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Trimethyltin Compounds

About: Trimethyltin Compounds is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 32 publications have been published within this topic receiving 1229 citations.

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TL;DR: Treatment of rats with trimethyltin provides a chronic preparation with consistent lesions in the hippocampus of use in other behavioral and neuroanatomic studies.
Abstract: Trimethyltin, when given by gavage to rats, has an LD50 of 12.6 mg/kg. Signs of poisoning include tremors, hyperexcitability, aggressive behavior, weight loss, and convulsions. After single (10 mg/kg) or repeated weekly doses (a maximum of four) of 4 mg/kg, rats, up to a survival time of 70 days, were perfusion-fixed for light microscopy. Trimethyltin was assayed in brain and blood in rats after similar treatments. Trimethyltin is cumulative and persistent and binds with high affinity to hemoglobin. Trimethyltin, unlike triethyltin, does not produce white matter edema in rats but does cause bilateral and symmetrical neuronal alterations involving the hippocampus (largely sparing the Sommer sector), pyriform cortex, amygdaloid nucleus, and neocortex. The earliest alteration was loss or dispersal of Nissl substance, then clumping of nuclear chromatin, followed by shrinkage and fragmentation of the nucleus within shrunken eosinophilic cytoplasm. These changes were associated with approximately 1.4 microgram trimethyltin/g wet weight in brain tissue 1 day after the second dose of 4 mg/kg or 2 days after a single dose of 10 mg/kg. Signs of poisoning gradually disappeared, and 4 rats surviving 70 days appeared normal, although their brains had severe damage with cell loss in the hippocampi and each pyriform cortex. Treatment of rats with trimethyltin, therefore, provides a chronic preparation with consistent lesions in the hippocampus of use in other behavioral and neuroanatomic studies. (Am J Pathol 97:59--82, 1979).

270 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
14 Aug 1981-Science
TL;DR: The formation of tetramethyltin occurs in estuarine sediments by both abiotic and biologically enhanced pathways, and a redistribution mechanism accounts for at least the abiotic pathway and possibly both formation pathways.
Abstract: : Both biologically active and autoclaved sediments convert trimethyltin hydroxide to the volatile tetramethyltin. Larger amounts of tetramethyltin were formed in the bioactive sediments than in the sterile sediments. No volatile tin compounds were detected in the absence of trimethyltin hydroxide or from trimethyltin hydroxide in seawater or in seawater containing bentonite. The formation of tetramethyltin is slow, taking over 80 days at 16 deg C to reach a maximum. The extent of conversion, although significant, is not extensive. The formation of tetramethyltin occurs in estuarine sediments by both abiotic and biologically enhanced pathways. A redistribution mechanism accounts for at least the abiotic pathway and possibly both formation pathways.

94 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: These results offered additional evidence that CA3 pyramidal neurons or their connections play an important, if not essential, role in radial-arm maze performance and learning and memory processes.
Abstract: Rats were trained for fifteen sessions in an automated eight arm radial maze prior to treatment with 6 mg/kg trimethyltin chloride. This compound is a neurotoxicant which primarily damages the limbic system, in particular pyramidal cells in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Following treatment the animals exhibited a marked and persistent impairment of maze performance characterized by decreased selection accuracy and an altered spatial pattern of responding within the maze. These results offered additional evidence that CA3 pyramidal neurons or their connections play an important, if not essential, role in radial-arm maze performance. It was suggested that trimethyltin might be a useful tool for elucidating the neural substrates of both radial maze performance and learning and memory processes.

84 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is shown that activated caspase-3, which is known to play a pivotal role in apoptotic processes, is clearly expressed by degenerating neurons and Inducible cyclooxygenase is also expressed at cytoplasmic level by degenerate granular neurons, suggesting that this enzyme may participate in TMT-induced neurodegeneration.

63 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20162
20152
20131
20072
20051
20041