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Thresholding

About: Thresholding is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 16268 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 357752 citation(s).
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
Chris Stauffer1, W.E.L. Grimson1Institutions (1)
23 Jun 1999-
TL;DR: This paper discusses modeling each pixel as a mixture of Gaussians and using an on-line approximation to update the model, resulting in a stable, real-time outdoor tracker which reliably deals with lighting changes, repetitive motions from clutter, and long-term scene changes.
Abstract: A common method for real-time segmentation of moving regions in image sequences involves "background subtraction", or thresholding the error between an estimate of the image without moving objects and the current image. The numerous approaches to this problem differ in the type of background model used and the procedure used to update the model. This paper discusses modeling each pixel as a mixture of Gaussians and using an on-line approximation to update the model. The Gaussian, distributions of the adaptive mixture model are then evaluated to determine which are most likely to result from a background process. Each pixel is classified based on whether the Gaussian distribution which represents it most effectively is considered part of the background model. This results in a stable, real-time outdoor tracker which reliably deals with lighting changes, repetitive motions from clutter, and long-term scene changes. This system has been run almost continuously for 16 months, 24 hours a day, through rain and snow.

7,436 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Practical incoherent undersampling schemes are developed and analyzed by means of their aliasing interference and demonstrate improved spatial resolution and accelerated acquisition for multislice fast spin‐echo brain imaging and 3D contrast enhanced angiography.
Abstract: The sparsity which is implicit in MR images is exploited to significantly undersample k -space. Some MR images such as angiograms are already sparse in the pixel representation; other, more complicated images have a sparse representation in some transform domain–for example, in terms of spatial finite-differences or their wavelet coefficients. According to the recently developed mathematical theory of compressedsensing, images with a sparse representation can be recovered from randomly undersampled k -space data, provided an appropriate nonlinear recovery scheme is used. Intuitively, artifacts due to random undersampling add as noise-like interference. In the sparse transform domain the significant coefficients stand out above the interference. A nonlinear thresholding scheme can recover the sparse coefficients, effectively recovering the image itself. In this article, practical incoherent undersampling schemes are developed and analyzed by means of their aliasing interference. Incoherence is introduced by pseudo-random variable-density undersampling of phase-encodes. The reconstruction is performed by minimizing the 1 norm of a transformed image, subject to data

5,802 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
David L. Donoho1, Iain M. Johnstone1Institutions (1)
Abstract: We attempt to recover a function of unknown smoothness from noisy sampled data. We introduce a procedure, SureShrink, that suppresses noise by thresholding the empirical wavelet coefficients. The thresholding is adaptive: A threshold level is assigned to each dyadic resolution level by the principle of minimizing the Stein unbiased estimate of risk (Sure) for threshold estimates. The computational effort of the overall procedure is order N · log(N) as a function of the sample size N. SureShrink is smoothness adaptive: If the unknown function contains jumps, then the reconstruction (essentially) does also; if the unknown function has a smooth piece, then the reconstruction is (essentially) as smooth as the mother wavelet will allow. The procedure is in a sense optimally smoothness adaptive: It is near minimax simultaneously over a whole interval of the Besov scale; the size of this interval depends on the choice of mother wavelet. We know from a previous paper by the authors that traditional smoot...

4,498 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Mehmet Sezgin1, Bulent SankurInstitutions (1)
TL;DR: 40 selected thresholding methods from various categories are compared in the context of nondestructive testing applications as well as for document images, and the thresholding algorithms that perform uniformly better over nonde- structive testing and document image applications are identified.
Abstract: We conduct an exhaustive survey of image thresholding methods, categorize them, express their formulas under a uniform notation, and finally carry their performance comparison. The thresholding methods are categorized according to the information they are exploiting, such as histogram shape, measurement space clustering, entropy, object attributes, spatial correlation, and local gray-level surface. 40 selected thresholding methods from various categories are compared in the context of nondestructive testing applications as well as for document images. The comparison is based on the combined performance measures. We identify the thresholding algorithms that perform uniformly better over nonde- structive testing and document image applications. © 2004 SPIE and IS&T. (DOI: 10.1117/1.1631316)

4,261 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2009-NeuroImage
TL;DR: A new method is proposed which attempts to keep the sensitivity benefits of cluster-based thresholding (and indeed the general concept of "clusters" of signal), while avoiding (or at least minimising) these problems, and is referred to as "threshold-free cluster enhancement" (TFCE).
Abstract: Many image enhancement and thresholding techniques make use of spatial neighbourhood information to boost belief in extended areas of signal. The most common such approach in neuroimaging is cluster-based thresholding, which is often more sensitive than voxel-wise thresholding. However, a limitation is the need to define the initial cluster-forming threshold. This threshold is arbitrary, and yet its exact choice can have a large impact on the results, particularly at the lower (e.g., t, z < 4) cluster-forming thresholds frequently used. Furthermore, the amount of spatial pre-smoothing is also arbitrary (given that the expected signal extent is very rarely known in advance of the analysis). In the light of such problems, we propose a new method which attempts to keep the sensitivity benefits of cluster-based thresholding (and indeed the general concept of “clusters” of signal), while avoiding (or at least minimising) these problems. The method takes a raw statistic image and produces an output image in which the voxel-wise values represent the amount of cluster-like local spatial support. The method is thus referred to as “threshold-free cluster enhancement” (TFCE). We present the TFCE approach and discuss in detail ROC-based optimisation and comparisons with cluster-based and voxel-based thresholding. We find that TFCE gives generally better sensitivity than other methods over a wide range of test signal shapes and SNR values. We also show an example on a real imaging dataset, suggesting that TFCE does indeed provide not just improved sensitivity, but richer and more interpretable output than cluster-based thresholding.

3,811 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202215
2021715
2020834
2019969
2018934
2017960