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Richard E. Barlow

Other affiliations: RAND Corporation
Bio: Richard E. Barlow is an academic researcher from University of California, Berkeley. The author has contributed to research in topics: Reliability (statistics) & Fault tree analysis. The author has an hindex of 36, co-authored 81 publications receiving 17113 citations. Previous affiliations of Richard E. Barlow include RAND Corporation.


Papers
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Book
01 Jun 1981
TL;DR: A number of new classes of life distributions arising naturally in reliability models are treated systematically and each provides a realistic probabilistic description of a physical property occurring in the reliability context, thus permitting more realistic modeling of commonly occurring reliability situations.
Abstract: : This is the first of two books on the statistical theory of reliability and life testing. The present book concentrates on probabilistic aspects of reliability theory, while the forthcoming book will focus on inferential aspects of reliability and life testing, applying the probabilistic tools developed in this volume. This book emphasizes the newer, research aspects of reliability theory. The concept of a coherent system serves as a unifying theme for much of the book. A number of new classes of life distributions arising naturally in reliability models are treated systematically: the increasing failure rate average, new better than used, decreasing mean residual life, and other classes of distributions. As the names would seem to indicate, each such class of life distributions provides a realistic probabilistic description of a physical property occurring in the reliability context. Also various types of positive dependence among random variables are considered, thus permitting more realistic modeling of commonly occurring reliability situations.

3,876 citations

Book
01 Jan 1965

2,722 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, two types of preventive maintenance policies are considered, and the optimum policies are determined, in each case, as unique solutions of certain integral equations depending on the failure distribution.
Abstract: Two types of preventive maintenance policies are considered. A policy is defined to be optimum if it maximizes “limiting efficiency,” i.e., fractional amount of up-time over long intervals. Elementary renewal theory is used to obtain optimum policies. The optimum policies are determined, in each case, as unique solutions of certain integral equations depending on the failure distribution. It is shown that both solutions are also minimum cost solutions when the proper identifications are made. The two optimum policies are compared under certain restrictions.

1,279 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Isotonic regression under order restrictions has been used to test the equality of ordered means for goodness of fit as discussed by the authors, in the normal case and in the special case of a sigma-lattice.
Abstract: : ;Contents: Isotonic regression; Estimation under order restrictions; Testing the equality of ordered means--likelihood ratio tests in the normal case; Testing the equality of ordered means--extensions and generalizations; Estimation of distributions; Isotonic tests for goodness of fit; Conditional expectation given a sigma-lattice

741 citations


Cited by
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Book ChapterDOI
TL;DR: The analysis of censored failure times is considered in this paper, where the hazard function is taken to be a function of the explanatory variables and unknown regression coefficients multiplied by an arbitrary and unknown function of time.
Abstract: The analysis of censored failure times is considered. It is assumed that on each individual arc available values of one or more explanatory variables. The hazard function (age-specific failure rate) is taken to be a function of the explanatory variables and unknown regression coefficients multiplied by an arbitrary and unknown function of time. A conditional likelihood is obtained, leading to inferences about the unknown regression coefficients. Some generalizations are outlined.

28,264 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: Deming's theory of management based on the 14 Points for Management is described in Out of the Crisis, originally published in 1982 as mentioned in this paper, where he explains the principles of management transformation and how to apply them.
Abstract: According to W. Edwards Deming, American companies require nothing less than a transformation of management style and of governmental relations with industry. In Out of the Crisis, originally published in 1982, Deming offers a theory of management based on his famous 14 Points for Management. Management's failure to plan for the future, he claims, brings about loss of market, which brings about loss of jobs. Management must be judged not only by the quarterly dividend, but by innovative plans to stay in business, protect investment, ensure future dividends, and provide more jobs through improved product and service. In simple, direct language, he explains the principles of management transformation and how to apply them.

9,241 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors give a brief review of the basic idea and some history and then discuss some developments since the original paper on regression shrinkage and selection via the lasso.
Abstract: Summary. In the paper I give a brief review of the basic idea and some history and then discuss some developments since the original paper on regression shrinkage and selection via the lasso.

3,054 citations

Book ChapterDOI
TL;DR: This chapter extends the newsvendor model by allowing the retailer to choose the retail price in addition to the stocking quantity, and discusses an infinite horizon stochastic demand model in which the retailer receives replenishments from a supplier after a constant lead time.
Abstract: Publisher Summary This chapter reviews the supply chain coordination with contracts. Numerous supply chain models are discussed. In each model, the supply chain optimal actions are identified. The chapter extends the newsvendor model by allowing the retailer to choose the retail price in addition to the stocking quantity. Coordination is more complex in this setting because the incentives provided to align one action might cause distortions with the other action. The newsvendor model is also extended by allowing the retailer to exert costly effort to increase demand. Coordination is challenging because the retailer's effort is noncontractible—that is, the firms cannot write contracts based on the effort chosen. The chapter also discusses an infinite horizon stochastic demand model in which the retailer receives replenishments from a supplier after a constant lead time. Coordination requires that the retailer chooses a large basestock level.

2,626 citations