scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Topic

Wife

About: Wife is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 6204 publications have been published within this topic receiving 88685 citations. The topic is also known as: married woman.


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Marriage of Marxism and Feminism has been like the marriage of husband and wife depicted in English common law: marxism and feminism are one, and that one is MARXism.
Abstract: The “Marriage” Of Marxism and Feminism has been like the marriage of husband and wife depicted in English common law: marxism and feminism are one, and that one is marxism.1 Recent attempts to integrate marxism and feminism are unsatisfactory to us as feminists because they subsume the feminist struggle into the “larger” struggle against capital. To continue our simile further, either we need a healthier marriage or we need a divorce.

1,164 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors explored seven types of process models: (a) anger as a dangerous emotion, active listening, negative affect reciprocity, negative start-up by the wife, de-escalation, positive affect models, and physiological soothing of the male.
Abstract: A study with 130 newlywed couples was designed to explore marital interaction processes that are predictive of divorce or marital stability, processes that further discriminate between happily and unhappily married stable couples. We explore seven types of process models: (a) anger as a dangerous emotion, (b) active listening, (c) negative affect reciprocity, (d) negative start-up by the wife, (e) de-escalation, (f) positive affect models, and (g) physiological soothing of the male. Support was not found for the models of anger as a dangerous emotion, active listening, or negative affect reciprocity. Support was found for models of the husband's rejecting his wife's influence, negative start-up by the wife, a lack of de-escalation of low intensity negative wife affect by the husband, or a lack of de-escalation of high intensity husband negative affect by the wife, and a lack of physiological soothing of the male, all predicting divorce. Support was found for a contingent positive affect model and for balance models (i.e., ratio models) of positive-to-negative affect predicting satisfaction among stable couples. Divorce and stability were predicted with 83% accuracy and satisfaction with 80% accuracy. Key Words: divorce, gender, interaction, newlyweds, physiology. Recently some of our best scholars (e.g., Jacobson & Addis, 1993) have contended that marital therapy has relapse rates so high that the entire enterprise may be in a state of crisis. Consistent with these conclusions, the recent Consumer Reports study of psychotherapy (Seligman, 1995) also reported that marital therapy received the lowest marks from psychotherapy consumers. Marital therapy may be at an impasse because it is not based on a process model derived from prospective longitudinal studies of what real couples do that predicts if their marriages will wind up happy and stable, unhappy and stable, or end in divorce. Differential longitudinal prediction of marital satisfaction and stability may be an essential step that has been omitted in designing marital therapy. Building a process model of marriage using this prediction approach could turn out to be superior to building an intervention by imagining what target populations in trouble may need or by imagining it according to some theoretical position. What has happened in the field of marital therapy is that a psychotherapy of marriage has been constructed by extending methods of psychotherapy to the design of marital interventions, instead of building a marital therapy from the way people normally go about the process of staying happily married. However, we should point out that this is an assumption. This could be called "the single theory assumption," which claims that the functioning, dysfunctioning, and repair of marital relationships can be explained using one theory. Alternatively, it might be the case that any process, such as active listening, might be a great intervention, even if people don't naturally do it. Thus, to use an analogy, it might be the case that more than one set of "orthopedic knowledge" is necessary in marriage, one about the normally developing "bones" of marriage and another about how to repair "broken bones" in therapy. We do not think that this will be the case. We attempt to build such a process model of marriage. What processes ought to be included for investigation in building a process model? It may be inadequate to simply describe what is "dysfunctional" when a marriage is ailing. It may be necessary to describe what is "functional" when a marriage is working well. This may not be redundant information. "DYSFUNCTIONAL" MODELS OF MARITAL PROCESSES Two Models of Negative Affect: Anger as a Destructive Emotion Versus the "Four Horsemen" The first set of processes concerns what might be called "the specificity of negativity hypothesis." It addresses the question of whether all negative affects are equally corrosive in marriages. …

1,026 citations

Book
01 Mar 1976
TL;DR: In this paper, Lakeland et al. discuss the role of women in the modern situation of Moroccan women and women's fundamentalism, and the economic basis of sexual anomie in Moroco.
Abstract: Muslim Women and Fundamentalism: Introduction to the Revised Edition Preface: A Note to the Western Reader Introduction: Roots of the Modern Situation Part One: The Traditional Muslim View of Women and Their Place in the Social Order 1. The Muslim Concept of Active Female Sexuality 2. Regulation of Female Sexuality in the Muslim Social Order 3. Sex and Marriage Before Islam Part Two: Anomic Effects of Modernization on Male-Female Dynamics 4. The Modern Situation: Moroccan Data 5. Sexual Anomie As Revealed by the Data 6. Husband and Wife 7. The Mother-in-Law 8. The Meaning of Spatial Boundaries 9. The Economic Basis of Sexual Annomie in Moroco Conclusion: Women's Liberation in Muslim Countries Notes Suggested Supplementary Reading Compiled by Mary Jo Lakeland Index

792 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Analysis of demand and withdraw behaviors indicated that both husband and wife were more likely to be demanding when discussing a change they wanted and morelikely to be withdrawing when discussed a change their partner wanted.
Abstract: This study examined the effects of gender and social structure on the demand/withdraw pattern of marital conflict. In this pattern, the demander, usually the woman, pressures the other through emotional requests, criticism, and complaints, and the withdrawer, usually the man, retreats through defensiveness and passive inaction. In this study, 31 couples were assessed in 2 conflict situations: 1 in which husband wanted a change in wife and 1 in which wife wanted a change in husband. Data from husbands, wives, and observers consistently revealed a significant main effect of gender (wife-demand/husband-withdraw interaction was more likely than husband-demand/wife-withdraw interaction) and a significant interaction of gender and conflict structure (wife-demand/husband-withdraw interaction was more likely than the reverse only when discussing a change the wife wanted). Separate analyses of demand and withdraw behaviors indicated that both husband and wife were more likely to be demanding when discussing a change they wanted and more likely to be withdrawing when discussing a change their partner wanted. However, men were overall more withdrawn than women, but women were not overall more demanding than men.

789 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The economic approach to the family seeks to explain these trends by reference to models that can also explain how and why families form as mentioned in this paper, which is not a static institution and the defining characteristics of marriage have changed.
Abstract: The family is not a static institution. In recent decades, marriage rates have fallen, divorce rates have risen, and the defining characteristics of marriage have changed. The economic approach to the family seeks to explain these trends by reference to models that can also explain how and why families form. Gary Becker’s (1981) Treatise on the Family proposed a theory based on “production complementarities,” in which husband and wife specialize in the market and domestic spheres, respectively. Production complementarities also arise in the production and rearing of one’s own children. However, production complementarities—at least as initially described—are decreasingly central to modern family life. Increased longevity and declining fertility mean that most of one’s adult life is spent without one’s own children in the household. Also, the rise in marital formation at older ages, including remarriage, means that many families form with no intention of producing children. Moreover, increases in female labor force participation suggest that household specialization has either declined or, at least taken on a different meaning. These changes have come about as what is produced in the home has been dramatically altered both by the emergence of labor-saving technology in the home and by the development of service industries that allow much of what was once provided by specialized homemakers to be purchased in the market. The availabil

789 citations


Network Information
Related Topics (5)
Government
141K papers, 1.9M citations
81% related
Politics
263.7K papers, 5.3M citations
78% related
Narrative
64.2K papers, 1.1M citations
77% related
Ethnic group
49.7K papers, 1.2M citations
76% related
Poverty
77.2K papers, 1.6M citations
76% related
Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20231,002
20222,141
2021138
2020155
2019158
2018161