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Will Kymlicka

Bio: Will Kymlicka is an academic researcher from Queen's University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Multiculturalism & Minority rights. The author has an hindex of 55, co-authored 254 publications receiving 20926 citations. Previous affiliations of Will Kymlicka include University of New Orleans & University of Ottawa.


Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1995
TL;DR: The authors argued that certain kinds of "collective rights" for minority cultures are consistent with liberal democratic principles, and that standard liberal objections to recognizing such rights on grounds of individual freedom, social justice, and national unity can be answered.
Abstract: The increasingly multicultural fabric of modern societies has given rise to many new issues and conflicts, as ethnic and national minorities demand recognition and support for their cultural identity. This book presents a new conception of the rights and status of minority cultures. It argues that certain sorts of 'collective rights' for minority cultures are consistent with liberal democratic principles, and that standard liberal objections to recognizing such rights on grounds of individual freedom, social justice, and national unity, can be answered. However, Professor Kymlicka emphasises that no single formula can be applied to all groups and that the needs and aspirations of immigrants are very different from those of indigenous peoples and national minorities. The book discusses issues such as language rights, group representation, religious education, federalism, and secession - issues which are central to understanding multicultural politics, but which have been surprisingly neglected in contemporary liberal theory.

3,453 citations

Book
01 Jan 1989
TL;DR: The value of cultural membership equality for Minority Membership Equality for Minority Cultures Minority Rights and Liberal Tradition Walzer and Minority Rights Communitarianism and minority rights Apartheid in South Africa.
Abstract: Introduction LIBERALISM: Liberalism The Right and the Good COMMUNITY: Communitarianism and the Self Taylor's `Social Thesis' Marxism and the Critique of Justice LIBERALISM AND CULTURAL MEMBERSHIP: Liberalism in Culturally Plural Societies The Value of Cultural Membership Equality for Minority Membership Equality for Minority Cultures Minority Rights and Liberal Tradition Walzer and Minority Rights Communitarianism and Minority Rights Apartheid in South Africa Conclusion

1,339 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, Carens, Young, PAREKH, and FROST discuss the evolution of minority rights and the role of immigrants in the debate over minority rights in the United States.
Abstract: PART L. THE EVOLUTION OF MINORITY RIGHTS DEBATE 1. The New Debate over Minority Rights 2. Liberal Culturalism: An Emerging Consensus? 3. Do We Need a Liberal Theory of Minority Rights? REPLY TO CARENS, YOUNG, PAREKH, AND FROST PART LL. ETHNOCULTURAL JUSTICE 4. Human Rights and Ethnocultural Justice 5. Minority Nationalism and Multination Federalism 6. Theorizing Indigenous Rights 7. Indigenous Rights and Environmental Justice 8. The Theory and Practice of Immigrant Multiculturalism 9. A Crossroad in Race Relations PART LLL. MISUNDERSTANDING NATIONALISM 10. From Enlightenment Cosmopolitanism to Liberal NATIONALISM 11. Cosmopolitanism, Nation-States, and Minority Nationalism 12. Misunderstanding Nationalism 13. The Paradox of Nationalism 14. American Multiculturalism in the International Arena 15. Minority Nationalism and Immigrant Integration PART LV: DEMOCRATIC CITIZENSHIP IN MULTIETHNIC STATES 16. Education for Citizenship 17. Citizenship in an Era of Globalization: Commentary on Held 18. Liberal Egalitarianism and Civic Republicanism: Friends or Enemies?

1,136 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1994-Ethics
TL;DR: There has been an explosion of interest in the concept of citizenship among political theorists in the 1990s as discussed by the authors, and there are a number of reasons for this renewed interest in citizenship.
Abstract: There has been an explosion of interest in the concept of citizenship among political theorists In 1978, it could be confidently stated that "the concept of citizenship has gone out of fashion among political thinkers" (van Gunsteren 1978, p 9) Fifteen years later, citizenship has become the "buzz word" among thinkers on all points of the political spectrum (Heater 1990, p 293; Vogel and Moran 1991, p x) There are a number of reasons for this renewed interest in citizenship in the 1990s At the level of theory, it is a natural evolution in political discourse because the concept of citizenship seems to integrate the demands ofjustice and community membership-the central concepts of political philosophy in the 1970s and 1980s, respectively Citizenship is intimately linked to ideas of individual entitlement on the one hand and of attachment to a particular community on the other Thus it may help clarify what is really at stake in the debate between liberals and communitarians Interest in citizenship has also been sparked by a number of recent political events and trends throughout the world-increasing voter apathy and long-term welfare dependency in the United States, the resurgence of nationalist movements in Eastern Europe, the stresses created by an increasingly multicultural and multiracial population in Western Europe, the backlash against the welfare state in Thatcher's England, the failure of environmental policies that rely on voluntary citizen cooperation, and so forth These events have made clear that the health and stability of a modern democracy depends, not only on the justice of its 'basic structure' but also on the qualities and attitudes of its citizens:' for example,

