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Unified Modeling Language

About: Unified Modeling Language is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 12740 publications have been published within this topic receiving 213712 citations. The topic is also known as: UML & UML diagram.


Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: In The Unified Modeling Language User Guide, the original developers of the UML provide a tutorial to the core aspects of the language in a two-color format designed to facilitate learning.
Abstract: In The Unified Modeling Language User Guide, the original developers of the UML--Grady Booch, James Rumbaugh, and Ivar Jacobson--provide a tutorial to the core aspects of the language in a two-color format designed to facilitate learning. Starting with a conceptual model of the UML, the book progressively applies the UML to a series of increasingly complex modeling problems across a variety of application domains. This example-driven approach helps readers quickly understand and apply the UML. For more advanced developers, the book includes a learning track focused on applying the UML to advanced modeling problems.With The Unified Modeling Language User Guide, readers will:Understand what the UML is, what it is not, and why it is relevant to the development of software-intensive systemsMaster the vocabulary, rules, and idioms of the UML in order to "speak" the language effectivelyLearn how to apply the UML to a number of common modeling problemsSee illustrations of the UML's use interspersed with use cases for specific UML features, andGain insight into the UML from the original creators of the UML.

6,634 citations

01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: The Unified Modeling Language Reference Manual as discussed by the authors provides an excellent real-world guide to working with UML, from structured design methods of the '60s and '70s to the competing object-oriented design standards that were unified to create UML.
Abstract: Written by the three pioneers behind the Unified Modeling Language (UML) standard, The Unified Modeling Language Reference Manual provides an excellent real-world guide to working with UML. This title provides expert knowledge on all facets of today's UML standard, helping developers who are encountering UML on the job for the first time to be more productive. The book begins with a history of UML, from structured design methods of the '60s and '70s to the competing object-oriented design standards that were unified in 1997 to create UML. For the novice, the authors illustrate key diagram types such as class, use case, state machine, activity, and implementation. (Of course, learning these basic diagram types is what UML is all about. The authors use an easy-to-understand ticket-booking system for many of their examples.) After a tour of basic document types, The Unified Modeling Language Reference Manual provides an alphabetical listing of more than 350 UML terms. Entries range from a sentence or two to several pages in length. (Class, operation, and use case are just a few of the important terms that are covered.) Though you will certainly need to be acquainted with software engineering principles, this reference will serve the working software developer well. As the authors note, this isn't UML for Dummies, but neither is it an arcane academic treatise. The authors succeed in delivering a readable reference that will answer any UML question, no matter how common or obscure. --Richard Dragan

4,531 citations

Book
01 Dec 1998
TL;DR: This title provides expert knowledge on all facets of today's UML standard, helping developers who are encountering UML on the job for the first time to be more productive.
Abstract: Written by the three pioneers behind the Unified Modeling Language (UML) standard, The Unified Modeling Language Reference Manual provides an excellent real-world guide to working with UML. This title provides expert knowledge on all facets of today's UML standard, helping developers who are encountering UML on the job for the first time to be more productive. The book begins with a history of UML, from structured design methods of the '60s and '70s to the competing object-oriented design standards that were unified in 1997 to create UML. For the novice, the authors illustrate key diagram types such as class, use case, state machine, activity, and implementation. (Of course, learning these basic diagram types is what UML is all about. The authors use an easy-to-understand ticket-booking system for many of their examples.) After a tour of basic document types, The Unified Modeling Language Reference Manual provides an alphabetical listing of more than 350 UML terms. Entries range from a sentence or two to several pages in length. (Class, operation, and use case are just a few of the important terms that are covered.) Though you will certainly need to be acquainted with software engineering principles, this reference will serve the working software developer well. As the authors note, this isn't UML for Dummies, but neither is it an arcane academic treatise. The authors succeed in delivering a readable reference that will answer any UML question, no matter how common or obscure. --Richard Dragan

3,456 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The goal in this paper is to introduce and motivate a methodology, called Tropos, for building agent oriented software systems, based on the notion of agent and all related mentalistic notions, formalized in a metamodel described with a set of UML class diagrams.
Abstract: Our goal in this paper is to introduce and motivate a methodology, called Tropos,1 for building agent oriented software systems. Tropos is based on two key ideas. First, the notion of agent and all related mentalistic notions (for instance goals and plans) are used in all phases of software development, from early analysis down to the actual implementation. Second, Tropos covers also the very early phases of requirements analysis, thus allowing for a deeper understanding of the environment where the software must operate, and of the kind of interactions that should occur between software and human agents. The methodology is illustrated with the help of a case study. The Tropos language for conceptual modeling is formalized in a metamodel described with a set of UML class diagrams.

1,852 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2023228
2022554
2021167
2020287
2019344
2018440