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Author

Paul Simpson

Other affiliations: Queen's University
Bio: Paul Simpson is an academic researcher from Queen's University Belfast. The author has contributed to research in topics: Narrative & Pragmatics. The author has an hindex of 15, co-authored 46 publications receiving 1934 citations. Previous affiliations of Paul Simpson include Queen's University.

Papers
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Book
25 Jun 1993
TL;DR: The author uses examples from a variety of literary and non-literary text types such as, narrative fiction, advertisements and newspaper reports to explore the ways in which point of view intersects with and is shaped by ideology.
Abstract: This systematic introduction to the concept of point of view in language explores the ways in which point of view intersects with and is shaped by ideology. It specifically focuses on the way in which speakers and writers linguistically encode their beliefs, interests and biases in a wide range of media. The book draws on an extensive array of linguistic theories and frameworks and each chapter includes a self-contained introduction to a particular topic in linguistics, allowing easy reference. The author uses examples from a variety of literary and non-literary text types such as, narrative fiction, advertisements and newspaper reports.

718 citations

Book
15 Jul 2004
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors introduce the concept of stylistics and explore different levels of language at work in the context of narrative fiction, using a stylistic approach to point-of-view analysis.
Abstract: A - Introduction: key concepts in stylistics 1 What is stylistics? 2 Stylistics and levels of language 3 Grammar and style 4 Rhythm and metre 5 Narrative stylistics 6 Style as choice 7 Style and point of view 8 Representing speech and thought 9 Dialogue and discourse 10 Cognitive stylistics 11 Metaphor and metonymy 12 New directions in stylistics: corpus approaches B - Development: doing stylistics 1 Developments in stylistics. 2 Levels of language at work: an example from poetry 3 Sentence styles: development and illustration 4 Interpreting patterns of sound 5 Developments in structural narratology 6 Style and transitivity 7 Approaches to point of view 8 Techniques of speech and thought presentation 9 Dialogue in drama 10 Developments in cognitive stylistics 11 Styles of metaphor 12 Developments in corpus stylistics C - Exploration: investigating style 1 Is there a "literary language"? 2 Style, register and dialect 3 Grammar and genre: a short study in Imagism 4 Styles in a single poem: an exploration 5 A sociolinguistic model of narrative 6 Transitivity, characterisation and literary genre 7 Exploring point of view in narrative fiction 8 A workshop on speech and thought presentation 9 Exploring dialogue 10 Cognitive stylistics at work 11 Exploring metaphors in different kinds of texts 12 Using corpora in stylistic analysis D- Extension: readings in stylistics. 1 Stylistics and the teaching of literature (Henry Widdowson) 2 Style and verbal play (Katie Wales) 3 Teaching grammar and style (Ronald Carter) 4 Sound, style and onomatopoeia (Derek Attridge) 5 A typology of narrative gaps (Donald Hardy) 6 Transitivity at work (Deirdre Burton) 7 Style variation and point of view (Mick Short) 8 The effects of free indirect discourse (Joe Bray) 9 Multi-modal analysis and the stylistics of drama (Dan McIntyre) 10 Conceptual blending and stylistic analysis (Barbara Dancygier) 11 Cognitive stylistics and the theory of metaphor (Peter Stockwell) 12 Corpus stylistics (Michaela Mahlberg and Catherine Smith)

354 citations

Book
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: This paper proposed a model for the analysis of contemporary satirical humour, combining a range of theoretical frameworks in stylistics, pragmatics and discourse analysis, and examined both the methods of textual composition and the strategies of interpretation for satire.
Abstract: This book advances a model for the analysis of contemporary satirical humour. Combining a range of theoretical frameworks in stylistics, pragmatics and discourse analysis, Simpson examines both the methods of textual composition and the strategies of interpretation for satire. Verbal irony is central to the model, in respect of which Simpson isolates three principal “ironic phases” that shape the uptake of satirical humour. Throughout the book, consistent emphasis is placed on satire’s status as a culturally situated discursive practice, while the categories of the model proposed are amply illustrated with textual examples. A notable feature of the book is a chapter on the legal implications of using satirical humour as a weapon of attack in the public domain. A book where Jonathan Swift meets Private Eye magazine, this entertaining and thought-provoking study will interest those working in stylistics, humorology, pragmatics and discourse analysis. It also has relevance for forensic discourse analysis, and for media, literary and cultural studies.

152 citations

Book
24 Dec 1996
TL;DR: This introduction to the English language through the medium of English literature offers a lively and accessible guide to concepts and techniques in English language study.
Abstract: Paul Simpson provides a definitive introduction to the English language through the medium of English Literature. Through the use of illustrations from poetry, prose and drama, this book offers a lively and accessible guide to important concepts and techniques in English language study. Each chapter: * develops a particular topic in language through a series of practical tasks * provides points for further discussion * includes project work for use individually, or as part of a group. Students will find the author's selection and presentation of topics helpful, as he progressively widens the scope of topics through from single words to the structure of whole conversations. By developing practical activities designed for the study of English Language, this book goes way beyond pure linguistic description, and will be an invaluable aid for the beginner student of the English language.

103 citations

Book
01 Feb 1989
TL;DR: This collection shows students of English and applied linguistics ways in which language and literary study can be integrated byDrawing on a wide range of texts by mainly British and American writers, from a variety of different periods, the contributors show how discourse stylistics can provide models for the systematic description of dialogue in fiction.
Abstract: This collection shows students of English and applied linguistics ways in which language and literary study can be integrated. By drawing on a wide range of texts by mainly British and American writers, from a variety of different periods, the contributors show how discourse stylistics can provide models for the systematic description of, for example, dialogue in fiction; language of drama and balladic poetry; speech presentation; the interactive properties of metre; the communicative context of author/reader. Among the texts examined are novels, poetry and drama by major twentieth-century writers such as Joyce, Auden, Pinter and Hopkins, as well as examples from Shakespeare, Donne and Milton. Each chapter has a wide range of exercises for practical analysis, an extensive glossary and a comprehensive bibliography with suggestions for further reading. The book will be particularly useful to undergraduate students of English and applied linguistics and advanced students of modern languages or English as a foreign language.

103 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Imagined communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism are discussed. And the history of European ideas: Vol. 21, No. 5, pp. 721-722.

13,842 citations

01 Jan 2009

7,241 citations

Book
01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: Fawcett, M.K.Halliday, Sydney M. Lamb and Adam Makkai as discussed by the authors presented a systemic-functional interpretation of the nature and ontogenesis of dialogue.
Abstract: List of Figures List of Tables Foreword Introduction Robin P. Fawcett, M.A.K. Halliday, Sydney M. Lamb and Adam Makkai 1 Language as Code and Language as Behaviour: A Systemic-Functional Interpretation of the Nature and Ontogenesis of Dialogue M.A.K. Halliday 2 Metaphors of Information John Regan 3 How Universal is a Localist Hypothesis? A Linguistic Contribution to the Study of 'Semantic Styles' of Language Yoshihiko Ikegami 4 Some Speculations on Language Contact in a Wider Setting Jeffrey Ellis 5 Ways of Saying: Ways of Meaning Ruqaiya Hasan Index

2,087 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors consider the notions of inherent and mock impoliteness, and discuss contextual factors associated with impolite behaviour, and demonstrate that in some contexts, such as army training and literary drama, impolitity behaviour is not a marginal activity, and that we need an appropriate descriptive framework in order to account for it.

1,058 citations