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Transmission Control Protocol

About: Transmission Control Protocol is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 7710 publications have been published within this topic receiving 124581 citations. The topic is also known as: TCP & Three-way handshake.


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01 Sep 1981

3,411 citations

28 Aug 1980
TL;DR: UDP does not guarantee reliability or ordering in the way that TCP does, but its stateless nature is also useful for servers that answer small queries from huge numbers of clients.
Abstract: UDP does not guarantee reliability or ordering in the way that TCP does. Datagrams may arrive out of order, appear duplicated, or go missing without notice. Avoiding the overhead of checking whether every packet actually arrived makes UDP faster and more efficient, at least for applications that do not need guaranteed delivery. Time-sensitive applications often use UDP because dropped packets are preferable to delayed packets. UDP's stateless nature is also useful for servers that answer small queries from huge numbers of clients. Unlike TCP, UDP supports packet broadcast (sending to all on local network) and multicasting (send to all subscribers).

2,485 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
30 Aug 2010
TL;DR: DCTCP enables the applications to handle 10X the current background traffic, without impacting foreground traffic, thus largely eliminating incast problems, and delivers the same or better throughput than TCP, while using 90% less buffer space.
Abstract: Cloud data centers host diverse applications, mixing workloads that require small predictable latency with others requiring large sustained throughput. In this environment, today's state-of-the-art TCP protocol falls short. We present measurements of a 6000 server production cluster and reveal impairments that lead to high application latencies, rooted in TCP's demands on the limited buffer space available in data center switches. For example, bandwidth hungry "background" flows build up queues at the switches, and thus impact the performance of latency sensitive "foreground" traffic.To address these problems, we propose DCTCP, a TCP-like protocol for data center networks. DCTCP leverages Explicit Congestion Notification (ECN) in the network to provide multi-bit feedback to the end hosts. We evaluate DCTCP at 1 and 10Gbps speeds using commodity, shallow buffered switches. We find DCTCP delivers the same or better throughput than TCP, while using 90% less buffer space. Unlike TCP, DCTCP also provides high burst tolerance and low latency for short flows. In handling workloads derived from operational measurements, we found DCTCP enables the applications to handle 10X the current background traffic, without impacting foreground traffic. Further, a 10X increase in foreground traffic does not cause any timeouts, thus largely eliminating incast problems.

1,734 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jul 1997
TL;DR: A performance model for the TCP Congestion Avoidance algorithm that predicts the bandwidth of a sustained TCP connection subjected to light to moderate packet losses, such as loss caused by network congestion is analyzed.
Abstract: In this paper, we analyze a performance model for the TCP Congestion Avoidance algorithm. The model predicts the bandwidth of a sustained TCP connection subjected to light to moderate packet losses, such as loss caused by network congestion. It assumes that TCP avoids retransmission timeouts and always has sufficient receiver window and sender data. The model predicts the Congestion Avoidance performance of nearly all TCP implementations under restricted conditions and of TCP with Selective Acknowledgements over a much wider range of Internet conditions.We verify the model through both simulation and live Internet measurements. The simulations test several TCP implementations under a range of loss conditions and in environments with both drop-tail and RED queuing. The model is also compared to live Internet measurements using the TReno diagnostic and real TCP implementations.We also present several applications of the model to problems of bandwidth allocation in the Internet. We use the model to analyze networks with multiple congested gateways; this analysis shows strong agreement with prior work in this area. Finally, we present several important implications about the behavior of the Internet in the presence of high load from diverse user communities.

1,580 citations

01 Apr 1998
TL;DR: The Real Time Streaming Protocol, or RTSP, is an application-level protocol for control over the delivery of data with real-time properties that is intended to control multiple data delivery sessions, provide a means for choosing delivery channels such as UDP, multicast UDP and TCP, and provide a mean for choosing Delivery mechanisms based upon RTP (RFC 1889).
Abstract: The Real Time Streaming Protocol, or RTSP, is an application-level protocol for control over the delivery of data with real-time properties. RTSP provides an extensible framework to enable controlled, on-demand delivery of real-time data, such as audio and video. Sources of data can include both live data feeds and stored clips. This protocol is intended to control multiple data delivery sessions, provide a means for choosing delivery channels such as UDP, multicast UDP and TCP, and provide a means for choosing delivery mechanisms based upon RTP (RFC 1889).

1,452 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202336
202288
2021130
2020228
2019297
2018276