scispace - formally typeset

Topic

Work–life interface

About: Work–life interface is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 71 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 13964 citation(s).


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Although the model was invariant across gender and race, there were differences across blue- and white-collar workers.
Abstract: A comprehensive model of the work-family interface was developed and tested. The proposed model extended prior research by explicitly distinguishing between work interfering with family and family interfering with work. This distinction allowed testing of hypotheses concerning the unique antecedents and outcomes of both forms of work-family conflict and a reciprocal relationship between them. The influence of gender, race, and job type on the generalizability of the model was also examined. Data were obtained through household interviews with a random sample of 631 individuals. The model was tested with structural equation modeling techniques. Results were strongly supportive. In addition, although the model was invariant across gender and race, there were differences across blue- and white-collar workers. Implications for future research on the work-family interface are discussed.

2,544 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: This article introduces work/family border theory - a new theory about work/family balance. According to the theory, people are daily border-crossers between the domains of work and family. The theory addresses how domain integration and segmentation, border creation and management, border-crosser participation, and relationships between border-crossers and others at work and home influence work/family balance. Propositions are given to guide future research.

1,907 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: The authors examined the direct and indirect effects of organizational policies and practices that are supportive of family responsibilities on work-family conflict and psychological, physical, and behavioral measures of strain. Survey data were gathered at 45 acute-care facilities from 398 health professionals who had children aged 16 years or younger at home. Supportive practices, especially flexible scheduling and supportive supervisors, had direct positive effects on employee perceptions of control over work and family matters. Control perceptions, in turn, were associated with lower levels of work-family conflict, job dissatisfaction, depression, somatic complaints, and blood cholesterol. These results suggest that organizations can take steps that can increase employees' control over family responsibilities and that this control might help employees better manage conflicting demands of work and family life

1,733 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Ecological theory was used to develop a more expanded conceptualization of the work- family interface and to identify significant correlates of multiple dimensions of work-family spillover.
Abstract: Ecological theory was used to develop a more expanded conceptualization of the work-family interface and to identify significant correlates of multiple dimensions of work-family spillover. Using data from employed adults participating in the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (N = 1,986), negative spillover from work to family, positive spillover from work to family, negative spillover from family to work, and positive spillover from family to work were found to be distinct work-family experiences. Analyses indicated that work and family factors that facilitated development (e.g., decision latitude, family support) were associated with less negative and more positive spillover between work and family. By contrast, work and family barriers (e.g., job pressure, family disagreements) were associated with more negative spillover and less positive spillover between work and family. In some cases, results differ significantly by gender.

1,620 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jun 1999
Abstract: We developed a measure of work–family culture (i.e., the shared assumptions, beliefs, and values regarding the extent to which an organization supports and values the integration of employees' work and family lives) and examined its relationship to work–family benefit utilization, organizational attachment, and work–family conflict. Using survey data from 276 managers and professionals, we identified three dimensions of work–family culture: managerial support for work–family balance, career consequences associated with utilizing work–family benefits, and organizational time expectations that may interfere with family responsibilities. As predicted, perceptions of a supportive work–family culture were related to employees' use of work–family benefits. Both work–family benefit availability and supportive work–family culture were positively related to affective commitment and negatively related to work–family conflict and intentions to leave the organization. In addition, the three culture dimensions were found to have unique relationships with these behaviors and attitudes.

1,495 citations

Network Information
Related Topics (5)
Job performance

23.2K papers, 1.1M citations

82% related
Organizational commitment

33K papers, 1.5M citations

80% related
Organizational culture

31.5K papers, 926.7K citations

79% related
Job satisfaction

58K papers, 1.8M citations

78% related
Entrepreneurship

71.7K papers, 1.7M citations

74% related
Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20219
202011
20194
20186
20174
20164