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Y chromosome

About: Y chromosome is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 7056 publications have been published within this topic receiving 281678 citations. The topic is also known as: GO:0000806 & chrY.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The use of fluorescence in situ hybridization for chromosome classification and detection of chromosome aberrations is described and chromosomes in human-hamster hybrid cell lines were intensely and uniformly stained in metaphase spreads and interphase nuclei when human genomic DNA was used as a probe.
Abstract: This report describes the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization for chromosome classification and detection of chromosome aberrations. Biotin-labeled DNA was hybridized to target chromosomes and subsequently rendered fluorescent by successive treatments with fluorescein-labeled avidin and biotinylated anti-avidin antibody. Human chromosomes in human-hamster hybrid cell lines were intensely and uniformly stained in metaphase spreads and interphase nuclei when human genomic DNA was used as a probe. Interspecies translocations were detected easily at metaphase. The human-specific fluorescence intensity from cell nuclei and chromosomes was proportional to the amount of target human DNA. Human Y chromosomes were fluorescently stained in metaphase and interphase nuclei by using a 0.8-kilobase DNA probe specific for the Y chromosome. Cells from males were 40 times brighter than those from females. Both Y chromosomal domains were visible in most interphase nuclei of XYY amniocytes. Human 28S ribosomal RNA genes on metaphase chromosomes were distinctly stained by using a 1.5-kilobase DNA probe.

3,191 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
19 Jul 1990-Nature
TL;DR: A search of a 35-kilobase region of the human Y chromosome necessary for male sex determination has resulted in the identification of a new gene, termed SRY (for sex-determining region Y) and proposed to be a candidate for the elusive testis-d determining gene, TDF.
Abstract: A search of a 35-kilobase region of the human Y chromosome necessary for male sex determination has resulted in the identification of a new gene. This gene is conserved and Y-specific among a wide range of mammals, and encodes a testis-specific transcript. It shares homology with the mating-type protein, Mc, from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and a conserved DNA-binding motif present in the nuclear high-mobility-group proteins HMG1 and HMG2. This gene has been termed SRY (for sex-determining region Y) and proposed to be a candidate for the elusive testis-determining gene, TDF.

3,019 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
09 May 1991-Nature
TL;DR: It is shown that Sry on a 14-kilobase genomic DNA fragment is sufficient to induce testis differentiation and subsequent male development when introduced into chromosomally female mouse embryos.
Abstract: The initiation of male development in mammals requires one or more genes on the Y chromosome. A recently isolated gene, termed SRY in humans and Sry in mouse, has many of the genetic and biological properties expected of a Y-located testis-determining gene. It is now shown that Sry on a 14-kilobase genomic DNA fragment is sufficient to induce testis differentiation and subsequent male development when introduced into chromosomally female mouse embryos.

2,070 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
19 Jun 2003-Nature
TL;DR: The male-specific region of the Y chromosome, the MSY, differentiates the sexes and comprises 95% of the chromosome's length, and is a mosaic of heterochromatic sequences and three classes of euchromatics sequences: X-transposed, X-degenerate and ampliconic.
Abstract: The male-specific region of the Y chromosome, the MSY, differentiates the sexes and comprises 95% of the chromosome's length. Here, we report that the MSY is a mosaic of heterochromatic sequences and three classes of euchromatic sequences: X-transposed, X-degenerate and ampliconic. These classes contain all 156 known transcription units, which include 78 protein-coding genes that collectively encode 27 distinct proteins. The X-transposed sequences exhibit 99% identity to the X chromosome. The X-degenerate sequences are remnants of ancient autosomes from which the modern X and Y chromosomes evolved. The ampliconic class includes large regions (about 30% of the MSY euchromatin) where sequence pairs show greater than 99.9% identity, which is maintained by frequent gene conversion (non-reciprocal transfer). The most prominent features here are eight massive palindromes, at least six of which contain testis genes.

2,022 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
19 Jul 1990-Nature
TL;DR: A gene mapping to the sex-determining region of the mouse Y chromosome is deleted in a line of XY female mice mutant for Tdy, and is expressed at a stage during male gonadal development consistent with its having a role in testis determination.
Abstract: A gene mapping to the sex-determining region of the mouse Y chromosome is deleted in a line of XY female mice mutant for Tdy, and is expressed at a stage during male gonadal development consistent with its having a role in testis determination. This gene is a member of a new family of at least five mouse genes, related by an amino-acid motif showing homology to other known or putative DNA-binding domains.

1,604 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202340
2022130
2021135
2020153
2019163
2018145