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Ch. Wittekind

Bio: Ch. Wittekind is an academic researcher from Leipzig University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Carcinoma & Cervical cancer. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 5 publications receiving 15467 citations.

Papers
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BookDOI
01 Jan 1987
TL;DR: Head and Neck Tumours.- Lip and Oral Cavity.- Pharynx.- Larynx.' Maxillary Sinus.- Salivary Glands.- Thyroid Gland.- Digestive System Tumour .
Abstract: Head and Neck Tumours.- Lip and Oral Cavity.- Pharynx.- Larynx.- Maxillary Sinus.- Salivary Glands.- Thyroid Gland.- Digestive System Tumours.- Oesophagus.- Stomach.- Colon and Rectum.- Anal Canal.- Liver.- Gall Bladder.- Extrahepatic Bile Ducts.- Ampulla of Vater.- Pancreas.- Lung Tumours.- Tumours of Bone and Soft Tissues.- Bone.- Soft Tissue.- Skin Tumours.- Carcinoma of Skin.- Melanoma of Skin.- Breast Tumours.- Gynaecological Tumours.- Cervix Uteri.- Corpus Uteri.- Ovary.- Vagina.- Vulva.- Urological Tumours.- Prostate.- Testis.- Penis.- Urinary Bladder.- Kidney.- Renal Pelvis and Ureter.- Urethra.- Ophthalmic Tumours.- Carcinoma of Eyelid.- Malignant Melanoma of Eyelid.- Carcinoma of Conjunctiva.- Malignant Melanoma of Conjunctiva.- Malignant Melanoma of Uvea.- Retinoblastoma.- Sarcoma of Orbit.- Carcinoma of Lacrimal Gland.- Brain Tumours.- Hodgkin's Disease.- Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.- Paediatric Tumours.- Nephroblastoma (Wilms' Tumour).- Neuroblastoma.- Soft Tissue Sarcomas - Paediatric.

15,624 citations

Book
12 Aug 2005
TL;DR: Residual Tumour (R) Classification: Tumours of Bone and Soft Tissues, Hodgkin Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin L lymphoma.
Abstract: "The TNM Atlas" is designed as an aid for the practical application of the TNM classification system by illustrating the T and N categories in clear, easily understood graphics The aim of such a presentation is twofold: to enable all disciplines involved to reach a more standardized understanding and documentation of the anatomic spread of tumours, and to further enhance the dissemination and use of the TNM classification This Fifth Edition includes: all changes and additions to the Sixth Edition of "The TNM Classification of Malignant Tumours"; numerous new figures to illustrate changes and new definitions of categories of: head and neck tumours; some digestive system tumours; pleural melanoma; malignant melanoma of skin; breast tumours; urological tumours; and, ophthalmic tumours

334 citations

OtherDOI
15 Apr 2003
TL;DR: The classifications applied to carcinomas of the lung and malignant mesothelioma of the pleura are as follows: lung cancer, pleura cancer, and other types of cancer.
Abstract: The classifications apply to carcinomas of the lung and malignant mesothelioma of the pleura.

71 citations

OtherDOI
26 Feb 2017
TL;DR: GIST (GIST) are newly classified in TNM-7 (in the Digestive System chapter) based on GIST's three major prognostic factors: site, size, and mitotic rate.
Abstract: There are no changes in the bone and soft tissue tumours classification in TNM-7. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are newly classified in TNM-7 (in the Digestive System chapter). The classification is based on GIST's three major prognostic factors: site, size, and mitotic rate. The categorization is the result of studies of over two thousand cases by Miettinen et al.

