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Transmission delay

About: Transmission delay is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 16975 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 248206 citation(s).


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The busy-tone multiple-access mode is introduced and analyzed as a natural extension of CSMA to eliminate the hidden-terminal problem and results show that BTMA with hidden terminals performs almost as well as CSMA without hidden terminals.
Abstract: We consider a population of terminals communicating with a central station over a packet-switched multiple-access radio channel. The performance of carrier sense multiple access (CSMA) [1] used as a method for multiplexing these terminals is highly dependent on the ability of each terminal to sense the carrier of any other transmission on the channel. Many situations exist in which some terminals are "hidden" from each other (either because they are out-of-sight or out-of-range). In this paper we show that the existence of hidden terminals significantly degrades the performance of CSMA. Furthermore, we introduce and analyze the busy-tone multiple-access (BTMA) mode as a natural extension of CSMA to eliminate the hidden-terminal problem. Numerical results giving the bandwidth utilization and packet delays are shown, illustrating that BTMA with hidden terminals performs almost as well as CSMA without hidden terminals.

1,746 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Robert M. Metcalfe1, David R. Boggs1
TL;DR: The design principles and implementation are described, based on experience with an operating Ethernet of 100 nodes along a kilometer of coaxial cable, of a model for estimating performance under heavy loads and a packet protocol for error controlled communication.
Abstract: Ethernet is a branching broadcast communication system for carrying digital data packets among locally distributed computing stations. The packet transport mechanism provided by Ethernet has been used to build systems which can be viewed as either local computer networks or loosely coupled multiprocessors. An Ethernet's shared communication facility, its Ether, is a passive broadcast medium with no central control. Coordination of access to the Ether for packet broadcasts is distributed among the contending transmitting stations using controlled statistical arbitration. Switching of packets to their destinations on the Ether is distributed among the receiving stations using packet address recognition. Design principles and implementation are described, based on experience with an operating Ethernet of 100 nodes along a kilometer of coaxial cable. A model for estimating performance under heavy loads and a packet protocol for error controlled communication are included for completeness.

1,697 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Oct 1997
TL;DR: The prevalence of unusual network events such as out-of-order delivery and packet corruption are characterized and a robust receiver-based algorithm for estimating "bottleneck bandwidth" is discussed that addresses deficiencies discovered in techniques based on "packet pair".
Abstract: We discuss findings from a large-scale study of Internet packet dynamics conducted by tracing 20,000 TCP bulk transfers between 35 Internet sites. Because we traced each 100 Kbyte transfer at both the sender and the receiver, the measurements allow us to distinguish between the end-to-end behaviors due to the different directions of the Internet paths, which often exhibit asymmetries. We characterize the prevalence of unusual network events such as out-of-order delivery and packet corruption; discuss a robust receiver-based algorithm for estimating "bottleneck bandwidth" that addresses deficiencies discovered in techniques based on "packet pair"; investigate patterns of packet loss, finding that loss events are not well-modeled as independent and, furthermore, that the distribution of the duration of loss events exhibits infinite variance; and analyze variations in packet transit delays as indicators of congestion periods, finding that congestion periods also span a wide range of time scales.

1,233 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
07 Nov 2002
TL;DR: This work proposes using coordinates-based mechanisms in a peer-to-peer architecture to predict Internet network distance (i.e. round-trip propagation and transmission delay), and proposes the GNP approach, based on absolute coordinates computed from modeling the Internet as a geometric space.
Abstract: We propose using coordinates-based mechanisms in a peer-to-peer architecture to predict Internet network distance (i.e. round-trip propagation and transmission delay). We study two mechanisms. The first is a previously proposed scheme, called the triangulated heuristic, which is based on relative coordinates that are simply the distances from a host to some special network nodes. We propose the second mechanism, called global network positioning (GNP), which is based on absolute coordinates computed from modeling the Internet as a geometric space. Since end hosts maintain their own coordinates, these approaches allow end hosts to compute their inter-host distances as soon as they discover each other. Moreover, coordinates are very efficient in summarizing inter-host distances, making these approaches very scalable. By performing experiments using measured Internet distance data, we show that both coordinates-based schemes are more accurate than the existing state of the art system IDMaps, and the GNP approach achieves the highest accuracy and robustness among them.

1,166 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Simulation results have shown that the proposed event-triggering scheme is superior to some existing event- triggering schemes in the literature.
Abstract: This note is concerned with event-triggered H∞ controller design for networked control systems. A novel event-triggering scheme is proposed, which has some advantages over some existing schemes. A delay system model for the analysis is firstly constructed by investigating the effect of the network transmission delay. Then, based on this model, criteria for stability with an H∞ norm bound and criteria for co-designing both the feedback gain and the trigger parameters are derived. These criteria are formulated in terms of linear matrix inequalities. Simulation results have shown that the proposed event-triggering scheme is superior to some existing event-triggering schemes in the literature.

1,023 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20225
2021288
2020407
2019469
2018426
2017548