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Topic

Usability

About: Usability is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 43892 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 705208 citation(s). The topic is also known as: user-friendliness & ease of use.
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Book
01 Jan 1993
TL;DR: This guide to the methods of usability engineering provides cost-effective methods that will help developers improve their user interfaces immediately and shows you how to avoid the four most frequently listed reasons for delay in software projects.
Abstract: From the Publisher: Written by the author of the best-selling HyperText & HyperMedia, this book provides an excellent guide to the methods of usability engineering. Special features: emphasizes cost-effective methods that will help developers improve their user interfaces immediately, shows you how to avoid the four most frequently listed reasons for delay in software projects, provides step-by-step information about which methods to use at various stages during the development life cycle, and offers information on the unique issues relating to informational usability. You do not need to have previous knowledge of usability to implement the methods provided, yet all of the latest research is covered.

11,649 citations


Proceedings Article
Adam Paszke1, Sam Gross2, Francisco Massa2, Adam Lerer2  +17 moreInstitutions (11)
01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: This paper details the principles that drove the implementation of PyTorch and how they are reflected in its architecture, and explains how the careful and pragmatic implementation of the key components of its runtime enables them to work together to achieve compelling performance.
Abstract: Deep learning frameworks have often focused on either usability or speed, but not both. PyTorch is a machine learning library that shows that these two goals are in fact compatible: it was designed from first principles to support an imperative and Pythonic programming style that supports code as a model, makes debugging easy and is consistent with other popular scientific computing libraries, while remaining efficient and supporting hardware accelerators such as GPUs. In this paper, we detail the principles that drove the implementation of PyTorch and how they are reflected in its architecture. We emphasize that every aspect of PyTorch is a regular Python program under the full control of its user. We also explain how the careful and pragmatic implementation of the key components of its runtime enables them to work together to achieve compelling performance. We demonstrate the efficiency of individual subsystems, as well as the overall speed of PyTorch on several commonly used benchmarks.

9,926 citations


Book ChapterDOI
11 Jun 1996
TL;DR: This chapter describes the System Usability Scale (SUS) a reliable, low-cost usability scale that can be used for global assessments of systems usability.
Abstract: Usability is not a quality that exists in any real or absolute sense. Perhaps it can be best summed up as being a general quality of the appropriateness to a purpose of any particular artefact. This notion is neatly summed up by Terry Pratchett in his novel Moving Pictures:In just the same way, the usability of any tool or system has to be viewed in terms of the context in which it is used, and its appropriateness to that context. With particular reference to information systems, this view of usability is reflected in the current draft international standard ISO 9241-11 and in the European Community ESPRIT project MUSiC (Measuring Usability of Systems in Context) (e.g. Bevan et al., 1991). In general, it is impossible to specify the usability of a system (i.e. its fitness for purpose) without first defining who are the intended users of the system, the tasks those users will perform with it, and the characteristics of the physical, organizational and social environment in which it will be used.

7,387 citations


Book
Ben Shneiderman1Institutions (1)
01 Jan 1987
Abstract: For courses in Human-Computer Interaction. The Sixth Edition of Designing the User Interface provides a comprehensive, authoritative, and up-to-date introduction to the dynamic field of human-computer interaction (HCI) and user experience (UX) design. This classic book has defined and charted the astonishing evolution of user interfaces for three decades. Students and professionals learn practical principles and guidelines needed to develop high quality interface designs that users can understand, predict, and control. The book covers theoretical foundations and design processes such as expert reviews and usability testing. By presenting current research andinnovations in human-computer interaction, the authors strive toinspire students, guide designers, and provoke researchers to seek solutions that improve the experiences of novice and expert users, while achieving universal usability. The authors also provide balanced presentations on controversial topics such as augmented and virtual reality, voice and natural language interfaces, and information visualization. Updates include current HCI design methods, new design examples, and totally revamped coverage of social media, search and voice interaction. Major revisions were made toEVERY chapter, changing almost every figure (170 new color figures) and substantially updating the references.

6,760 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Viswanath Venkatesh1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: This work presents and tests an anchoring and adjustment-based theoretical model of the determinants of system-specific perceived ease of use, and proposes control, intrinsic motivation, and emotion as anchors that determine early perceptions about the ease ofuse of a new system.
Abstract: Much previous research has established that perceived ease of use is an important factor influencing user acceptance and usage behavior of information technologies. However, very little research has been conducted to understand how that perception forms and changes over time. The current work presents and tests an anchoring and adjustment-based theoretical model of the determinants of system-specific perceived ease of use. The model proposes control (internal and external--conceptualized as computer self-efficacy and facilitating conditions, respectively), intrinsic motivation (conceptualized as computer playfulness), and emotion (conceptualized as computer anxiety) as anchors that determine early perceptions about the ease of use of a new system. With increasing experience, it is expected that system-specific perceived ease of use, while still anchored to the general beliefs regarding computers and computer use, will adjust to reflect objective usability, perceptions of external control specific to the new system environment, and system-specific perceived enjoyment. The proposed model was tested in three different organizations among 246 employees using three measurements taken over a three-month period. The proposed model was strongly supported at all points of measurement, and explained up to 60% of the variance in system-specific perceived ease of use, which is twice as much as our current understanding. Important theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

5,218 citations


Network Information
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202237
20212,205
20202,558
20192,838
20182,777
20172,571