1,097 citations

Book
01 Jan 1990
TL;DR: In this article, the authors introduce Utilitarianism, Liberal Equality, Libertarianism, Communitarianism, Citizenship Theory, Multiculturalism, and Feminism, with a focus on women.
Abstract: 1 Introduction 2 Utilitarianism 3 Liberal Equality 4 Libertarianism 5 Marxism 6 Communitarianism 7 Citizenship Theory 8 Multiculturalism 9 Feminism

976 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Imagined communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism are discussed. And the history of European ideas: Vol. 21, No. 5, pp. 721-722.

13,842 citations

Book
01 Jan 1993
TL;DR: The third edition of the 3rd edition of as mentioned in this paper is the most comprehensive survey of international migration in the post-Cold-War era of globalization, focusing on the formation of ethnic minorities.
Abstract: Preface to the 3rd Edition - Introduction - The Migratory Process and the Formation of Ethnic Minorities - International Migration Before 1945 - Migration to Highly Developed Countries since 1945 - The State of International Migration: The Quest for Control - The Next Waves: The Globalization of International Migration - New Migrations in the Asia-Pacific Region - Migrants and Minorities in the Labour Force - The Migratory Process: A Comparison of Australia and Germany - New Ethnic Minorities and Society - Migrants and Politics - Conclusion: Migration in the Post Cold-War Era of Globalization

3,041 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In their new Introduction, the authors relate the argument of their book both to the current realities of American society and to the growing debate about the country's future as mentioned in this paper, which is a new immediacy.
Abstract: Meanwhile, the authors' antidote to the American sicknessa quest for democratic community that draws on our diverse civic and religious traditionshas contributed to a vigorous scholarly and popular debate. Attention has been focused on forms of social organization, be it civil society, democratic communitarianism, or associative democracy, that can humanize the market and the administrative state. In their new Introduction the authors relate the argument of their book both to the current realities of American society and to the growing debate about the country's future. With this new edition one of the most influential books of recent times takes on a new immediacy.\

2,940 citations

Book
01 Jan 1983
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a typology of nationalisms in industrial and agro-literature societies, and a discussion of the difficulties of true nationalism in industrial societies.
Abstract: Series Editor's Preface. Introduction by John Breuilly. Acknowledgements. 1. Definitions. State and nation. The nation. 2. Culture in Agrarian Society. Power and culture in the agro-literature society. The varieties of agrarian rulers. 3. Industrial Society. The society of perpetual growth. Social genetics. The age of universal high culture. 4. The Transition to an Age of Nationalism. A note on the weakness of nationalism. Wild and garden culture. 5. What is a Nation. The course of true nationalism never did run smooth. 6. Social Entropy and Equality in Industrial Society. Obstacles to entropy. Fissures and barriers. A diversity of focus. 7. A Typology of Nationalisms. The varieties of nationalist experience. Diaspora nationalism. 8. The Future of Nationalism. Industrial culture - one or many?. 9. Nationalism and Ideology. Who is for Nuremberg?. One nation, one state. 10. Conclusion. What is not being said. Summary. Select bibliography. Bilbliography of Ernest Gellner's writing: Ian Jarvie. Index

2,912 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
John W. Berry1
TL;DR: The authors examined the cultural and psychological aspects of these phenomena that take place during the process of acculturation, and found that there are large group and individual differences in how people (in both groups in contact) go about their acculture (described in terms of the integration, assimilation, separation and marginalization strategies), in how much stress they experience, and how well they adapt psychologically and socioculturally.

2,742 citations