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Urban wildlife

About: Urban wildlife is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 355 publications have been published within this topic receiving 9206 citations.


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01 Jan 1984
TL;DR: Introduction Biomes Animals as individuals Animals in populations Dispersal, dispersion and distribution Resources and herbivory Food and feeding Competition within species Competition and facilitation between species Predation Parasites and pathogens Counting animals Experimental management Conservation in theory Conservation in practice Wildlife harvesting Wildlife control
Abstract: 1. What is Wildlife Management? 2. Neglect and Exploitation. 3. Some Successes in Managing Wildlife. 4. Ecosystems and Natural Communities. 5. Population Ecology 6. Animal Behavior and Wildlife Management. 7. Food and Cover. 8. Wildlife Diseases. 9. Predators and Predation. 10. Hunting and Trapping. 11. Wildlife and Water. 12. Wildlife and Soils. 13. Wildlife and Farmlands. 14. Wildlife and Rangelands. 15. Forest Management and Wildlife. 16. Wildlife in Parks and Refuges. 17. Urban Wildlife. 18. Exotic Wildlife. 19. Nongame and Endangered Wildlife. 20. Economics of Wildlife. 21. Conservation Biology and Wildlife Management. 22. Wildlife as a Public Trust. 23. Conclusion. Glossary. Literature Cited. Index.

883 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued that individuals that can adjust their behaviours to the new selection pressures presented by cities should have greater success in urban habitats, and members of species that are less ‘plastic’ or naturally timid in temperament are likely to be disadvantaged in high‐disturbance environments and consequently may be precluded from colonizing cities and towns.
Abstract: Increased urbanization represents a formidable challenge for wildlife. Nevertheless, a few species appear to thrive in the evolutionarily novel environment created by cities, demonstrating the remarkable adaptability of some animals. We argue that individuals that can adjust their behaviours to the new selection pressures presented by cities should have greater success in urban habitats. Accordingly, urban wildlife often exhibit behaviours that differ from those of their rural counterparts, from changes to food and den preferences to adjustments in the structure of their signals. Research suggests that behavioural flexibility (or phenotypic plasticity) may be an important characteristic for succeeding in urban environments. Moreover, some individuals or species might possess behavioural traits (a particular temperament) that are inherently well suited to occupying urban habitats, such as a high level of disturbance tolerance. This suggests that members of species that are less ‘plastic’ or naturally timid in temperament are likely to be disadvantaged in high-disturbance environments and consequently may be precluded from colonizing cities and towns.

607 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the history of wildlife in urban areas, provides examples of wildlife populations that have modified their behavior as an adaptation to urban stresses, and discusses the challenges that resource managers face when dealing with urban wildlife.
Abstract: Wildlife-human interactions are increasing in prevalence as urban sprawl continues to encroach into rural areas Once considered to be unsuitable habitat for most wildlife species, urban/suburban areas now host an array of wildlife populations, many of which were previously restricted to rural or pristine habitats The presence of some wildlife species in close proximity to dense human populations can create conflict, forcing resource managers to address issues relating to urban wildlife However, evidence suggests that wildlife residing in urban areas may not exhibit the same life history traits as their rural counterparts because of adaptation to human-induced stresses This creates difficulty for biologists or managers that must address problems associated with urban wildlife Population control or mitigation efforts aimed at urban wildlife require detailed knowledge of the habits of wildlife populations in urban areas This paper describes the history of wildlife in urban areas, provides examples of wildlife populations that have modified their behavior as an adaptation to urban stresses, and discusses the challenges that resource managers face when dealing with urban wildlife

487 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Novel tools have facilitated the investigation of the ecology of urban foxes and have demonstrated the urban wildlife cycle of E. multilocularis, the aetiological agent of human alveolar echinococcosis.

380 citations

01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: In this article, the authors focus on the biodiversity potential of green roofs and propose guidelines for the creation of different plant and animal habitats on the green roofs, including varying the substrate thickness and using natural soils from nearby areas.
Abstract: Research focusing on the biodiversity potential of green roofs has led to an amendment in building and construction law in Basel, Switzerland. As part of the city's biodiversity strategy, green roofs are now mandatory on new buildings with flat roofs, and guidance is provided for the creation of different plant and animal habitats on the green roofs. Design criteria for the creation of these habitats include varying the substrate thickness and using natural soils from nearby areas. (Studies of green roofs in Zurich, Switzerland, have shown that natural soils can benefit biodiversity through their suitability for locally and regionally endangered species.) The design and construction of green roofs to re-create habitats require close cooperation among all specialists involved. Research and comprehensive planning are also important for creating space on roofs for urban wildlife.

336 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202132
202030
201922
201826
201719
201611