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Trigonella

About: Trigonella is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 2274 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 32361 citation(s).
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Journal Article
TL;DR: Preliminary animal and human trials suggest possible hypoglycemic and antihyperlipidemic properties of oral fenugreek seed powder.
Abstract: Fenugreek has a long history of medical uses in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine, and has been used for numerous indications, including labor induction, aiding digestion, and as a general tonic to improve metabolism and health. Preliminary animal and human trials suggest possible hypoglycemic and antihyperlipidemic properties of oral fenugreek seed powder. (Altern Med Rev 2003;8(1):20-27)

463 citations


Journal Article
TL;DR: Results indicate the usefulness of fenugreek seeds in the management of diabetes and significantly reduced fasting blood sugar and improved the glucose tolerance test.
Abstract: The effect of fenugreek seeds (Trigonella foenum graecum) on blood glucose and the serum lipid profile was evaluated in insulin-dependent (Type I) diabetic patients. Isocaloric diets with and without fenugreek were each given randomly for 10 d. Defatted fenugreek seed powder (100 g), divided into two equal doses, was incorporated into the diet and served during lunch and dinner. The fenugreek diet significantly reduced fasting blood sugar and improved the glucose tolerance test. There was a 54 per cent reduction in 24-h urinary glucose excretion. Serum total cholesterol, LDL and VLDL cholesterol and triglycerides were also significantly reduced. The HDL cholesterol fraction, however, remained unchanged. These results indicate the usefulness of fenugreek seeds in the management of diabetes.

394 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In patients with CAD powdered ginger administered in a dose of 4 g daily for 3 months did not affect ADP- and epinephrine-induced platelet aggregation, and no change in the fibrinolytic activity and fibrinogen level was observed.
Abstract: In a placebo-controlled study the effect of ginger and fenugreek was examined on blood lipids, blood sugar, platelet aggregation, fibrinogen and fibrinolytic activity. The subjects included in this study were healthy individuals, patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) who either had CAD or were without CAD. In patients with CAD powdered ginger administered in a dose of 4 g daily for 3 months did not affect ADP- and epinephrine-induced platelet aggregation. Also, no change in the fibrinolytic activity and fibrinogen level was observed. However, a single dose of 10 g powdered ginger administered to CAD patients produced a significant reduction in platelet aggregation induced by the two agonists. Ginger did not affect the blood lipids and blood sugar. Fenugreek given in a dose of 2.5 g twice daily for 3 months to healthy individuals did not affect the blood lipids and blood sugar (fasting and post prandial). However, administered in the same daily dose for the same duration to CAD patients also with NIDDM, fenugreek decreased significantly the blood lipids (total cholesterol and triglycerides) without affecting the HDL-c. When administered in the same daily dose to NIDDM (non-CAD) patients (mild cases), fenugreek reduced significantly the blood sugar (fasting and post prandial). In severe NIDDM cases, blood sugar (both fasting and post prandial) was only slightly reduced. The changes were not significant. Fenugreek administration did not affect platelet aggregation, fibrinolytic activity and fibrinogen.

329 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The therapeutic role of Trigonella seed powder in type1 diabetes as exemplified in this study can be attributed to the change of glucose and lipid metabolising enzyme activities to normal values, thus stabilizing glucose homeostasis in the liver and kidney.
Abstract: Trigonella foenum graecum (fenugreek) seed powder has been suggested to have potential antidiabetic effects. The effect of oral administration of Trigonella whole seed powder (5% in the diet) for 21 days on glycolytic, gluconeogenic and NADPlinked lipogenic enzymes were studied in liver and kidney tissues of alloxan-induced diabetic Wistar rats. Diabetic rats were characterised by a 4fold higher blood glucose level and a 0.7fold lower body weight compared to normal controls. The activities of the glycolytic enzymes were significantly lower in the diabetic liver and higher in the diabetic kidney. The activities of gluconeogenic enzymes were higher in both liver and kidney during diabetes, however the activities of the lipogenic enzymes were decreased in both tissues during diabetes. Trigonella seed powder treatment to diabetic rats for 21 days brought down the elevated fasting blood glucose levels to control levels. The altered enzyme activities were significantly restored to control values in both the liver and kidney after Trigonella seed powder treatment. The therapeutic role of Trigonella seed powder in type1 diabetes as exemplified in this study can be attributed to the change of glucose and lipid metabolising enzyme activities to normal values, thus stabilizing glucose homeostasis in the liver and kidney. These biochemical effects exerted by Trigonella seeds make it a possible new therapeutic in type1 diabetes.

280 citations


Journal Article
TL;DR: Results from the in vitro experiments indicated that diosgenin inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in the HT-29 human colon cancer cell line in a dose-dependent manner and seems to have potential as a novel colon cancer preventive agent.
Abstract: Trigonella foenum graecum (fenugreek) is traditionally used to treat disorders such as diabetes, high cholesterol, wounds, inflammation, and gastrointestinal ailments. Recent studies suggest that fenugreek and its active constituents may possess anticarcinogenic potential. We evaluated the preventive efficacy of dietary fenugreek seed and its major steroidal saponin constituent, diosgenin, on azoxymethane-induced rat colon carcinogenesis during initiation and promotion stages. Preneoplastic colonic lesions or aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were chosen as end points. In addition, we assessed the mechanism of tumor growth inhibition of diosgenin in HT-29 human colon cancer cells. To evaluate the effect of the test agent during the initiation and postinitiation stages, 7-week-old male F344 rats were fed experimental diets containing 0% or 1% fenugreek seed powder (FSP) or 0.05% or 0.1% diosgenin for 1 week and were injected with azoxymethane (15 mg/kg body weight). Effects during the promotional stage were studied by feeding 1% FSP or 0.1% diosgenin 4 weeks after the azoxymethane injections. Rats were sacrificed 8 weeks after azoxymethane injection, and their colons were evaluated for ACF. We found that, by comparison with control, continuous feeding of 1% FSP and 0.05% and 0.1% diosgenin suppressed total colonic ACF up to 32%, 24%, and 42%, respectively (P < or = 0.001 to 0.0001). Dietary FSP at 1% and diosgenin at 0.1% fed only during the promotional stage also inhibited total ACF up to 33% (P < or = 0.001) and 39% (P < or = 0.0001), respectively. Importantly, continuous feeding of 1% FSP or 0.05% or 0.1% diosgenin reduced the number of multicrypt foci by 38%, 20%, and 36% by comparison with the control assay (P < or = 0.001). In addition, 1% FSP or 0.1% diosgenin fed during the promotional stage caused a significant reduction (P < or = 0.001) of multicrypt foci compared with control. Dietary diosgenin at 0.1% and 0.05% inhibited total colonic ACF and multicrypt foci formation in a dose-dependent manner. Results from the in vitro experiments indicated that diosgenin inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in the HT-29 human colon cancer cell line in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, diosgenin induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells at least in part by inhibition of bcl-2 and by induction of caspase-3 protein expression. On the basis of these findings, the fenugreek constituent diosgenin seems to have potential as a novel colon cancer preventive agent.

280 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2021106
2020123
2019117
2018146
2017151
2016124

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Topic's top 5 most impactful authors

Krishnapura Srinivasan

13 papers, 397 citations

Ali Mehrafarin

10 papers, 178 citations

Surya Acharya

7 papers, 329 citations

Rabiaa Haouala

6 papers, 105 citations

Anand Swaroop

5 papers, 118 citations