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Topic

Voltage graph

About: Voltage graph is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 8292 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 236232 citation(s).
Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1976-
Abstract: (1977). Graph Theory with Applications. Journal of the Operational Research Society: Vol. 28, Volume 28, issue 1, pp. 237-238.

7,219 citations



Book
01 Jan 1998-
TL;DR: This book presents an account of newer topics, including Szemer'edi's Regularity Lemma and its use; Shelah's extension of the Hales-Jewett Theorem; the precise nature of the phase transition in a random graph process; the connection between electrical networks and random walks on graphs; and the Tutte polynomial and its cousins in knot theory.
Abstract: The time has now come when graph theory should be part of the education of every serious student of mathematics and computer science, both for its own sake and to enhance the appreciation of mathematics as a whole. This book is an in-depth account of graph theory, written with such a student in mind; it reflects the current state of the subject and emphasizes connections with other branches of pure mathematics. The volume grew out of the author's earlier book, Graph Theory -- An Introductory Course, but its length is well over twice that of its predecessor, allowing it to reveal many exciting new developments in the subject. Recognizing that graph theory is one of several courses competing for the attention of a student, the book contains extensive descriptive passages designed to convey the flavor of the subject and to arouse interest. In addition to a modern treatment of the classical areas of graph theory such as coloring, matching, extremal theory, and algebraic graph theory, the book presents a detailed account of newer topics, including Szemer\'edi's Regularity Lemma and its use, Shelah's extension of the Hales-Jewett Theorem, the precise nature of the phase transition in a random graph process, the connection between electrical networks and random walks on graphs, and the Tutte polynomial and its cousins in knot theory. In no other branch of mathematics is it as vital to tackle and solve challenging exercises in order to master the subject. To this end, the book contains an unusually large number of well thought-out exercises: over 600 in total. Although some are straightforward, most of them are substantial, and others will stretch even the most able reader.

3,714 citations


Proceedings ArticleDOI
06 Jun 2010-
TL;DR: A model for processing large graphs that has been designed for efficient, scalable and fault-tolerant implementation on clusters of thousands of commodity computers, and its implied synchronicity makes reasoning about programs easier.
Abstract: Many practical computing problems concern large graphs. Standard examples include the Web graph and various social networks. The scale of these graphs - in some cases billions of vertices, trillions of edges - poses challenges to their efficient processing. In this paper we present a computational model suitable for this task. Programs are expressed as a sequence of iterations, in each of which a vertex can receive messages sent in the previous iteration, send messages to other vertices, and modify its own state and that of its outgoing edges or mutate graph topology. This vertex-centric approach is flexible enough to express a broad set of algorithms. The model has been designed for efficient, scalable and fault-tolerant implementation on clusters of thousands of commodity computers, and its implied synchronicity makes reasoning about programs easier. Distribution-related details are hidden behind an abstract API. The result is a framework for processing large graphs that is expressive and easy to program.

3,556 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Franco Scarselli1, Marco Gori1, Ah Chung Tsoi2, Markus Hagenbuchner3  +1 moreInstitutions (3)
TL;DR: A new neural network model, called graph neural network (GNN) model, that extends existing neural network methods for processing the data represented in graph domains, and implements a function tau(G,n) isin IRm that maps a graph G and one of its nodes n into an m-dimensional Euclidean space.
Abstract: Many underlying relationships among data in several areas of science and engineering, e.g., computer vision, molecular chemistry, molecular biology, pattern recognition, and data mining, can be represented in terms of graphs. In this paper, we propose a new neural network model, called graph neural network (GNN) model, that extends existing neural network methods for processing the data represented in graph domains. This GNN model, which can directly process most of the practically useful types of graphs, e.g., acyclic, cyclic, directed, and undirected, implements a function tau(G,n) isin IRm that maps a graph G and one of its nodes n into an m-dimensional Euclidean space. A supervised learning algorithm is derived to estimate the parameters of the proposed GNN model. The computational cost of the proposed algorithm is also considered. Some experimental results are shown to validate the proposed learning algorithm, and to demonstrate its generalization capabilities.

3,082 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20216
20206
20197
201844
2017480
2016505