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Jason Ditton

Bio: Jason Ditton is an academic researcher from Durham University. The author has contributed to research in topic(s): Dilemma. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 4 publication(s) receiving 122 citation(s).
Topics: Dilemma

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
Jason Ditton1
TL;DR: Invisible wages as discussed by the authors, workers are not only paid as a class, but also receive large segments of their wages "invisibly" -as tips or fiddles from customers, or pilferage and perks from employers.
Abstract: History lives on. The perpetual and perpetuating myth of the present is to believe that we -are liberated from the anguish of the past. On the contrary, the greatest source of history is impregnated in the mundane and everyday world of the present. The meaning of the world of work, for example, is revealed in its relationship to its past. Workers are not only, on the whole, paid as a class,1 those situated at structurally disadvantaged parts receive large segments of their wages “invisibly” - as tips or fiddles from customers, or pilferage and perks from employers. The crucial common factor in these forms of “invisible wages” is the added power which accrues to employers through their establishment. They are meaningfully located, however, not simply as archaic relics in the gradual rational liberation of the present from the feudal bond, but as forms of domination crucial to the persistence and growth of modern capitalism because of their solution to those disciplinary problems not soluble in money alone.

84 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Jason Ditton1
TL;DR: A lengthy period of participant observation and subsequent semi-structured interviewing in the sales department of a factory bakery showed that the bread salesmen regularly 'fiddle' small amounts of bread as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: A lengthy period of participant observation and subsequent semi-structured interviewing in the sales department of a factory bakery showed that the bread salesmen regularly `fiddle' small amounts o...

16 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Jason Ditton1
TL;DR: It is shown that rather than suggesting an 'answer' to the problem (which destroys the problem itself) analysis needs to propose a dialectic of concepts reflecting a dialectics of things.
Abstract: For many years the problem of the output restricter h ^ been the subject of much concerned research. It is generally accorded however, what Collit^;wood calls eristical rather than dialectical status.' I hope to show in this article, to the contrary, that rather than suggesting an 'answer' to the problem (which destroys the problem itself) analysis needs to propose a dialectic of concepts reflecting a dialectic of things. As Nettler caustically remarks:

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Jason Ditton1
TL;DR: In this article, a lengthy period of participation observation and subsequent semistructured interviewing among the bread salesmen in an English factory bakery showed that the salesmen regularly steal small sums of money from their customers.
Abstract: A lengthy period of participation observation and subsequent semistructured interviewing among the bread salesmen in an Englishfactory bakery showed that the salesmen regularly steal small sums of money from their customers. Paradoxically, although this is clearly (and seriously) theft, the salesmen manage to sustain a def inition of the practice as trifing. This paper shows that the salesmen's adoption of systematic theft (and their definition of it as unimportant) is a rational response to a critical organisational dilemma, and that ultimately, the responsiblity for illegality lies squarely with the bakery management.

11 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Feb 1979-Futures
TL;DR: The authors of as discussed by the authors suggest that a wide range of services which were once produced in the money economy are increasingly provided informally on a self-service basis. But they do not consider the role of the state in the provision of these services.
Abstract: This article continues a line of argument, initiated in Futures∗, suggesting that a wide range of services which were once produced in the money economy are increasingly provided informally—on a self-service basis. The informal economy contains a diverse collection of activities that may be divided into three categories: the household, the communal, and the underground. This last in turn covers a wide range, from outright theft, to tax evasion and moonlighting. Government taxation and welfare policies, changes in lifestyles, and the self-service economy combine to make the informal economy a sector of growing importance. Governments have three options: they can ignore the informal economy, suppress it, or exploit it. The last appears preferable, but would require some initiatives from the state.

1,018 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors distinguish functional i-deals from their dysfunctional counterparts and highlight evidence of i-deal in previous organizational research, and outline the implications of these arrangements for research and for managing contemporary employment relationships.
Abstract: Idiosyncratic employment arrangements (i-deals) stand to benefit the individual employee as well as his or her employer. However, unless certain conditions apply, coworkers may respond negatively to these arrangements. We distinguish functional i-deals from their dysfunctional counterparts and highlight evidence of i-deals in previous organizational research. We develop propositions specifying both how ideals are formed and how they impact workers and coworkers. Finally, we outline the implications i-deals have for research and for managing contemporary employment relationships.

437 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a comprehensive literature review and meta-analysis of the antecedents of trust and consequences of trust in a sales context, concluding that trust has a moderate but beneficial influence on the development of positive customer attitudes, intentions, and behavior.
Abstract: The development of trust between salespeople and their customers has traditionally been considered a critical element in developing and maintaining a successful sales relationship. This article presents the first comprehensive literature review and meta-analysis of the antecedents of trust and consequences of trust in a sales context. A summary conclusion is that trust has a moderate but beneficial influence on the development of positive customer attitudes, intentions, and behavior. Another conclusion is that salespeople have modest influence over the development of trust between themselves and their customers. A comprehensive model of the role of trust in sales is presented. Directions for future research are identified.

335 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Using the phenomenon of deviance by employees against the rules of the formal work organization as the behavior of interest, the differential saliences of both formal (i.e., management) and informa...
Abstract: Using the phenomenon of deviance by employees against the rules of the formal work organization as the behavior of interest, the differential saliences of both formal (i.e., management) and informa...

312 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The study found that the perception of both the certainty and severity of organizational sanctions were related to employee theft, and interactions between age/certainty and age/severity suggest that younger employees are not as deterrable as their older peers, especially under conditions of both high certainty and high severity of punishment.
Abstract: The phenomenon of employee theft is examined empirically, utilizing a deterrence paradigm. Employees selected randomly from three different industry sectors and metropolitan areas were asked to self-report their involvement in a number of property theft activities within the employment setting. Using a weighted least-squares logit regression analysis, the study found that the perception of both the certainty and severity of organizational sanctions were related to employee theft. Males reported more theft than did females, but contrary to previous research, no gender/certainty or gender/severity interactions were observed. The best-fit model did, however, contain two significant first-order interactions: age/certainty and age/severity. These interactions strongly suggest that younger employees are not as deterrable as their older peers, especially under conditions of both high certainty and high severity of punishment. While a number of possible explanations might account for differential deterrability according to age, a commitment to or stakes in conformity explanation is proposed.

253 citations