψ=∫dp/ρ, the capillary conductivity K, which is defined by the flow equation q=K(g−▿ψ), and the capillary capacity A, which is the rate of change of the liquid content of the medium with respect to ψ. These variables are analogous, respectively, to the temperature, thermal conductivity, and thermal capacity in the case of heat flow. Data are presented and application of the equations is made for the capillary conduction of water through soil and clay but the mathematical formulations and the experimental methods developed may be used to express capillary flow ...

5,340 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The thermal properties of carbon materials are reviewed, focusing on recent results for graphene, carbon nanotubes and nanostructured carbon materials with different degrees of disorder, with special attention given to the unusual size dependence of heat conduction in two-dimensional crystals.
Abstract: Recent years have seen a rapid growth of interest by the scientific and engineering communities in the thermal properties of materials. Heat removal has become a crucial issue for continuing progress in the electronic industry, and thermal conduction in low-dimensional structures has revealed truly intriguing features. Carbon allotropes and their derivatives occupy a unique place in terms of their ability to conduct heat. The room-temperature thermal conductivity of carbon materials span an extraordinary large range--of over five orders of magnitude--from the lowest in amorphous carbons to the highest in graphene and carbon nanotubes. Here, I review the thermal properties of carbon materials focusing on recent results for graphene, carbon nanotubes and nanostructured carbon materials with different degrees of disorder. Special attention is given to the unusual size dependence of heat conduction in two-dimensional crystals and, specifically, in graphene. I also describe the prospects of applications of graphene and carbon materials for thermal management of electronics.

5,189 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
17 Apr 2014-Nature
TL;DR: An unprecedented ZT of 2.6 ± 0.3 at 923 K is reported in SnSe single crystals measured along the b axis of the room-temperature orthorhombic unit cell, which highlights alternative strategies to nanostructuring for achieving high thermoelectric performance.
Abstract: The thermoelectric effect enables direct and reversible conversion between thermal and electrical energy, and provides a viable route for power generation from waste heat The efficiency of thermoelectric materials is dictated by the dimensionless figure of merit, ZT (where Z is the figure of merit and T is absolute temperature), which governs the Carnot efficiency for heat conversion Enhancements above the generally high threshold value of 25 have important implications for commercial deployment, especially for compounds free of Pb and Te Here we report an unprecedented ZT of 26 ± 03 at 923 K, realized in SnSe single crystals measured along the b axis of the room-temperature orthorhombic unit cell This material also shows a high ZT of 23 ± 03 along the c axis but a significantly reduced ZT of 08 ± 02 along the a axis We attribute the remarkably high ZT along the b axis to the intrinsically ultralow lattice thermal conductivity in SnSe The layered structure of SnSe derives from a distorted rock-salt structure, and features anomalously high Gruneisen parameters, which reflect the anharmonic and anisotropic bonding We attribute the exceptionally low lattice thermal conductivity (023 ± 003 W m(-1) K(-1) at 973 K) in SnSe to the anharmonicity These findings highlight alternative strategies to nanostructuring for achieving high thermoelectric performance

3,823 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20233,488
20226,698
20214,016
20204,144
20194,248
20183,947