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Trivalent influenza vaccine

About: Trivalent influenza vaccine is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 659 publications have been published within this topic receiving 26830 citations.


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TL;DR: This report updates the 2000 recommendations by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices on the use of influenza vaccine and antiviral agents with new or updated information regarding the cost-effectiveness of influenza vaccination and the 2001-2002 trivalent vaccine virus strains.
Abstract: This report updates the 2002 recommendations by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) on the use of influenza vaccine and antiviral agents (CDC. Prevention and Control of Influenza: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices [ACIP]. MMWR 2002;51 [No. RR-3]:1-31). The 2003 recommendations include new or updated information regarding 1) the timing of influenza vaccination by age and risk group; 2) influenza vaccine for children aged 6-23 months; 3) the 2003-2004 trivalent inactivated vaccine virus strains: A/Moscow/10/99 (H3N2)-like, A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1)-like, and B/Hong Kong/330/2001-like antigens (for the A/Moscow/10/99 [H3N2]-like antigen, manufacturers will use the antigenically equivalent A/Panama/2007/99 [H3N2] virus, and for the B/Hong Kong/330/2001-like antigen, manufacturers will use either B/Hong Kong/330/2001 or the antigenically equivalent B/Hong Kong/1434/2002); 4) availability of certain influenza vaccine doses with reduced thimerosal content, including single 0.25 mL-dose syringes; and 5) manufacturers of influenza vaccine for the U.S. market. Although the optimal time to vaccinate against influenza is October and November, vaccination in December and later continues to be strongly recommended A link to this report and other information regarding influenza can be accessed at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/flu/fluvirus.htm.

5,334 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
10 Mar 1999-JAMA
TL;DR: In this article, the effectiveness of trivalent influenza vaccine in reducing infection, illness, and absence from work in young, healthy health care professionals was evaluated over three consecutive years, from 1992-1993 to 1994-1995.
Abstract: ContextData are limited and conflicting regarding the effectiveness of influenza vaccine in health care professionals.ObjectiveTo determine the effectiveness of trivalent influenza vaccine in reducing infection, illness, and absence from work in young, healthy health care professionals.DesignRandomized, prospective, double-blind, controlled trial over 3 consecutive years, from 1992-1993 to 1994-1995.SettingTwo large teaching hospitals in Baltimore, Md.ParticipantsTwo hundred sixty-four hospital-based health care professionals without chronic medical problems were recruited; 49 participated for 2 seasons; 24 participated for 3 seasons. The mean age was 28.4 years, 75% were resident physicians, and 57% were women.InterventionParticipants were randomly assigned to receive either an influenza vaccine or a control (meningococcal vaccine, pneumococcal vaccine, or placebo). Serum samples for antibody assays were collected at the time of vaccination, 1 month after vaccination, and at the end of the influenza season. Active weekly surveillance for illness was conducted during each influenza epidemic period.Main Outcome MeasuresSerologically defined influenza infection (4-fold increase in hemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies), days of febrile respiratory illness, and days absent from work.ResultsWe conducted 359 person-winters of serologic surveillance (99.4% follow-up) and 4746 person-weeks of illness surveillance (100% follow-up). Twenty-four (13.4%) of 179 control subjects and 3 (1.7%) of 180 influenza vaccine recipients had serologic evidence of influenza type A or B infection during the study period. Vaccine efficacy against serologically defined infection was 88% for influenza A (95% confidence interval [CI], 47%-97%; P=.001) and 89% for influenza B (95% CI, 14%-99%; P=.03). Among influenza vaccinees, cumulative days of reported febrile respiratory illness were 28.7 per 100 subjects compared with 40.6 per 100 subjects in controls (P=.57) and days of absence were 9.9 per 100 subjects vs 21.1 per 100 subjects in controls (P=.41).ConclusionsInfluenza vaccine is effective in preventing infection by influenza A and B in health care professionals and may reduce reported days of work absence and febrile respiratory illness. These data support a policy of annual influenza vaccination of health care professionals.

615 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results suggest obesity may impair the ability to mount a protective immune response to influenza virus, and PBMCs challenged ex vivo with vaccine strain virus demonstrated that obese individuals had decreased CD8+ T-cell activation and decreased expression of functional proteins compared with healthy weight individuals.
Abstract: Obesity is an independent risk factor for morbidity and mortality from pandemic influenza H1N1. Influenza is a significant public health threat, killing an estimated 250 000–500 000 people worldwide each year. More than one in ten of the world's adult population is obese and more than two-thirds of the US adult population is overweight or obese. No studies have compared humoral or cellular immune responses to influenza vaccination in healthy weight, overweight and obese populations despite clear public health importance. The study employed a convenience sample to determine the antibody response to the 2009–2010 inactivated trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV) in healthy weight, overweight and obese participants at 1 and 12 months post vaccination. In addition, activation of CD8+ T cells and expression of interferon-γ and granzyme B were measured in influenza-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures. Body mass index (BMI) correlated positively with higher initial fold increase in IgG antibodies detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to TIV, confirmed by HAI antibody in a subset study. However, 12 months post vaccination, higher BMI was associated with a greater decline in influenza antibody titers. PBMCs challenged ex vivo with vaccine strain virus, demonstrated that obese individuals had decreased CD8+ T-cell activation and decreased expression of functional proteins compared with healthy weight individuals. These results suggest obesity may impair the ability to mount a protective immune response to influenza virus.

488 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Elderly carers of spouses with dementia have increased activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and a poor antibody response to influenza vaccine, and carers may be more vulnerable to infectious disease than the population of a similar age.

463 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This live attenuated, cold-adapted influenza vaccine was safe, immunogenic, and efficacious against influenza A/H3N2 (including a variant, A/Sydney, not contained in the vaccine) and influenza B.

417 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20235
202210
202133
202037
201940
201838