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Author

B N Mehrotra

Bio: B N Mehrotra is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topic(s): Antiprotozoal & Biological activity. The author has an hindex of 15, co-authored 16 publication(s) receiving 4206 citation(s).
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Book
01 Jan 1990

1,375 citations



01 Jan 1968
TL;DR: Two hundred and eighty-five botanically identifide plant materials have been extracted with 50 percent ethanol and the extracts put through a wide biological screen of 61 tests, which include tests for antibacterial, antifungal, anthelminthic, antiprotozoal, anticancer, antIFertillity, hypoglycaemic and a wide range of pharmacological activities.
Abstract: Two hundred and eighty-five botanically identifide plant materials have been extracted with 50 percent ethanol and the extracts put through a wide biological screen of 61 tests. These include tests for antibacterial, antifungal, anthelminthic, antiprotozoal, anticancer, antifertillity, hypoglycaemic and a wide range of pharmacological activities.

355 citations




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Book ChapterDOI
Iris F.F. Benzie1, J. J. StrainInstitutions (1)
TL;DR: The ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) assay is a recently developed, direct test of “total antioxidant power” that facilitates experimental and clinical studies investigating the relationship among antioxidant status, dietary habits, and risk of disease.
Abstract: Publisher Summary This chapter discusses ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. The ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) assay is a recently developed, direct test of “total antioxidant power.” The FRAP assay is robust, sensitive, simple, and speedy and facilitates experimental and clinical studies investigating the relationship among antioxidant status, dietary habits, and risk of disease. Measurement of the total antioxidant power of fresh biological fluids—such as blood plasma—can be measured directly; the antioxidant content of various dietary agents can be measured objectively and reproducibly and their potential for improving the antioxidant status of the body investigated and compared. The FRAP assay is also sensitive and analytically precise enough to be used in assessing the bioavailability of antioxidants in dietary agents to help monitor longitudinal changes in antioxidant status associated with an increased intake of dietary antioxidants and to investigate the effects of disease on antioxidant status.

2,755 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This review describes and discusses several approaches to selecting higher plants as candidates for drug development with the greatest possibility of success and identifies and discusses advantages and disadvantages of using plants as starting points for drugDevelopment, specifically those used in traditional medicine.
Abstract: In this review we describe and discuss several approaches to selecting higher plants as candidates for drug development with the greatest possibility of success. We emphasize the role of information derived from various systems of traditional medicine (ethnomedicine) and its utility for drug discovery purposes. We have identified 122 compounds of defined structure, obtained from only 94 species of plants, that are used globally as drugs and demonstrate that 80% of these have had an ethnomedical use identical or related to the current use of the active elements of the plant. We identify and discuss advantages and disadvantages of using plants as starting points for drug development, specifically those used in traditional medicine.

1,821 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
J.K Grover1, S.P Yadav1, V Vats1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: 45 plants and their products that have been mentioned/used in the Indian traditional system of medicine and have shown experimental or clinical anti-diabetic activity are reviewed.
Abstract: Since ancient times, plants have been an exemplary source of medicine. Ayurveda and other Indian literature mention the use of plants in treatment of various human ailments. India has about 45 000 plant species and among them, several thousands have been claimed to possess medicinal properties. Research conducted in last few decades on plants mentioned in ancient literature or used traditionally for diabetes have shown anti-diabetic property. The present paper reviews 45 such plants and their products (active, natural principles and crude extracts) that have been mentioned/used in the Indian traditional system of medicine and have shown experimental or clinical anti-diabetic activity. Indian plants which are most effective and the most commonly studied in relation to diabetes and their complications are: Allium cepa, Allium sativum, Aloe vera, Cajanus cajan, Coccinia indica, Caesalpinia bonducella, Ficus bengalenesis, Gymnema sylvestre, Momordica charantia, Ocimum sanctum, Pterocarpus marsupium, Swertia chirayita, Syzigium cumini, Tinospora cordifolia and Trigonella foenum graecum. Among these we have evaluated M. charantia, Eugenia jambolana, Mucuna pruriens, T. cordifolia, T. foenum graecum, O. sanctum, P. marsupium, Murraya koeingii and Brassica juncea. All plants have shown varying degree of hypoglycemic and anti-hyperglycemic activity.

1,541 citations


Journal Article
TL;DR: Safety evaluation studies indicate that both turmeric and curcumin are well tolerated at a very high dose without any toxic effects, and have the potential for the development of modern medicine for the treatment of various diseases.
Abstract: Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is extensively used as a spice, food preservative and colouring material in India, China and South East Asia. It has been used in traditional medicine as a household remedy for various diseases, including biliary disorders, anorexia, cough, diabetic wounds, hepatic disorders, rheumatism and sinusitis. For the last few decades, extensive work has been done to establish the biological activities and pharmacological actions of turmeric and its extracts. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), the main yellow bioactive component of turmeric has been shown to have a wide spectrum of biological actions. These include its antiinflammatory, antioxidant, anticarcinogenic, antimutagenic, anticoagulant, antifertility, antidiabetic, antibacterial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, antiviral, antifibrotic, antivenom, antiulcer, hypotensive and hypocholesteremic activities. Its anticancer effect is mainly mediated through induction of apoptosis. Its antiinflammatory, anticancer and antioxidant roles may be clinically exploited to control rheumatism, carcinogenesis and oxidative stress-related pathogenesis. Clinically, curcumin has already been used to reduce post-operative inflammation. Safety evaluation studies indicate that both turmeric and curcumin are well tolerated at a very high dose without any toxic effects. Thus, both turmeric and curcumin have the potential for the development of modern medicine for the treatment of various diseases.

951 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Cinnamon, clove and lime oils were found to be inhibiting both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, whereas aniseed, eucalyptus and camphor oils were least active against the tested bacteria.
Abstract: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of 21 plant essential oils against six bacterial species. The selected essential oils were screened against four gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris) and two gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus at four different concentrations (1:1, 1:5, 1:10 and 1:20) using disc diffusion method. The MIC of the active essential oils were tested using two fold agar dilution method at concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 25.6 mg/ml. Out of 21 essential oils tested, 19 oils showed antibacterial activity against one or more strains. Cinnamon, clove, geranium, lemon, lime, orange and rosemary oils exhibited significant inhibitory effect. Cinnamon oil showed promising inhibitory activity even at low concentration, whereas aniseed, eucalyptus and camphor oils were least active against the tested bacteria. In general, B. subtilis was the most susceptible. On the other hand, K. pneumoniae exhibited low degree of sensitivity. Majority of the oils showed antibacterial activity against the tested strains. However Cinnamon, clove and lime oils were found to be inhibiting both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Cinnamon oil can be a good source of antibacterial agents.

882 citations


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Performance
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Author's H-index: 15

No. of papers from the Author in previous years
YearPapers
19961
19921
19902
19881
19861
19843