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Xylopia aethiopica

About: Xylopia aethiopica is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 347 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 5511 citation(s).


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The chemical composition of the essential oils obtained from the leaves, the barks of the stem and the root, as well as from the fresh and dried fruits of Xylopia aethiopica, growing in Ghana, was investigated by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses and beta-Pinene was predominant in all cases.
Abstract: The chemical composition of the essential oils obtained from the leaves, the barks of the stem and the root, as well as from the fresh and dried fruits of Xylopia aethiopica, growing in Ghana, was investigated by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses. Kovats indices, mass spectra, and standard compounds were used to identify a total of 93 individual compounds. The monoterpene hydrocarbons formed the main portion in all studied samples. β-Pinene was predominant in all cases, while trans-m-mentha-1(7),8-diene was the main compound in the essential oils of the leaves and the barks of roots and stems. Their potential antioxidant activity was also investigated and found to be significant in scavenging superoxide anion radical. Keywords: Xylopia aethiopica; Ghana; volatile constituents; leaves; fruits; stem bark; root bark

185 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An ethnobotanical study of plants used by the traditional healers, herbalists and rural dwellers for the treatment of diabetes mellitus was conducted in the Eastern Cape Province and revealed the use of infusions from plant leaves and roots was the commonest method of herbal preparation.
Abstract: Aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Ocimum gratissimum and xylopia aethiopica were analyzed for their antimicrobial activities against five pathogenic organisms; Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus fecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Lactobacilli. Ethanolic extracts of O. gratissimum had a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 30 mg/ml against S. aureus, E. coli, P. aeruginosa and lactobacilli while for S. fecalis the MIC was 15 mg/ml. Aqueous extracts of O. gratissimum had an MIC of 12.5 mg/ml against S. aureus, E. coli and S. fecalis, while for P. aeruginosa and lactobacilli the MIC was 6.25 and 25 mg/ml, respectively. Ethanolic extracts of X. aethiopica showed an MIC of 10 mg/ml in the five organisms tested. While its aqueous extract gave an MIC of 30 mg/ml for S. aureus and Lactobacilli, and 15 mg/ml for E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. fecalis. Our findings suggest that the anti-microbial activity of these spices reside in their aqueous fractions and also indicate that very low concentrations are required to achieve antimicrobial effects.

170 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Essential oils of D. tripetela and P. guineense achieved 100% mortality of adults of Callosobruchus maculatus and Sitophilus zeamais in 24 h and cowpea and maize grains treated with seed oils suppressed the e...
Abstract: Seed powders and the essential oils of Dennettia tripetela Baker F., Piper guineense Schum and Thonn, Mondora myristica (Gaerth) Dunal and Xylopia aethiopica Dunal A. Rich were evaluated for their effectiveness in protecting cowpea and maize grains during storage. D. tripetela powder mixed with maize grains, at 1.5 g per 25 g was significantly more effective (P < 0.05) than P. guineense, M. myristica and X. aethiopica in achieving 100% mortality of adults of Sitophilus zeamais in 24 h, and was also as effective as pirimiphosmethyl (10 ppm) in achieving 100% mortality of adult weevil in 24 h, 3 months after treatment at a dose of 3g per 25 g. There was no F1 emergence except in grains treated with M. myristica, X. aethiopica and the untreated controls. Essential oils of D. tripetela and P. guineense achieved 100% mortality of adults of Callosobruchus maculatus and Sitophilus zeamais in 24 h. Except in cowpea treated with X. aethiopica cowpea and maize grains treated with seed oils suppressed the e...

146 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The essential oils of Xylopia aethiopica, Monodora myristica, Zanthoxylum xanthoxyloïdes and Z. leprieurii, four Cameroonian plants used as spices in local food, showed antibacterial and antifungal activity.
Abstract: The essential oils of Xylopia aethiopica, Monodora myristica, Zanthoxylum xanthoxyloides and Z. leprieurii, four Cameroonian plants used as spices in local food, showed antibacterial and antifungal activity.

134 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The overall results of the present study provide supportive data on the use of some Cameroonian plants for cancer treatment and indicate that the anti-angiogenic properties of the most active extracts were able to inhibit angiogenesis by more than 50% in quail embryo.
Abstract: Ethnopharmacological relevance Several medicinal plants and spices are used traditionally to treat cancers in Cameroon. Aim Methanol extracts from thirty-four spices and plants, with related ethnobotanical use were investigated for their in vitro cytotoxicity on the human pancreatic cancer cell line MiaPaCa-2, leukemia CCRF-CEM cells and their multidrug resistant (MDR) subline CEM/ADR5000, and the normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In addition the anti-angiogenic properties of the most active extracts were investigated. Material and methods The MTS [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium] assay was used for cytotoxic studies and the CAM-assay (chicken-chorioallantoic-membrane-assay) for anti-angiogenesis test. Results The results of the cytotoxicity tests indicated that, when tested at 20 μg/ml, extracts from Xylopia aethiopica, Echinops giganteus, Imperata cylindrica, Dorstenia psilirus and Piper capense were able to inhibit more that 50% the proliferation of the three tested cancer cells (MiaPaCa-2, CEM/ADR5000 CCRF-CEM). The lowest IC50 values of 6.86 μg/ml on MiaPaCa-2 and 3.91 μg/ml on CCRF-CEM cells were obtained with X. aethiopica, while the corresponding value of 6.56 μg/ml was obtained with P. capense on CEM/ADR5000 cells. Against leukemia cells, no cross-resistance was observed with I. cylindrica, P. capense and Zinziber officinalis. Extracts from D. psilirus and E. giganteus were able to inhibit angiogenesis by more than 50% in quail embryo. Conclusion The overall results of the present study provide supportive data on the use of some Cameroonian plants for cancer treatment.

127 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202115
202022
201913
201828
201717
201621