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The most important new aspects included in this updated guideline include the newly published FIGO classification of 2018, the radical open surgery approach for cervical cancers up to FIGO stage IB1, and use of the sentinel lymph node technique for tumors.
Abstract: Aim This update of the interdisciplinary S3 guideline on the Diagnosis, Therapy and Follow-up of Cervical Cancer (AWMF Registry No. 032/033OL) was published in March 2021. This updated guideline was funded by German Cancer Aid (Deutsche Krebshilfe) as part of the German Guideline Program in Oncology. The guideline was coordinated by the German Society of Gynecology and Obstetrics ( Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gynäkologie und Geburtshilfe , DGGG) and the Working Group on Gynecological Oncology ( Arbeitsgemeinschaft Gynäkologische Onkologie , AGO) of the German Cancer Society ( Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft , DKG). Method The process of updating the S3 guideline dating from 2014 was based on an appraisal of the available evidence using the criteria of evidence-based medicine, adaptations of existing evidence-based national and international guidelines or - if evidence was lacking - on a consensus of the specialists involved in compiling the update. After an initial review of the current literature was carried out according to a prescribed algorithm, several areas were identified which, in contrast to the predecessor version from September 2014, required new recommendations or statements which took account of more recently published literature and the appraisal of the new evidence. Recommendations The short version of this guideline consists of recommendations and statements on the epidemiology, screening, diagnostic workup and therapy of patients with cervical cancer. The most important new aspects included in this updated guideline include the newly published FIGO classification of 2018, the radical open surgery approach for cervical cancers up to FIGO stage IB1, and use of the sentinel lymph node technique for tumors ≤ 2 cm. Other changes include the use of PET-CT, new options in radiotherapy (e.g., intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image-guided adaptive brachytherapy), and drug therapies to treat recurrence or metastasis.

5 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Liver transplantation is an effective treatment for small, unresectable hepatocellular carcinomas in patients with cirrhosis and after four years, the actuarial survival rate was 75 percent and the rate of recurrence-free survival was 83 percent.
Abstract: Background The role of orthotopic liver transplantation in the treatment of patients with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma is controversial, and determining which patients are likely to have a good outcome after liver transplantation is difficult. Methods We studied 48 patients with cirrhosis who had small, unresectable hepatocellular carcinomas and who underwent liver transplantation. In 94 percent of the patients, the cirrhosis was related to infection with hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, or both. The presence of tumor was confirmed by biopsy or serum alpha-fetoprotein assay. The criteria for eligibility for transplantation were the presence of a tumor 5 cm or less in diameter in patients with single hepatocellular carcinomas and no more than three tumor nodules, each 3 cm or less in diameter, in patients with multiple tumors. Twenty-eight patients with sufficient hepatic function underwent treatment for the tumor, mainly chemoembolization, before transplantation. After liver transplantation...

6,002 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This research framework seeks to create a common language with which investigators can generate and test hypotheses about the interactions among different pathologic processes (denoted by biomarkers) and cognitive symptoms and envision that defining AD as a biological construct will enable a more accurate characterization and understanding of the sequence of events that lead to cognitive impairment that is associated with AD.
Abstract: In 2011, the National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer's Association created separate diagnostic recommendations for the preclinical, mild cognitive impairment, and dementia stages of Alzheimer's disease. Scientific progress in the interim led to an initiative by the National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer's Association to update and unify the 2011 guidelines. This unifying update is labeled a "research framework" because its intended use is for observational and interventional research, not routine clinical care. In the National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer's Association Research Framework, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is defined by its underlying pathologic processes that can be documented by postmortem examination or in vivo by biomarkers. The diagnosis is not based on the clinical consequences of the disease (i.e., symptoms/signs) in this research framework, which shifts the definition of AD in living people from a syndromal to a biological construct. The research framework focuses on the diagnosis of AD with biomarkers in living persons. Biomarkers are grouped into those of β amyloid deposition, pathologic tau, and neurodegeneration [AT(N)]. This ATN classification system groups different biomarkers (imaging and biofluids) by the pathologic process each measures. The AT(N) system is flexible in that new biomarkers can be added to the three existing AT(N) groups, and new biomarker groups beyond AT(N) can be added when they become available. We focus on AD as a continuum, and cognitive staging may be accomplished using continuous measures. However, we also outline two different categorical cognitive schemes for staging the severity of cognitive impairment: a scheme using three traditional syndromal categories and a six-stage numeric scheme. It is important to stress that this framework seeks to create a common language with which investigators can generate and test hypotheses about the interactions among different pathologic processes (denoted by biomarkers) and cognitive symptoms. We appreciate the concern that this biomarker-based research framework has the potential to be misused. Therefore, we emphasize, first, it is premature and inappropriate to use this research framework in general medical practice. Second, this research framework should not be used to restrict alternative approaches to hypothesis testing that do not use biomarkers. There will be situations where biomarkers are not available or requiring them would be counterproductive to the specific research goals (discussed in more detail later in the document). Thus, biomarker-based research should not be considered a template for all research into age-related cognitive impairment and dementia; rather, it should be applied when it is fit for the purpose of the specific research goals of a study. Importantly, this framework should be examined in diverse populations. Although it is possible that β-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tau deposits are not causal in AD pathogenesis, it is these abnormal protein deposits that define AD as a unique neurodegenerative disease among different disorders that can lead to dementia. We envision that defining AD as a biological construct will enable a more accurate characterization and understanding of the sequence of events that lead to cognitive impairment that is associated with AD, as well as the multifactorial etiology of dementia. This approach also will enable a more precise approach to interventional trials where specific pathways can be targeted in the disease process and in the appropriate people.

