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Urban sprawl

About: Urban sprawl is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 6724 publications have been published within this topic receiving 158498 citations. The topic is also known as: suburban sprawl.


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01 Jan 1993
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the issues of urban sprawl and visit the Sprawl Net, at Rice University, which is under construction, but it should be an interesting resource.
Abstract: Regarding issues of urban sprawl Visit Sprawl Net, at Rice University. It's under construction, but it should be an interesting resource. Check out the traffic in the land of commuting. And, finally, enjoy Los Angeles: Revisiting the Four Ecologies.

1,533 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This ecologic study reveals that urban form could be significantly associated with some forms of physical activity and some health outcomes.
Abstract: Purpose. To determine the relationship between urban sprawl, health, and health-related behaviors. Design. Cross-sectional analysis using hierarchical modeling to relate characteristics of individuals and places to levels of physical activity, obesity, body mass index (BMI), hypertension, diabetes, and coronary heart disease. Setting. U.S. counties (448) and metropolitan areas (83). Subjects. Adults (n 5 206,992) from pooled 1998, 1999, and 2000 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Measures. Sprawl indices, derived with principal components analysis from census and other data, served as independent variables. Self-reported behavior and health status from BRFSS served as dependent variables. Results. After controlling for demographic and behavioral covariates, the county sprawl index had small but significant associations with minutes walked (p 5 .004), obesity (p , .001), BMI (p 5 .005), and hypertension (p 5 .018). Residents of sprawling counties were likely to walk less during leisure time, weigh more, and have greater prevalence of hypertension than residents of compact counties. At the metropolitan level, sprawl was similarly associated with minutes walked (p 5 .04) but not with the other variables. Conclusion. This ecologic study reveals that urban form could be significantly associated with some forms of physical activity and some health outcomes. More research is needed to refine measures of urban form, improve measures of physical activity, and control for other individual and environmental influences on physical activity, obesity, and related health outcomes. (Am J Health Promot 2003;18[1]:47‐57.)

1,445 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors review the literature on characteristics, causes, and costs of alternative development patterns and debunks arguments by Gordon and Richardson in favor of Los Angeles-style sprawl.
Abstract: This article reviews the literature on characteristics, causes, and costs of alternative development patterns. In doing so it debunks arguments by Gordon and Richardson in favor of Los Angeles-style sprawl. Sprawl is not suburbanization generally, but rather forms of suburban development that lack accessibility and open space. Sprawl is not a natural response to market forces, but a product of subsidies and other market imperfections. The costs of sprawl are borne by all of us, not just those creating it, and include inflated public spending, loss of resource lands, and a waning sense of community. The only realistic cure for sprawl is active planning of the sort practiced almost everywhere except the United States (and beginning to appear here out of necessity).

1,290 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: UrbanSim as discussed by the authors is a new model system that was developed to respond to these emerging requirements and has now been applied in three metropolitan areas and described the model system and its application to Eugene-Springfield, Oregon.
Abstract: Metropolitan areas have come under intense pressure to respond to federal mandates to link planning of land use, transportation, and environmental quality; and from citizen concerns about managing the side effects of growth such as sprawl, congestion, housing affordability, and loss of open space. The planning models used by metropolitan planning organizations were generally not designed to address these issues, creating a gap in the ability of planners to systematically assess them. UrbanSim is a new model system that was developed to respond to these emerging requirements and has now been applied in three metropolitan areas. This article describes the model system and its application to Eugene-Springfield, Oregon.

1,192 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2023313
2022597
2021344
2020396
2019388
2018370