5,126 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy improved survival among patients with potentially curable esophageal or esophagogastric-junction cancer and the regimen was associated with acceptable adverse-event rates.
Abstract: A B S T R AC T BACKGROUND The role of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of patients with esophageal or esophagogastric-junction cancer is not well established. We compared chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery with surgery alone in this patient population. METHODS We randomly assigned patients with resectable tumors to receive surgery alone or weekly administration of carboplatin (doses titrated to achieve an area under the curve of 2 mg per milliliter per minute) and paclitaxel (50 mg per square meter of body-surface area) for 5 weeks and concurrent radiotherapy (41.4 Gy in 23 fractions, 5 days per week), followed by surgery. RESULTS From March 2004 through December 2008, we enrolled 368 patients, 366 of whom were included in the analysis: 275 (75%) had adenocarcinoma, 84 (23%) had squamous-cell carcinoma, and 7 (2%) had large-cell undifferentiated carcinoma. Of the 366 patients, 178 were randomly assigned to chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery, and 188 to surgery alone. The most common major hematologic toxic effects in the chemoradiotherapy–surgery group were leukopenia (6%) and neutropenia (2%); the most common major nonhematologic toxic effects were anorexia (5%) and fatigue (3%). Complete resection with no tumor within 1 mm of the resection margins (R0) was achieved in 92% of patients in the chemoradiotherapy–surgery group versus 69% in the surgery group (P<0.001). A pathological complete response was achieved in 47 of 161 patients (29%) who underwent resection after chemoradiotherapy. Postoperative complications were similar in the two treatment groups, and in-hospital mortality was 4% in both. Median overall survival was 49.4 months in the chemoradiotherapy– surgery group versus 24.0 months in the surgery group. Overall survival was significantly better in the chemoradiotherapy–surgery group (hazard ratio, 0.657; 95% confidence interval, 0.495 to 0.871; P = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS Preoperative chemoradiotherapy improved survival among patients with potentially curable esophageal or esophagogastric-junction cancer. The regimen was associated with acceptable adverse-event rates. (Funded by the Dutch Cancer Foundation [KWF Kankerbestrijding]; Netherlands Trial Register number, NTR487.)

4,047 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Suggestions include additional cutoffs for tumor size, with tumors >7 cm moving from T2 to T3; reassigning the category given to additional pulmonary nodules in some locations; and reclassifying pleural effusion as an M descriptor.

3,466 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors highlight the overall organizational and structural changes as well as “what's new” in the Eighth Edition of the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual.
Abstract: The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging manual has become the benchmark for classifying patients with cancer, defining prognosis, and determining the best treatment approaches. Many view the primary role of the tumor, lymph node, metastasis (TNM) system as that of a standardized classification system for evaluating cancer at a population level in terms of the extent of disease, both at initial presentation and after surgical treatment, and the overall impact of improvements in cancer treatment. The rapid evolution of knowledge in cancer biology and the discovery and validation of biologic factors that predict cancer outcome and response to treatment with better accuracy have led some cancer experts to question the utility of a TNM-based approach in clinical care at an individualized patient level. In the Eighth Edition of the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual, the goal of including relevant, nonanatomic (including molecular) factors has been foremost, although changes are made only when there is strong evidence for inclusion. The editorial board viewed this iteration as a proactive effort to continue to build the important bridge from a "population-based" to a more "personalized" approach to patient classification, one that forms the conceptual framework and foundation of cancer staging in the era of precision molecular oncology. The AJCC promulgates best staging practices through each new edition in an effort to provide cancer care providers with a powerful, knowledge-based resource for the battle against cancer. In this commentary, the authors highlight the overall organizational and structural changes as well as "what's new" in the Eighth Edition. It is hoped that this information will provide the reader with a better understanding of the rationale behind the aggregate proposed changes and the exciting developments in the upcoming edition. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:93-99. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

3,362 citations